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Yongnuo-yn560-tx

Discussion in 'Lighting Forum' started by robbie36, Jun 17, 2014.

  1. robbie36

    robbie36 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 25, 2010
    Bangkok
    rob collins
    I thought this product deserved a thread of its own.

    http://flashhavoc.com/yongnuo-yn560-tx-revealed/

    They are available on Ebay at a price of around US$100.

    Most importantly I should point out that this transmitter is brand new. There dont seem to be any reviews out on it yet. I have ordered one so hopefully I will be able to post a mini review when I get and confirm it works with the M43 cameras although there is no reason why it shouldnt.

    For those who have the Yongnuo 560iii this transmitter is pretty exciting. The Yongnuo 560iiis has a built in receiver that works with this transmitter. In addition this transmitter allows you to set the power on each individual flash from the transmitter.
     
    • Like Like x 4
    • Informative Informative x 1
  2. Richella

    Richella The Wandering Scotsman

    267
    Aug 21, 2011
    Kuala Lumpur
    Excellent!! I've just receives my RF-603ii triggers and they worked so easily. If this works the same it will be excellent. Look forward to your review.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  3. noohoggin1

    noohoggin1 Instagram: @tomnguyenstudio

    324
    May 21, 2012
    MN
    Tom
    I'll be getting my hands on 2 (one for backup) for sure as I own 2 YN560iii's! It's about time....they've been hinting at this for a long time now! Can't wait...!
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. Timmy

    Timmy Mu-43 Regular

    110
    Dec 3, 2013
    Wiltshire - UK
    Are you sure they are available? I'm waiting for this too but Yongnuo haven't given a release date yet and could still be a while - those ebay listings look suspicious to me.
     
  5. robbie36

    robbie36 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 25, 2010
    Bangkok
    rob collins
    Well I do know from previous experience that Yongnuo ships first from 'ebay' 'Hong Kong'. I only ordered my today so we shall see. I will post once it has shipped or they tell me it isnt available yet.
     
  6. Qiou87

    Qiou87 Mu-43 Regular

    150
    Jul 15, 2013
    Paris, France
    Thanks for the news robbie, I had missed this announcement! I was beginning to wonder if Youngnuo had scratched this transmitter entirely given how it was supposed to be out by the end of 2013 initially.

    Anyway, I'm glad to see it takes a couple AA batteries instead of the weird small battery of the RF-602 transmitter I currently use. It'll be cheaper and easier to have spares!
     
  7. inkista

    inkista Mu-43 Veteran

    332
    Jan 13, 2012
    San Diego, CA
    Not from Yongnuo, though. If you read a bit farther down in the Flash Havoc thread, you'll note that there's someone out there pretending they're Yongnuo, and hiking up the prices pre-release. Most guesstimates are sometime by the end of July, and in the sub-$100 price range. Hell the TTL transmitter, the YN-622N-TX is only $55. I somehow don't think the manual YN-560TX will be much more than that.

    The official ebay store for YN is here: http://stores.ebay.com/hkyongnuophotoequipment

    And if you loathe the 'bay, probably the best storefront to grab YN gear, if you don't mind getting stuff shipped from China, and can't wait for it to be available in the US is thephotogadget.com. Any other listings, or any other sellers, and I take availability and pricing with a big grain of salt.

    My big question about the YN-560TX is whether or not it has a PC input port. The RF-602s used to have this, and I find it incredibly useful for when I feel like going Strobist with a P&S and an optical slave. It got removed on the RF-603s, and was not reinstated with the RF-603IIs, despite numerous early reports that it had. The final icing on the cake would be if the YN-560TX had a USB port for firmware updates, and whether or not it can do adjustable timing for "supersync" ("tail sync", "hypersync" for faster-than-sync-speed shooting) with manual lights. Unlikely, but given that I as a dual-system/Canon shooter am still waiting for the damn YN-622C-TX to arrive :), it's worth gossiping about. :)
     
  8. robbie36

    robbie36 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 25, 2010
    Bangkok
    rob collins
    So I have had my YN-560-TX for about a week and here is my quick review.

    If you want to know the bottom line - this unit has almost been put together flawlessly by Yongnuo. I do have a couple of small niggles that I will post at the end. Apart from that if you own Yongnuo 560 iii flashes that you use off camera you should just go out and buy this product. They are selling for as little as US$50.

    yong-1.

    I suspect everyone reading this basically knows what the unit is supposed to do. Act as a transmitter solely for the 560 iii manual flash. This makes use of the 560iii flash built in receiver with saves a whole lot of extra batteries, connections and general flash grief. It also allows you to control power direct and zoom of each individual flash directly from the transmitter and has 6 groups. It doesnt do anything magical like bring HSS or TTL to the flash of course. So why do I think it is so good for a product that really does no more that is written (or not) on the box? Well read on.

    The flash itself is pretty ugly. It comes in a cardboard box with an A4 sized piece of paper that is the manual. Its construction is the same quality as the Yongnuo 560iii which I think is extremely good for the price point. If you look at it, the controls bear a remarkable resemblance to the ones on the 560iii. It is also pretty big - basically roughly the same size as the 560iii without the flash head - it is actually about 1cm taller (to make room for the larger LCD) and 1cm thinner. It fits well onto the camera with a plastic tightening screw that is easier to use than on the flash.

    The controls look the same as the 560iii but the on/off is now a switch as opposed to the rather annoying press and hold button on the 560iii.

    Apart from the back controls, there is a slot on the side to take 2 x AA batteries (great, same as the flash). There is also another slot on the other side that has a small point to attach a lead (not included) so that you can use it with a wireless shutter remote. There is no PC sync port and no PC connection to enable firmware upgrades.

    There are a number 2x LED lights on the unit and LCD screen is lit green. The LCD green lit screen is very nicely executed - when ever you touch a button it lights up and then dims after 10 seconds - this is a vast improvement on the 560iii flash whereby you had to manually turn on the LCD light every time you wanted it to come on. The test button glows 'red' to show that the unit is powered up and thus insuring you dont leave the unit powered up after you have finished shooting. This visual reminder is lacking on my Cactus V5 receivers. There is a light top left that works in conjunction with a wireless shutter remote from Yongnuo (forgotten the spec number).

    The unit can also work with either the 602 or 603 receivers to trigger a non 560iii flash (but purely manually). There is a setting in the menu to choose either 602 or 603.

    It took me about 30 minutes to configure my 3 x 560iii flashes to work with the transmitter. It is not especially difficult but there dont seem to be any Youtube videos yet available to help. The manual is printed on one side of an A4 piece of paper. It isnt bad by Yongnuo standards which are incredibly low. About as intelligible as an Olympus manual. But it scores well for being incredibly brief.

    The setup syncing of the flash to the transmitter seems the tricky part. There is no obvious sound on LCD acknowledgement that they have 'paired'. The secret is that when they have paired you will see the 'Group' or more accurate 'Grp' appear on the flash LCD.

    But here is the good news. Once the transmitter and flashes are paired - this is only a one off setup. The flashes and the transmitter will remain paired. Switch them all off and come back 12 hours later and they are still paired. Take out all the batteries and replace them and they are still paired. In fact once you have been through the initial setup the only time you will have to touch the back of your flash is to turn it on and off. When you switch on your flash it defaults to it being used by the transmitter. All this is a huge deal for me., It is fantastic to simply switch on your camera and 3x flashes and be flashing away within 30 seconds. No more receivers batteries, on/offs, TX/RX switches, poor connections etc. It just works.

    On top of that the controls on the back of transmitter are intuitive and easy to use. Top left is a 'Group' button that cycles through 3 out of the 6 Groups automatically with the other 3 Groups accessible by a long press. I have 3x Yongnuo 560iii flash and assign each one to a different Group (a, b, c,) - this is part of the set up process.

    The second button is the 'Mode' button cycles through 'Manual', 'Multi' and 'blank'. I havent tried the multi mode and I doubt I ever will. The 'blank' mode is very useful as it lets you disable a flash (or group) from firing. Look ing at the LCD in my picture you can see that 'Group B' or flash 'B' is set to 'blank' which means it wont far. The third button toggles between power and zoom although power is default. The 4 arrow key pad will be used mostly for setting power - up[and down by +/- 0.3 EV, left/right by +1/-1 EV.

    I have tested the transmitters range up to 40m with no problems. Also triggered through a couple of walls very easily.

    And that is pretty much it. If anyone endures the hassle of putting 3 x speedlites, with receivers and batteries together they will really enjoy the ease and simplicity of this unit.

    So what are my niggles. Well they mostly concern the exterior design of the unit (well it is ugly isnt?) but I also dont like the way it is positioned 'upright' or 'vertically' on the a camera. This introduces a number of drawbacks...

    1) When you back it in your bag it virtually doubles the height of the camera which means you have to take it off each time.
    2) The vertical layout means that when you press a button you risk moving your tripod unless you hold it steady with one hand.
    3) The vertical layout means that there is no room for a hotshoes so it is not possible to use this unit with a flash attached on the top of the camera.

    Other than that Yongnuo have knocked it out the park on this one. I will never go back to flash units without a dedicated receiver or that dont offer remote power.
     
    • Like Like x 5
  9. robbie36

    robbie36 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 25, 2010
    Bangkok
    rob collins
    So I have had my YN-560-TX for about a week and here is my quick review.

    If you want to know the bottom line - this unit has almost been put together flawlessly by Yongnuo. I do have a couple of small niggles that I will post at the end. Apart from that if you own Yongnuo 560 iii flashes that you use off camera you should just go out and buy this product. They are selling for as little as US$50.

    yong-1.

    I suspect everyone reading this basically knows what the unit is supposed to do. Act as a transmitter solely for the 560 iii manual flash. This makes use of the 560iii flash built in receiver with saves a whole lot of extra batteries, connections and general flash grief. It also allows you to control power direct and zoom of each individual flash directly from the transmitter and has 6 groups. It doesnt do anything magical like bring HSS or TTL to the flash of course. So why do I think it is so good for a product that really does no more that is written (or not) on the box? Well read on.

    The flash itself is pretty ugly. It comes in a cardboard box with an A4 sized piece of paper that is the manual. Its construction is the same quality as the Yongnuo 560iii which I think is extremely good for the price point. If you look at it, the controls bear a remarkable resemblance to the ones on the 560iii. It is also pretty big - basically roughly the same size as the 560iii without the flash head - it is actually about 1cm taller (to make room for the larger LCD) and 1cm thinner. It fits well onto the camera with a plastic tightening screw that is easier to use than on the flash.

    The controls look the same as the 560iii but the on/off is now a switch as opposed to the rather annoying press and hold button on the 560iii.

    Apart from the back controls, there is a slot on the side to take 2 x AA batteries (great, same as the flash). There is also another slot on the other side that has a small point to attach a lead (not included) so that you can use it with a wireless shutter remote. There is no PC sync port and no PC connection to enable firmware upgrades.

    There are a number 2x LED lights on the unit and LCD screen is lit green. The LCD green lit screen is very nicely executed - when ever you touch a button it lights up and then dims after 10 seconds - this is a vast improvement on the 560iii flash whereby you had to manually turn on the LCD light every time you wanted it to come on. The test button glows 'red' to show that the unit is powered up and thus insuring you dont leave the unit powered up after you have finished shooting. This visual reminder is lacking on my Cactus V5 receivers. There is a light top left that works in conjunction with a wireless shutter remote from Yongnuo (forgotten the spec number).

    The unit can also work with either the 602 or 603 receivers to trigger a non 560iii flash (but purely manually). There is a setting in the menu to choose either 602 or 603.

    It took me about 30 minutes to configure my 3 x 560iii flashes to work with the transmitter. It is not especially difficult but there dont seem to be any Youtube videos yet available to help. The manual is printed on one side of an A4 piece of paper. It isnt bad by Yongnuo standards which are incredibly low. About as intelligible as an Olympus manual. But it scores well for being incredibly brief.

    The setup syncing of the flash to the transmitter seems the tricky part. There is no obvious sound on LCD acknowledgement that they have 'paired'. The secret is that when they have paired you will see the 'Group' or more accurate 'Grp' appear on the flash LCD.

    But here is the good news. Once the transmitter and flashes are paired - this is only a one off setup. The flashes and the transmitter will remain paired. Switch them all off and come back 12 hours later and they are still paired. Take out all the batteries and replace them and they are still paired. In fact once you have been through the initial setup the only time you will have to touch the back of your flash is to turn it on and off. When you switch on your flash it defaults to it being used by the transmitter. All this is a huge deal for me., It is fantastic to simply switch on your camera and 3x flashes and be flashing away within 30 seconds. No more receivers batteries, on/offs, TX/RX switches, poor connections etc. It just works.

    On top of that the controls on the back of transmitter are intuitive and easy to use. Top left is a 'Group' button that cycles through 3 out of the 6 Groups automatically with the other 3 Groups accessible by a long press. I have 3x Yongnuo 560iii flash and assign each one to a different Group (a, b, c,) - this is part of the set up process.

    The second button is the 'Mode' button cycles through 'Manual', 'Multi' and 'blank'. I havent tried the multi mode and I doubt I ever will. The 'blank' mode is very useful as it lets you disable a flash (or group) from firing. Look ing at the LCD in my picture you can see that 'Group B' or flash 'B' is set to 'blank' which means it wont fire. The third button toggles between power and zoom although power is default. The 4 arrow key pad will be used mostly for setting power - up and down by +/- 0.3 EV, left/right by +1/-1 EV.

    I have tested the transmitters range up to 40m with no problems. Also triggered through a couple of walls very easily.

    And that is pretty much it. If anyone endures the hassle of putting 3 x speedlites, with receivers and batteries together they will really enjoy the ease and simplicity of this unit.

    So what are my niggles. Well they mostly concern the exterior design of the unit (well it is ugly isnt?) but I also dont like the way it is positioned 'upright' or 'vertically' on the a camera. This introduces a number of drawbacks...

    1) When you pack it in your bag it virtually doubles the height of the camera which means you have to take it off each time.
    2) The vertical layout means that when you press a button you risk moving your tripod unless you hold it steady with one hand.
    3) The vertical layout means that there is no room for a hotshoe so it is not possible to use this unit with a flash attached on the top of the camera.

    Other than that Yongnuo have knocked it out the park on this one. I will never go back to flash units without a dedicated receiver or that dont offer remote power.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  10. Richella

    Richella The Wandering Scotsman

    267
    Aug 21, 2011
    Kuala Lumpur
    Which version of the trigger did you buy? Was it the canon or Nikon?


    Sent from my iPad using Mu-43
     
  11. robbie36

    robbie36 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 25, 2010
    Bangkok
    rob collins
    Well strangely enough it doesnt say at all - not on the trigger, not on the box and not in the manual. I initially assumed that they had only produced a single unit. But closer examination of the 5 pins on the base of the unit shows that mine was designed for Canon. Of course the only pin you are really using with an EM1 is the center pin.

    This is what the manual says about the extra functions of the dedicated Canon/Nikon units.....

    'When the controller is used for non-dedicated cameras, it wont support waking the flash up from camera and the triggering function will be unrestricted'

    I imagine the unrestricted trigger allows you to fire the flash even when your shutter is above its sync speed. I have turned off the 'sleep' function on my 560s, so waking them up is a non-issue for me.
     
  12. Richella

    Richella The Wandering Scotsman

    267
    Aug 21, 2011
    Kuala Lumpur
    Thanks Robbie. I asked because I read a lot about the nikon version of the RF603 version 1 radio triggers not working on the Olympus without modification. This was resolved on the RF603ii because they added a switch where you could select TX mode only. Therefore i deduce there was some issue on the Nikon version of the triggers related to the TX/Rx combined mode.

    I think I'll buy the canon version to be sure.


    Sent from my iPad using Mu-43
     
  13. MikeWhitten

    MikeWhitten Mu-43 Regular

    58
    Dec 29, 2012
    Hi,

    Thanks for posting this! I wonder - would you test the max sync speed before black bars appear in the photo?

    Thanks much,
    Mike
     
  14. jomerads

    jomerads Mu-43 Veteran

    223
    Mar 27, 2013
    Moorestown, New Jersey
    John S.
    Rob,

    Can you show us the front, top and the sides of this unit?


    Thanks,

    John S.
     
  15. inkista

    inkista Mu-43 Veteran

    332
    Jan 13, 2012
    San Diego, CA
    Actually, the issue happened with either version (Canon or Nikon). The radio protocol is identical--the only difference is the pin layout on the foot to get the proper TTL signal to transmit the "wake-up" signal. The 603s were using a non-sync pin signal to determine if the unit was on a flash or on a camera, and since that signal wasn't there on a non-Nikon-or-Canon hotshoe, the unit never switched into Tx mode. The RF-602 (which has dedicated Rx/Tx units) and Cactus V (which has a Tx/Rx switch on it) never had this issue. This is also why the 603 Mk I units' test button could not be used in-hand to control remote lights from a light meter--the Tx unit had to be on the camera hotshoe.

    It was actually far easier to mod the Canon version of the 603 Mk I to be mft/Fuji compatible because the contacts are identically placed to those two hotshoe layouts. The Nikon version required not-quite-seating the modified Tx unit so the right pin could make contact.

    With all of the post-622 triggering units, Yongnuo appears to be aware that folks are liable to try and use this gear on mirrorless cameras, and have built in the ability to force Tx mode. And, obviously, the dedicated TX units are TX-only all the time. :D My YN-622C triggers, for example, have always worked as manual-only triggers on my mft gear, and with the YN-622C-TX unit, can now be used with my GX-7 to control my 580EXII and YN-568EX's manual power levels, zoom, and turning groups on/off. I'd assume the YN-560-TX works similarly with YN-560IIIs.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  16. robbie36

    robbie36 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 25, 2010
    Bangkok
    rob collins
    Highest max sync speed is 1/320s although I did shoot this at 1/400s a couple of days ago and the ambient light meant the black bar didnt show.

    yong-11.
     
    • Like Like x 4
  17. robbie36

    robbie36 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 25, 2010
    Bangkok
    rob collins
    Ok here the other pics. Forgot the top. Not much to see.

    yong-4.

    The slot here is for 2xAA batteries

    yong-2.

    The slot here contains a whole for a lead to use with 603 or 602 wireless shutter

    yong-3.

    Nothing the light flashes
     
    • Like Like x 1
  18. Timmy

    Timmy Mu-43 Regular

    110
    Dec 3, 2013
    Wiltshire - UK
    thanks for the review - I'll be ordering mine shortly!
     
  19. MikeWhitten

    MikeWhitten Mu-43 Regular

    58
    Dec 29, 2012
    Thanks much!
     
  20. arch stanton

    arch stanton Mu-43 Veteran

    411
    Feb 25, 2012
    London
    Malc
    Slightly weird idea for the camera height/button-pushing niggles - would the transmitter stlil work on the end of a (cheap Canon) TTL cable?
    I've used one to de-couple a Nissin di466 from my camera body, figured it might keep a hotshoe transmitter working off the camera too.