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Winter Moth

Discussion in 'Nature' started by DrLazer, Dec 19, 2011.

  1. DrLazer

    DrLazer Mu-43 Regular

    93
    Mar 23, 2011
    Sheffield, UK
    Only one image of this moth I am afraid. I'm not sure what size moths have to be to be classed as "micro-moths" or "macro-moths". I would guess this one is a micro moth. Photographed through a 10x Nikon Achromat 0.25, Nikon SB24 for lighting and plasticine for the background.

    Christmas haircut?


    White Headed Moth by Craig.Taylor, on Flickr

    Click the Facebook Like button! Not seen that bad-boy before. :p
     
    • Like Like x 5
  2. Luke

    Luke Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jul 30, 2010
    Milwaukee, WI
    Luke
    Hey Craig,
    Is that "horn" thing out front his nose? Awesome work as usual!
     
  3. DrLazer

    DrLazer Mu-43 Regular

    93
    Mar 23, 2011
    Sheffield, UK
    It's the "cream-horn" duhhh
     
  4. DrLazer

    DrLazer Mu-43 Regular

    93
    Mar 23, 2011
    Sheffield, UK
    If you wanted a serious answer .... I believe it is a mouthpart used for sorting food before it eats it. the curly thing at the front is the proboscis, which works like a straw ... it sucks up tasty stuff and then the horn like object sorts it for digestion. Something like that anyway, I think "labial palp" or something similar is the correct name. This is the first arthropod I have ever seen with scaled mouthparts - very interesting (to me anyway)
     
  5. grebeman

    grebeman Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 13, 2010
    South Brent, south Devon (UK)
    Barrie
    Craig,
    Confusingly there is no hard and fast rule, so some micros are bigger than some macros. generally the micros are considered to be more primitive with many of them not having evolved a proboscis, so I guess the jury is out on that one, I wouldn't like to hazard a guess at it's identity from that excellent close up.

    Barrie
     
    • Like Like x 1
  6. DrLazer

    DrLazer Mu-43 Regular

    93
    Mar 23, 2011
    Sheffield, UK
    Thanks for the info!.
    I'm pretty sure it is Swammerdamia caesiella. When I read the description for that moth is meets every single characteristic. Except ..... It's not August. If the ID is correct then obviously they exist much later than the books suggest, if the ID is incorrect it must be something very similar ... as to what though, I am at a loss.
     
  7. Luke

    Luke Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jul 30, 2010
    Milwaukee, WI
    Luke
    you're a cream-horn.
    How many shots in this stack?
     
  8. DrLazer

    DrLazer Mu-43 Regular

    93
    Mar 23, 2011
    Sheffield, UK
    ermmmm .... i didnt check. Probably about 80ish I think the magnification is only around 8:1
     
  9. grebeman

    grebeman Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 13, 2010
    South Brent, south Devon (UK)
    Barrie
    There are normally two broods per year and the second should have pupated by the end of October to overwinter as a pupa. There have been instances of third broods of certain species due to the very mild Autumn and I would suggest that if it is this species it's more likely to be an unusual instance of a third brood.

    Barrie
     
    • Like Like x 1
  10. RT_Panther

    RT_Panther Mu-43 Legend

    May 4, 2011
    Texas
    Awesome macro work here!:cool:
     
  11. DrLazer

    DrLazer Mu-43 Regular

    93
    Mar 23, 2011
    Sheffield, UK
    @ Grebeman

    superb and informative info. how come you're Mr. Moth then? I proper <3 moths. :)