Wildlife Photo Critique Thread

Discussion in 'Nature' started by Phocal, Jun 25, 2016.

  1. Phocal

    Phocal Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jan 3, 2014
    a
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2017
    • Like Like x 3
  2. barry13

    barry13 Super Moderator; Photon Wrangler Subscribing Member

    Mar 7, 2014
    Southern California
    Barry
    Hi, What about wild birds perched on fences?
     
    • Funny Funny x 1
  3. Phocal

    Phocal Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jan 3, 2014
    a
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2017
  4. kevinparis

    kevinparis Cantankerous Scotsman Subscribing Member

    Feb 12, 2010
    Gent, Belgium
    Phocal

    shooting wildlife has not always been part of my portfolio.. but I have found myself doing more of it over the last few years, partly due to locations and partly due to investing in the technology required

    Something I have admired in your work is that you seem more dedicated than many in taking visually interesting images of wildlife as opposed to merely recording their presence.

    Taking a photograph and creating an image to me are two separate processes.. both are valid... but I know which I prefer

    that said I offer for critique a slightly smaller creature which may or may not be related to your gator

    26097876064_3379865296_b. P4280062 by kevinparis, on Flickr

    K
     
    • Like Like x 4
  5. barry13

    barry13 Super Moderator; Photon Wrangler Subscribing Member

    Mar 7, 2014
    Southern California
    Barry
    Great... I asked because I some don't consider photos with fences and other man-made objects to be 'natural'...

    I was standing at the back door looking for birds when I saw this Black Phoebe above on the patio cover, with a moth in its beak. Then it flew onto the fence and I was able to get a bunch of shots off...
    EB144517.

    EB144518.

    EB144519.
    All 40-150mm + MC-14 @210mm, f4, cropped.

    I didn't do any PP other than Raw Therapee's defaults plus a little sharpening and a heavy crop.

    Barry
     
    • Like Like x 4
    • Winner Winner x 2
    • Agree Agree x 1
  6. Phocal

    Phocal Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jan 3, 2014
    a
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2017
    • Agree Agree x 1
  7. Phocal

    Phocal Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jan 3, 2014
    a
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2017
    • Like Like x 1
  8. PacNWMike

    PacNWMike Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Dec 5, 2014
    Salish Sea
    Good idea for a thread. OK, here goes.

    First of all it is a very good capture. I like the gator's POV. And Agree with the decision to crop...I'd even play with 16:9. I'm sensitive about horizon/verticals and centering. I think you got it.

    However personally I'm not a fan of the Velvia look. Never used it. Way too over-the-top IMHO. I'd back the saturation off a bunch and maybe play with the curves...



    FWIW as a reference, my monitor is profiled and my photos as posted appear a bit more washed out than they do when I'm in the editor.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  9. kevinparis

    kevinparis Cantankerous Scotsman Subscribing Member

    Feb 12, 2010
    Gent, Belgium
    Interesting shots... but my suggestion is that you work a little in PP with contrast and sharpening to give a little more punch to the image

    K
     
    • Useful Useful x 1
  10. Phocal

    Phocal Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jan 3, 2014
    a
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2017
    • Like Like x 1
  11. Phocal

    Phocal Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jan 3, 2014
    a
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2017
    • Informative Informative x 1
    • Appreciate Appreciate x 1
  12. kevinparis

    kevinparis Cantankerous Scotsman Subscribing Member

    Feb 12, 2010
    Gent, Belgium
    Phocal

    thanks for taking time to offer your thoughts. I come from a graphic design background, and am a regular user of the rule of thirds, though it was well into my interest in photography that I realised I had been doing it naturally before I had the benefit of the onscreen grids

    That shot was taken on the first day I had the 300 and this was really a test shot testing out the operating parameters of the lens

    appreciate your comments

    cheers

    K
     
    • Appreciate Appreciate x 1
  13. Phocal

    Phocal Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jan 3, 2014
    a
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2017
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • Appreciate Appreciate x 1
  14. Phocal

    Phocal Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jan 3, 2014
    a
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2017
    • Agree Agree x 2
    • Informative Informative x 1
    • Appreciate Appreciate x 1
  15. barry13

    barry13 Super Moderator; Photon Wrangler Subscribing Member

    Mar 7, 2014
    Southern California
    Barry
    @Phocal@Phocal, Thanks Ronnie! That looks much better.

    I have a lot to learn with PP... I do still have the raw file and will definitely give it another try.
    I'll let you know if I get stuck :)

    Barry
     
    • Like Like x 1
  16. Phocal

    Phocal Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jan 3, 2014
    a
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2017
    • Like Like x 1
  17. oldracer

    oldracer Mu-43 Hall of Famer Subscribing Member

    Oct 1, 2010
    USA
    Interesting concept for a thread. Here's one of my favorites from an African trip a few years ago. Compositionwise it's kind of boring; it is the cat's eyes that grab me. The 500 yard stare, watching for lunch!

    full.
     
    • Like Like x 3
  18. kevinparis

    kevinparis Cantankerous Scotsman Subscribing Member

    Feb 12, 2010
    Gent, Belgium
    Oldracer

    there is a better composition in there... you just have to fine tune things a bit to get the diagonal lines of the branch and the leopards back anchoring more into the bottom corners

    The other thing is the rather dull, low contrast look... its a dramatic animal, and it needs a little oomph. There is no substitute to learning the basic manipulations of PP, learning how to read a histogram and how the various controls effect the image.

    From just the jpeg post here, and maybe 5 mins in PP, I came up with this

    Leopard_In_Tree (1).

    cheers

    K
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Agree Agree x 2
  19. PacNWMike

    PacNWMike Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Dec 5, 2014
    Salish Sea
    @oldracer@oldracer I would crop to reduce the foreground blur and move the eyes out of the center of the photo...just my 2¢
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  20. David A

    David A Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 30, 2011
    Brisbane, Australia
    Agree strongly. I like having diagonals running out at the corners. I used to think they would lead the eye out of the frame but they always seem to lead the eye into the frame. I first started working with diagonals running into the corners after reading an article online somewhere about Cartier-Bresson's compositional techniques and it was one of the things he often did.

    It works and it works a hell of a lot better than the rule of thirds as a compositional guide.

    What I think works really nicely in this case is that not only do the diagonals meet off centre at right angles but the leopard's head is above the line of it's body and falls onto the line of the diagonal of the tree trunk so the 2 diagonals end up reinforcing each other very strongly.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Informative Informative x 1
    • Appreciate Appreciate x 1