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Windows Backup Software for Travel?

Discussion in 'Accessories' started by oldracer, Sep 19, 2016.

  1. oldracer

    oldracer Mu-43 All-Pro

    Oct 1, 2010
    USA
    I am considering buying a small convertible tablet/laptop for email, books reading, etc. when traveling. I am wondering if there is a photo backup program that would let me also use a SD card in the laptop for backing up my camera SD cards, which I rotate every day. Right now I have eight cards in rotation and I leave my images on the cards. So as I rotate, each card might have images from two or even three days.

    I would set up the laptop so there was a folder for each camera card, then in the evening I would take the day's card out of the camera and back it up. So, for example, on day 9 my first card would have both day 1 and day 9 photos on it and the day 1 photos would already have been backed up to the card's folder. (I hope this is clear.)

    So .. I would want the backup software to recognize files that were already in the folder and not write over them. I would also (of course) want both JPG and RAW files backed up.

    I have a Sanho Colorspace backup device now and it functions this way. It is a little heavy and bulky though, and single-purpose. Hence my idea to use a laptop.

    TIA
     
  2. budeny

    budeny Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 4, 2014
    Boulder, CO
    Code:
    robocopy /e
    You can also add couple lines of shell script to take card serial number and utilize it in backup location..
     
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  3. tkbslc

    tkbslc Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    To prevent confusion and mistakes, I would recommend using a single larger backup destination for all cards. Then you don't have to keep track of which days are backed up on which cards, nor do you have to worry about accidentally overwriting your primary copy of the images already on the card. You'd merely do a simple copy job to the backup destination.

    1TB USB hard drives are quite cheap and light, but If you don't want to pack something that large, you can get USB flash drives in 256GB capacity for $50 or so. Or you may look for a laptop option with room for a internal hard drive, in which case 750GB+ is quite easy and cheap.
     
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2016
  4. dalto

    dalto Mu-43 Regular

    186
    Jul 6, 2016
    Texas
    If you use LR than just install it on the laptop and use the import function without deleting and then you can just merge the catalogs them when you get home.

    If you just want to copy the cards to your local hard drive there are about a 100 ways you can do that but the simplest would simply be to drag and drop the the contents of the card to the folder. By default windows will copy between devices. It will ask if you want to overwrite and you can just say "no".
     
  5. oldracer

    oldracer Mu-43 All-Pro

    Oct 1, 2010
    USA
    Thanks for the thoughts. The reason for separate folders for each card is that then it is easy to deal with a situation where a card fails or gets lost or is in a camera that gets stolen. I don't have to pick through all the files to get the ones on the lost card. That said, Lightroom would take care of that for me anyway if I import from the backup SD rather than the camera SDs, because I could use its feature of sorting files by date. So ... something to think about.

    Re backup, I just checked folders from a recent Africa trip and my total storage for the trip was about 40GB. So it looks like a 64GB SD would be enough for me. At home, I have a 1TB RAID NAS box that gets periodically backed up to a 4TB SATA drive that is kept in my gun safe. So I'm pretty well covered once I get home.
     
  6. barry13

    barry13 Super Moderator; Photon Wrangler

    Mar 7, 2014
    Southern California
    Barry
    I normally use an Orthogonal File Manager such as Total Commander... copy to a folder for each SD card... it's easy to identify new or not yet copied files with the Compare operation, or just skip overwrites.

    Also easy to skip JPEG or RAW files if you were low on space, etc.
     
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  7. dalto

    dalto Mu-43 Regular

    186
    Jul 6, 2016
    Texas
    On my last trip I took a small laptop and LR with me.

    The advantage of this approach was that not only could I import the photos in LR to get backup copies onto the laptop but when I had time, I could tag the photos in LR while I was traveling. This was very helpful as I took over 7000 photos and it would have been difficult to remember everything after the fact. It also meant that when I got home I could process the photos I wanted to process without having to worrying about labeling everything.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. tkbslc

    tkbslc Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    It sounded to me like you wanted to use half the capacity of each card as backup space for photos from another card. That's what I was suggesting you avoid because it would be easy to make mistakes and the cards contain primary copies of files. Having separate folders for each card you backup is not a bad idea, just make them all on one target, rather than spread to other cards.

    If you used 40GB on your last trip, then 128GB would be plenty for anything. You can get small 128GB USB drives for $30. I am recommending a USB drive instead of another SD because then it is obvious where your backups are and it can't be placed in a camera and accidentally overwritten. Also, if your laptop has an internal card reader, you can go from card reader to USB drive directly. They are also a bit more durable.
     
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2016
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  9. PacNWMike

    PacNWMike Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Dec 5, 2014
    Salish Sea
    guess?
    I use a transformer tablet too. No additional software required. I just carry a large thumb drive and upload to that using the same software I use for previewing (Faststone). It will only transfer new files or copy files adding a unique name. My wife carries the thumb drive to keep a separate backup. On longer trips I carry a little HD as well for other things as well as photos. I'll never carry a laptop again after using the little tablet.
     
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  10. oldracer

    oldracer Mu-43 All-Pro

    Oct 1, 2010
    USA
    Nope. Sorry I was not clear. The camera cards are my primary image storage and they are not used for anything else. The tablet/laptop has a microSD slot where I'm thinking of putting a 64GB card that would be the backup destination for all the camera cards.

    Worth looking into. I see four flavors of Faststone (FastStone Image Viewer, Screen Capture, Photo Resizer ...) -- which one are you using/do you recommend?

    Re just using Lightroom on the road, I don't work with my images when traveling. I'm usually tired by the end of the day plus doing that kind of dog work during time that is costing me a lot of dollars per waking hour just doesn't seem cost-effective to me. I'd rather spend those expensive hours taking advantage of my destination, looking, learning ... YMMV of course.
     
  11. PacNWMike

    PacNWMike Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Dec 5, 2014
    Salish Sea
    guess?


    I find Faststone Image Viewer plenty capable and a small footprint. I have the ASUS T100 and would never try to run LR on it. Life is too short. My version of the T100 only has a 64gb HD so I use the slot for a fast 64gb µSD card and use it like another HD. Your backup idea would work too. I use the full sized USB3 slot on the keyboard for the thumb drive or plugging in my little WD Elements drive which I use for longer car trips. Actually a couple of 128gb thumb drives would be plenty if schlepping you bags. Get a µ to full size USB adapter. I also carry a CAT5 adapter for wired internet if stuck with sketchy wireless. Not uncommon where we go.

    And I notice a new version of Faststone is available...