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You know you're old..

Discussion in 'Open Discussion' started by digitalandfilm, Feb 4, 2013.

  1. digitalandfilm

    digitalandfilm Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jul 18, 2011
    When you remember this:

    8445378694_4f9b6185dd_b.

    :biggrin:
     
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  2. Fmrvette

    Fmrvette This Space For Rent

    May 26, 2012
    Detroit, Michigan
    Jim
    That I can remember; it's what I did Tuesday that I can't remember :) .

    Regards,

    Jim

    Sent from my Nexus 7
     
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  3. 67DGS

    67DGS Mu-43 Regular

    43
    Oct 5, 2012
    Vancouver, Canada
    Too true, Jim, too true. Sigh.

    Cheers:
    Jack
     
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  4. drd1135

    drd1135 Zen Snapshooter

    Mar 17, 2011
    Southwest Virginia
    Steve
    Amen, Brother.
     
  5. ccunningham

    ccunningham Mu-43 Veteran

    453
    Jul 23, 2010
    I remember when businesses didn't say they were open 24 hours on their menus, because they weren't open 24 hours.

    I remember when 11:00pm on a weekday was a "late" opening hour, and 12:00AM at the weekend.

    I remember when there no ATM cash dispensers.

    Credit cards had to be layered together with a triplicate carbon form that included the purchase price, and a big metal roller imprinted the card information onto the form.

    And the "drive-in" restaurant was one of those things my parents took me to only on rare and special occasions. To be honest I thought it was really special when I was a kid.

    So we all agree we feel old then?:smile:

    How do we feel about things being "better" back then?

    I'm beginning to be convinced that generally, things were some "better". But your mileage may vary.
     
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  6. snkenai

    snkenai Mu-43 Top Veteran

    523
    Sep 5, 2010
    Yeah, I remember.:smile: All those and more.

    How about the county grade school, with all 8 grades but only 8 students? I was in the 7th. Recess: was follow the leader around the rock bluff above the creek, wading or skating on the creek, or fox and dogs (kids not real dogs) through the local woods. No bus, no preschool, or kinder garden, right into the first grade, and walk to school.

    Dairy farm, but no electric milkers. No tractor, just the mules. Wood heating and cooking stove but no chain saw, just the 2 man/boy "crosscut" saw. I remember when electricity finally came the last 3/4 mile to our house. The good old days?

    What day is this???:confused:
     
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  7. ccunningham

    ccunningham Mu-43 Veteran

    453
    Jul 23, 2010
    I saw one of these fairly recently in the basement or toolshed at my grandfather's. Never had the joy of using one though, when I was a kid we lived in style, in our area you could get fuel oil AND LP gas delivered by truck. If the snow wasn't too deep. Of course, I also remember when the city population rolled from three digits to four when I was a teenager. Mainly because they redrew the city limits to include a larger area.:rofl:

    Let me rephrase my statement though, it seemed like people were a little happier, although I have to admit I don't have any data to back that up.
     
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  8. drp

    drp Mu-43 Regular

    78
    Dec 13, 2010
    Virginia, USA
    David
    Remember before there were drive ins?

    We had Gino's and Tops in Arlington, VA.
     
  9. Fmrvette

    Fmrvette This Space For Rent

    May 26, 2012
    Detroit, Michigan
    Jim
    When "banker's hours" really were bankers hours. 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Monday - Friday, no weekends, no late nights except for maybe Friday in order to deposit one's paycheck. No liquor sales on Sunday.

    When the bank teller remembered your name...

    When filling up the car and charging the fuel allowed time for the attendant(s) to clean the windows, check the oil and water under the hood, check the air pressure in the tires. (I remember buying Gulf gas at 19.9 cents per gallon during a 'gas price war' in Detroit).

    When the "car hops" wore roller skates (not roller blades) and cars had vent windows. And no air conditioning. A&W footlong hotdogs ruled...


    Experienced. The word is "experienced" :biggrin:.

    Ah some things better, some things not so much.

    Remote control for T.V. is better, I don't have to jump up and change the channels at my older sister's command anymore :thumbup:.

    Gas is more expensive but cars get better mileage and generally last longer. Plastic don't rust :biggrin:.:43:

    "Telephones" do more, but cost more - and the "handset" can't be used for crushing walnuts.

    Kid's toys do more, but the Erector Set still rocks.

    Postage stamps now cost 46 cents instead of 3 cents and letters take longer to get to their destination - but email is free and instantaneous. And when was the last time you sent a letter "air mail"??? EDIT: And when there were postal "zones" across the country and then everybody had to learn about "Zip Codes"???

    Kids are adept at keyboards...but can't read (and are not taught) cursive writing.

    Love letters aren't written anymore...especially with fountain pens. (I still have - and use - a fountain pen :eek:).

    Socially we are more (hopefully) understanding and accepting of each other - Internet flaming wars not withstanding.

    I wouldn't want to revisit the past if I had to stay there, but I keep a pair of rose colored glasses nearby with which I can relive the past without remembering the bad parts. (Ever roll a 1960's car with no seat belts and a metal dashboard? Ouch!).

    Regards,

    Jim

    (And now you have me hankerin' for an A&W hot dog...and it's snowing and I don't want to go outside :frown:).
     
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  10. mowog6000

    mowog6000 Mu-43 Regular

    126
    Mar 2, 2012
    Oregon City Oregon
    Pat bailey
    I don't miss buying albums at $5 a pop to get the one or two good songs off of and then spending hours making a tape for my car, today I have hundreds of songs in a little MP3 player than plugs into the car radio.
    I don't miss having to go to the library going through dozens of books to glean some info.
    I don't miss the LA smog that was so bad at times they wouldn't let you go out for recess.
    I don't miss seeing "Whites only" signs over restroom doors as I did when I went to visit my Grandmother in Alabama in the '50s.
    I don't miss the "Duck and cover" drills at school in case of nuclear attack.
    All in all I think things are much better now not perfect but better.
    And finally I really don't miss film.
     
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  11. ccunningham

    ccunningham Mu-43 Veteran

    453
    Jul 23, 2010
    ... and the psycho- and socio-paths and street gangs and home invasions. (As I recall these things never or hardly ever seemed to be a problem.)

    Now that I'm thinking about it, except for the rare event, there SEEMED to be A LOT less serious/violent crime back then. (Although again, I don't have a study to back that up.) But my parents didn't shield me from news about crime or other "troubling" news when I was younger, and even though we actually moved to an actual city when I was in school, I still don't remember there being as much serious crime as there seems to be now.

    And that includes when congress was in session.:rofl: Sorry, I couldn't resist.

    I can't be sure, but I might. I would have to think pretty hard about it, but I think I might seriously consider the option if it were available.

    However, a variety social issues have improved from where they were when I was a kid, so that is better.
     
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  12. foxtail1

    foxtail1 Science geek & photo nut

    Dec 30, 2011
    Southwest Virginia
    Kristi
    I remember most of those things, and really don't miss them.

    I love having the world at my fingertips. I remember having to drive 50 miles when I needed journals that were only available at another university library — now I can access them all from my home computer.

    I do remember 19¢ gas, and being outraged in 1973 when asked to pay 65¢/gallon on interstate 95.

    I definitely don't miss film!

    Fast food was a treat for us as children, maybe a few times a year.

    And, as to food, remember how little variety there was? Cheese was American, maybe hoop cheddar, and Swiss. I only knew blue cheese through those Kraft Roka spread (in the juice glass you could keep). Meat was hamburger, pork chops, roasts, and chicken. Fish...maybe flounder would be in the store on Fridays, but that's about it. There were no out of season fruits or vegetables, and Wonderbread was about the only choice. I don't remember ever seeing any other bread types. (My husband likes to add the poor beer selection to this list.)

    Like Fmrvette, I do use fountain pens for all my writing though, but I use modern pens (there are some amazing pens being made today).
     
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  13. ccunningham

    ccunningham Mu-43 Veteran

    453
    Jul 23, 2010
    I was ok with buying albums, sometimes there were really good tracks that never got airplay. It is handier now though.

    I kinda miss the library. I learned all kinds of cool, but often useless things there. And I often think that doing research that way helped me learn how to think about and solve problems, when there wasn't an easy solution to be found in a few seconds online.

    I didn't live in a big enough city to worry about smog.

    And while I lived in a rural area as a kid, there wasn't any of that "whites only" injustice around where I was. I was lucky to born north enough or late enough so that I was able to miss that.

    I was born late enough that we didn't worry with duck and cover anymore, everybody realized it wouldn't do any good.

    And I agree that some things ARE vastly improved. I think on the other hand, there are some things that have gotten worse. It's too bad we couldn't have JUST the improvements.

    I don't miss film, but that's because I can still buy and use it. For me it's a nice, though increasingly less popular alternative to digital.
     
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  14. juangrande

    juangrande Mu-43 Top Veteran

    805
    Dec 2, 2012
    COLORADO
    "Ever roll a 1960's car with no seat belts and a metal dashboard?"

    My sister did and was basically unharmed. A 1962 Chevy II Nova. It had air-conditioning (a really big deal in Louisiana) and a big permanent sticker on the rear window to let everyone know. Has anyone mentioned drive-in movies? We were a family of 6, I was the youngest, so consequently, I laid in the rear window "dash" space and fell asleep. Remember the 20lb speakers that hung on the window?
     
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  15. mowog6000

    mowog6000 Mu-43 Regular

    126
    Mar 2, 2012
    Oregon City Oregon
    Pat bailey
    We are a lot freer than we were even in the '60s. You could go to jail for many things that you don't today, take a 20 year old woman out of state to a motel and get caught.
    Swear in front of an adult audience like Lenny Bruce and go to jail.
    I remember traveling with my parents and the cops were stopping everyone and pulling able bodied men out of cars to fight a brush fire, my dad got out of it because my Mom didn't drive.

    I remember my sister couldn't wear shorts or pedal pushers in downtown San Diego

    I remember all the stores were closed on Sunday and I used to ride my bike around an empty Safeway parking lot.

    As for crime ,even back then there were certain parts of town you didn't go to and today we have news 24/7 so local shootings get more coverage. Back in the 1800s
    they were towns with only 20.000 people having a killing a day.
    I remember a guy I knew in the Navy would go out and rob homosexuals and it was OK with everyone.
    My family members in Alabama used the "N" word all the time ,no one thought anything about it.
    I think we are getting to be a better country and when the old haters die off and hopefully their views get rejected by the new generation it will be better.
     
  16. ccunningham

    ccunningham Mu-43 Veteran

    453
    Jul 23, 2010
    I do remember this. I'm not sure most cars even have that shelf under the rear window any more.

    The speakers were awesomely monaural. And directional since you only had one.
     
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  17. Fmrvette

    Fmrvette This Space For Rent

    May 26, 2012
    Detroit, Michigan
    Jim
    Glad she wasn't hurt; cars are much safer these days.

    My brother in law had a Chevy II with a V8 engine in that 'little' car. Changing the spark plugs was a trudge on that 283 as I recall.

    Drive in theaters ruled :2thumbs:. In the winter weather they would mount heaters along side the speakers... the fun part was watching someone drive off before remembering to take the speaker out of the window. Seemed to happen 2-3 times a summer at the BelAir theater in Detroit :biggrin:. Probably had something to do with the Stroh's beer smuggled into the show...

    Haven't been to a drive-in since 1984 or so. In, of course, the ubiquitous station wagon...

    NetFlix is sooooo much easier :biggrin:.

    Regards,

    Jim
     
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  18. Fmrvette

    Fmrvette This Space For Rent

    May 26, 2012
    Detroit, Michigan
    Jim
    I owe a huge debt to the librarians at the Monteith branch of the Detroit library who spent (what seems like now) incredible amounts of time teaching me how to research in the late 1950's / early 1960's.

    Monteith Branch | Detroit Public Library

    I lived about a mile and a half from there when I went to elementary school so it was within "walking distance" as defined by my parents :wink:.

    Certainly the Internet has moved things along, but I'll always have a soft spot for card catalogs :thumbup:.

    It may have paid off long-term for those very kind librarians - five decades later and I always vote "yes" on millage requests from the local library.

    Regards,

    Jim
     
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  19. mowog6000

    mowog6000 Mu-43 Regular

    126
    Mar 2, 2012
    Oregon City Oregon
    Pat bailey
    My library has a great online section where you can put a hold on books and they email you when they come in, I look at the new paperback section in stores and if I see a book I want to read I just take a picture of it and order it at the library. It sure beats paying $10 for a book you might not like.
    I used to hang out at the library all the time and remember one of my favorite sections was 629.00 which was airplanes and rockets.
     
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  20. Geoff3DMN

    Geoff3DMN Mu-43 Veteran

    I'm 52 and my Grandfather's farm had an electric milking machine (although it was much more basic than modern milking machines and required a lot of manual interaction) and a Ford tractor (which I wasn't allowed to drive *sigh*) in the early 60's.

    If I'm not being rude may I ask how old you are?
     
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