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YIKES!

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by dixeyk, Feb 6, 2016.

  1. dixeyk

    dixeyk Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 9, 2010
    Was changing lenses and my ring finger decided to drop into the camera and plant itself firmly on the sensor. Luckily it appears there is a thin glass (plastic) cover on the sensor and I was able to gently wipe away with a lens cloth the tiny smudge left by my finger tip. Shot a few afterward and there doesn't seem to be any issues.

    In as long as I have been shooting digital I have never done that before...and I hope to never do it again.
     
  2. stratokaster

    stratokaster Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 4, 2011
    Kyiv, Ukraine
    Pavel
    LOL. Your sensor (or, to be precise, the glass cover in front of it) is REALLY tough. It's very difficult to damage it. And contrary to popular belief, cleaning the sensor is really easy. I have always cleaned sensors in my cameras with regular Q-tips and face lotion (yes, really) without any ill effects. If somebody tells you you should never touch the sensor cover and use only specially designed products to clean it, know that this person is spreading FUD and probably intends to sell you an unnecessarily expensive cleaning kit.

    Take a look at this old thread: I tried to destroy the sensor, I really did!
     
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  3. dixeyk

    dixeyk Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 9, 2010
    That's good to know, I hit it with a lens cloth then blew it out and it seems fine. There appears to be a tiny speck on the glass but I'm going to sweat it. I can't see it on any of the images so far.
     
  4. Nawty

    Nawty Mu-43 Regular

    83
    May 1, 2015
    However...

    If your camera has IBIS then you could have knackered it, or so the manufacturers would have you believe (I don't know, I've cleaned DSLR sensors many a time but have always been told cameras with IBIS need to be sent away as you need a tool to immobilise the sensor so you don't kill the IBIS)
     
  5. dixeyk

    dixeyk Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 9, 2010
    It's too late now...besides, I tested it and IBIS seems to be working just fine allowing me to hand hold at 1/5th a second. I immobilized the sensor with the power of my hate. Amazingly effective for camera repairs.

    I took a good close up look at the spot on the sensor/glass and its not something I left. Looks to be a little pink dot of something actually on the glass...maybe from manufacture. It's perfectly round like a droplet of of some sort of adhesive and not some random bit of gunk off my finger. I don't possess powers like that.

    This is one of those crossroads where its super easy to drift into obsessing about something that is really pretty minor in the grand scheme of things. I decided I simply don't care enough to sweat it. Time to go out and make some more images, besides it's going to get beat up over my time of ownership, its not a museum piece.
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2016
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  6. dornblaser

    dornblaser Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 13, 2012
    Chicago-area
    David Dornblaser
    I feel for you, worst nightmare other than dropping on to something hard.
     
  7. dixeyk

    dixeyk Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 9, 2010
    Been there, done that. It was my X-E1 and XF35. Really, the worst part was that I got a lot less for it than I could have when I sold it. I still made some nice images with it after the "incident".

    Funny thing is that almost everything in my life is dented, dinged or otherwise marred. Hell, even my dog is permanently missing a toenail. It's just part of life. I've always figure it's a sign you're actually living.

    I appreciate the sentiment but its far from my worst nightmare...when I was told I had cancer ranks pretty high up there. This is more just an eye roll because you know you just did something stupid. On the camera front I have a lovely Olympus Pen-F 38 in like new condition that I decided to have a go at cleaning the oily aperture blades on. I got the oil off but managed to wreck the spring that controls the aperture. THAT kinda bummed me out more because of how long I spent tracking down that f***ing lens.
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2016
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  8. stratokaster

    stratokaster Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 4, 2011
    Kyiv, Ukraine
    Pavel
    LOL, that's what I did to my X-E2 which is literally 2 months old. Dropped it and cracked both the screen and the rear shell. It was obviously an out-of-warranty repair, but at least it was not outrageously expensive and the turnover time was just 5 days.
     
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  9. dornblaser

    dornblaser Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 13, 2012
    Chicago-area
    David Dornblaser
    Sorry about the cancer, I hope that it is in remission; real life patina is totally different.
     
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  10. dixeyk

    dixeyk Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 9, 2010
    Oh, I'm fine...14 years clear this past Fall. It's what keeps me from getting too worked up about less important things.
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2016
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  11. heli-mech

    heli-mech Mu-43 Top Veteran

    959
    Mar 9, 2012
    Vancouver Island, Canada
    Andrew
    Lotion?
     
  12. Turbofrog

    Turbofrog Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Mar 21, 2014
    I've done multiple wet cleans of my Panasonic and Samsung ILCs with no issues at all. I did buy the little Visible Dust cleaning swabs because I'd never done it before and for $15 they make the whole process incredibly easy, as they are flat wipes shaped specifically for the width of the sensor.

    I'm sure you could just use 99% isopropyl alcohol from the drug store and a Q-tip and it would work nearly as well, though. The only trouble is the little fluffies that the Q-tips can deposit, since that kind of defeats the purpose of the exercise...
     
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  13. robcee

    robcee Mu-43 Veteran

    289
    Jan 10, 2016
    Toronto
    Rob Campbell
    dood! fingers stay on the outside! don't get yer finger juice on the sensor.

    ...

    then again, maybe you've hit on a new creative effect!

    rock the smudge, compadre.

    adios!
     
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  14. dixeyk

    dixeyk Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 9, 2010
    Checking back in...I decided to have a go wth some swabs and 99% isopropyl alcohol. Let me go on record as saying what a huge PITA that was. It took me forever to get it so it wouldn't smudge. I finally managed it AND removed the little pink dot in the process. The IBIS is still working and the sensor look clean.

    A few tips...

    1. Not all swabs are created equal. The little foam swabs streak more
    2. Wrapping a little chamois at the end of a Q-Tip works great to get the last little streaks off
    3. One you get it looking good DO NOT GO FOR THAT LAST LITTLE SPEC YOU THINK YOU SEE because you'll be starting over
    4. Avoid jamming your finger into the sensor in the future
     
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  15. John M Flores

    John M Flores Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 7, 2011
    Somerville, NJ
    I've cleaned several Pentax cameras with sensor-based shake reduction with no ill effects.

    "It puts the lotion on the skin..." Name that movie.
     
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  16. cptobvious

    cptobvious Mu-43 Veteran

    238
    Jan 8, 2013
    Sensor cleaning is not difficult, even on the Olympus bodies, but you really need the right tools. Using a cleaner like isopropyl alcohol (let alone lotion...yikes) will leave streaks and/or residue, and Q-tips leave behind dust. It can take a long time to clean all that up, but if you use the right tools it takes seconds.

    The service centers use methanol, which you can buy as Eclipse solution, because it evaporates quickly without the streaking/residue if used correctly. Since it's toxic stuff, gloves and ventilation are highly recommended. Instead of Q-tips, I use dust-free disposable wipes like Pec Pads. There are plastic sensor swabs that you can buy and re-use with Pec Pads. Basically you put a few drops of Eclipse on the Pec Pad on the swab and wipe in one motion from edge to edge. I use the same techniques for cleaning lens rear elements.
     
  17. dixeyk

    dixeyk Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 9, 2010
    I'll pick up some of the right stuff. I managed to get it cleaned up (eventually) but it was a hassle.
     
  18. pellicle

    pellicle Mu-43 All-Pro

    Feb 10, 2010
    Southport, OzTrailEYa
    pellicle
    yeah ... I had a sudden sneeze during pollen season once ... put grot onto the sensor ... led me to make my own sensor cleaning swab ... which worked well.
     
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  19. robcee

    robcee Mu-43 Veteran

    289
    Jan 10, 2016
    Toronto
    Rob Campbell
    Cartman playing "Lambs", from South Park. :D

    I've never cleaned an Olympus sensor, haven't had to yet. I have made a mess of a Nikon sensor a few years ago though. This particular model (a D300) had a really thin plastic film over the sensors which is easily damaged if you put too much pressure on it. I think it was the IR filter for that system.

    At any rate, make sure the sensor's easily cleanable before you go sticking q-tips and swabs in there! Otherwise, bring it to a shop that knows what they're doing. A $50 sensor cleaning is cheaper than a replacement camera.
     
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  20. drd1135

    drd1135 Zen Snapshooter

    Mar 17, 2011
    Southwest Virginia
    Steve
    Just to mention the opposing viewpoint, you may have missed your excuse to buy the Pen F. :flowers_2:
     
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