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Wide angle 7-14 Oly or Pana?

Discussion in 'Native Lenses' started by woollyback, Mar 22, 2016.

  1. woollyback

    woollyback Mu-43 Veteran

    203
    Oct 20, 2015
    Rob
    Folks,

    Its time for a wide angle to partner my 12-40 on the EM1

    I like to shoot as wide as possible hence the above choices, I cant ever see me worrying about f2.8 vs f4 at that focal length so which to choose??

    Any views or experiences good or bad will be great

    Thanks

    Rob
     
  2. DHart

    DHart Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jan 7, 2010
    Scottsdale, Arizona
    Don
    They're both awesome lenses. I happen to have the 7-14 f/4 and with a lens such as this, I generally like to make use of the inherent DOF, thus I typically shoot it around f/8 or so. I prefer the smaller form-factor and would rarely need the lens to be f/2.8. And, for the most part, I treat the lens as though it were a 7mm prime lens. I rarely zoom it at all. I bought it for 7mm and 7mm is where I tend to stay with it.

    I'd say in the choosing, if you're primarily an outdoors/landscape shooter and prefer a lighter-weight, more compact form factor - go with the 7-14 Pany.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    On the other hand, if you're more interested in capturing dimly lit interiors, you need an f/2.8 aperture, don't mind the extra cost, and you don't mind a good bit of extra size and weight, go with the Oly 7-14.

    You won't go wrong with either choice. Either way you go, shooting at 7mm is a huge thrill! Once you get the hang of it, you'll be hooked!

    I also have the Oly 9-18 and really enjoy that lens, as well.
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2016
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  3. woollyback

    woollyback Mu-43 Veteran

    203
    Oct 20, 2015
    Rob
    Don,

    Many thanks for that - it would be outdoors so no low light stuff.

    How do you protect the lens front element as I guess filters are a no go?

    Thanks

    Rob
     
  4. DHart

    DHart Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jan 7, 2010
    Scottsdale, Arizona
    Don
    Rob... I so rarely use filters (ND is about all that I would choose) that I haven't missed not using them on this lens. Some people have found ways to use filters behind the lens, something you can search on.

    The built-in hood on the 7-14/4 does offer some protection to the front element of the lens.

    I have felt no need to use filters to 'protect' a lens. I have no desire to put cheap glass in front of expensive glass. In a good number of decades as a commercial photographer, I've only had damage to the front of a lens once. That's with having owned perhaps 45-50 different lenses over that period of time and using cameras all-day, every-day for decades.

    Use the gear with care, use a lens hood whenever possible (to reduce stray light and minimize loss of contrast), use lens caps whenever not using a lens, and you are not likely to suffer any lens damage.

    If I had purchased expensive premium skylight filters for every lens I've owned those filters would have cost me far more than repairing the front element of that one lens that got dinged. In addition, surprisingly, a small amount of minor damage to the front element of a lens is not likely to result in any noticeable difference in your images.

    Early on in my career I did use UV or skylight filters to protect the front lens elements, but soon gave up that practice and expense and have not regretted giving them up. On the other hand, if you are quite prone to do damage to things that you work with, perhaps using a UV or skylight filter on lenses that will take them may be of some benefit to you. At the risk of possible, slight, image degradation and increased likelihood of flare.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2016
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  5. MAubrey

    MAubrey Photographer

    Jul 9, 2012
    Bellingham, WA
    Mike Aubrey
    Photozone has tests for both and DxO has a test for the Panasonic and Lenstip has a test for the Olympus. Unfortunately, for Photozone, the Panasonic is tested on a 12MP sensor, while the Olympus is tested on a 16MP sensor, so resolution differences aren't comparable. With that said, there are other characteristics that are going to stay (relatively) consistent across sensors:
    • The Olympus is faster, of course.
    • The Panasonic is smaller.
    • The Olympus is the better lens when it comes to vignetting at all focal lengths.
    • The Olympus is the better lens when it comes to CA correction.
    • The Panasonic is the better lens when it comes to distortion (in fact, at 10mm and 12mm, the Panasonic is basically perfectly flat--even uncorrected!)
    • The Panasonic is the better lens when it comes to field curvature.
    They're both quite superb lenses, however, you just need to decide which compromises you're willing to make.
     
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  6. woollyback

    woollyback Mu-43 Veteran

    203
    Oct 20, 2015
    Rob
    I am leaning towards the Panasonic - as the main reason for 4/3 was to remove bulk from Canon ff gear
     
  7. ahinesdesign

    ahinesdesign Mu-43 Veteran

    432
    Dec 6, 2011
    NC, USA
    Aaron
    The Olympus is a stellar lens, but the Panasonic is very close. As outlined above, each lens has strengths and weaknesses. The Oly is relatively huge, larger than the 12-40; the Panasonic quite compact. The Oly costs about 50% more than the Panasonic. The Oly is "splash proof."

    I chose the Olympus. I rarely shoot it at anything other than f/2.8 (even outside, unless its just too bright) I do a fair amount of indoor low-light work where the extra aperture helps. You can even get some background separation, but you gotta get REALLY close to the subject. The manual focus clutch is great for video. But I find that I leave the 7-14 at home more than I probably would if it were smaller and lighter weight... Its one of my favorite lenses for m4/3!
     
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  8. wjiang

    wjiang Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Just beware the occasional purple blob flare issue that can rear its ugly head at times with the Panasonic 7-14 on Olympus bodies...
     
  9. StefanKruse

    StefanKruse Mu-43 Veteran

    349
    Jan 28, 2015
    Denmark
    Stefan
    When I bought the 12-40 the dealer tried to push the 7-14mm on me. I was in a physical shop in the first because I was slightly worried whether the 12-40mm was to big to handle on my E-M10, for the size of the 12-40 is not an issue I do and I find no problems shooting it onehanded without a grip, however the 7-14mm was a different story the thing is huge and heavy compared to the 12-40mm. Now everyone is different and you might not have an issue but just be aware that the Oly is large even compared to 12-40mm. The 12-40 weighs 382gr compared to the 7-14 which is 40% heavier at 534gr that to me makes a difference. (the Panasonic is 300gr I believe).

    BTW the quality and feel of the oly was great as with the 12-40 could not comment on IQ but I believe there are plenty of reviews and samples on the forum.
     
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  10. laser8

    laser8 Mu-43 Veteran

    403
    Jan 29, 2013
    Mare nostrum, Istria
    From what I read both are stellar. I have the 7-14 2.8, primarily for the weather sealing, as I use it in the fields mostly, and the 2.8 for evening and night shots. If you don't shoot in low light without a tripod, and in "normal" environments, I'd go for the cheaper, smaller, lighter Panasonic.
     
  11. robcee

    robcee Mu-43 Veteran

    289
    Jan 10, 2016
    Toronto
    Rob Campbell
    great lenses. I own the panasonic and love it.

    One point I didn't see mentioned here was that the Olympus can focus quite close, giving a close-up view at 7mm can be pretty fantastic. Combined with f2.8 and you can get some pretty interesting bokeh out of it. Another thing is if you're at all interested in astrophotography, the extra stop can be a big difference.

    some requisite sample images:

    22286391549_6220fdfd78_b.
    stone in brick


    22285235210_410122d8c2_b.
    beach head
     
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  12. Glenn S

    Glenn S Mu-43 Top Veteran

    788
    Feb 1, 2010
    Panny 7-14 at 7mm. Purple blob was evident but with a bit of cloning I managed to remove most of it. This was a quick demo of a pretty extreme case of the purple blob.

    [​IMG]
     
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  13. NCV

    NCV Mu-43 Regular

    69
    Mar 9, 2016
    Italy
    Nigel
    I was going to get the Panasonic version as it is more compact, but was put off by reports and evidence of purple blobs appearing in some circumstances. Do a Google search to find out some more.

    I bought the Olympus version for my EM5 in the end.

    These super wide lenses are very susceptible to flare coming from side lighting and such.
     
  14. bikerhiker

    bikerhiker Mu-43 All-Pro

    Dec 24, 2013
    Canada
    David
    Pros for Olympus 7-14
    1, Weather sealed -dust, freeze proof and water resistant (You can't have an E-M1 being weather proof without a weather proof lens) The 12-40 is weather proof.
    2, While f/2.8 is not a worry, that is a stop of dynamic range and noise performance you gain especially when shooting landscape in overcast and low light. Faster shutter speed with IBIS ensure that even in windy days, your images will also be sharp because your shutter speed is 1 stop faster.
    3, Just like the 12-40, I believe the 7-14 also have an option button you can assign.

    Otherwise, the weight and size is bigger and heavier than the Panny 7-14 and the Panny 7-14 is not weatherproof which means, your E-M1 will not be weatherproof if your lens attached is not. You need both lens and body to be weatherproof. If weatherproofing is important to you, then the Olympus is a no-brainer.

    I'm actually saving up for the Oly just because I have an adapted 10mm f/2 lens (Samyang 14 + focal reducer) and at first I though f/2 is not a big deal. Then I realize that in overcast days, f/2 is a godsend. I'm able to use much much lower ISO than f/4 (2 stops) more and hence am able to gain 2 stops more dynamic range. I live in the west coast so there are more overcast days in the winter than in drier places..
     
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  15. StefanKruse

    StefanKruse Mu-43 Veteran

    349
    Jan 28, 2015
    Denmark
    Stefan
  16. Joe Smith

    Joe Smith Mu-43 Regular

    126
    Mar 6, 2016
    If you use the Panasonic 7-14 on an Olympus body, you definitely will want to add an UV filter. You can't put a filter in front of the lens, but the rear filter holder from the Panasonic 8mm f/3.5 fits perfectly on the 7-14 and is the "standard" solution to that well known "purple blob problem". You'll find how-to articles all over the internet.
     
  17. DoofClenas

    DoofClenas Who needs a Mirror!

    943
    Nov 9, 2012
    Traverse City, MI
    Clint
    I owned the 7-14 f4 zd Olympus...loved it...but sold it the day the 2.8 version was announced. I'll eventually buy the Olympus m4/3 version...but in the meantime, Ill make due with the cheap Rokinon 7.5mm and just defish the lens when appropriate. It's a tiny lens and it performs way better than I thought it would. For $180 (bought used in mint condition) it may be one of the best value/performing lenses in the m4/3 family.
     
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  18. ashburtononline

    ashburtononline Mu-43 Veteran

    394
    Jan 21, 2015
    New Zealand
    Consider the ZD 7-14 f4 too ..... Its BIG but it too is an excellent performer (bit prone to flare in bright light) but can match the others. I got mine 'mint' with mm3 adaptor for under $1k. focus is fine too on the EM1.

     
  19. pdk42

    pdk42 One of the "Eh?" team

    Jan 11, 2013
    Leamington Spa, UK
    I have the Panasonic 7-14 and in almost all respects it's an excellent lens. However, the purple blob issue can be a real PITA in some scenes. The Oly doesn't suffer from this at all. If I were buying again (and had the cash!), I'd go for the Oly, but it is quite a bit heavier and larger.
     
  20. ahinesdesign

    ahinesdesign Mu-43 Veteran

    432
    Dec 6, 2011
    NC, USA
    Aaron
    I have seen the Oly 7-14 + EM5 produce the purple flare with a strong light source off axis. Not as bad as the Panasonic - the flare is much smaller, sometimes more blue in color - but the Oly isn't immune. Other Oly bodies seem to minimize flare from the Oly 7-14, especially the EM1, so it may be something with the EM5 sensor cover? Its not a deal breaker, and nearly all ultra wide lenses show some amount of flare under the right circumstances.

    The Rokinon fisheye is the only ultrawide for the m4/3 system that seems to be virtually free of the flare we see in other ultrawide lenses...