Why I Love µ4/3 for Wildlife Photography

Discussion in 'Nature' started by Phocal, Mar 17, 2015.

  1. Phocal

    Phocal Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jan 3, 2014
    l
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2017
    • Like Like x 9
    • Agree Agree x 6
  2. kinlau

    kinlau Mu-43 Top Veteran

    841
    Feb 29, 2012
    Apply your same logic, but now substitute the Panasonic FZ-1000 instead. I still have my GH3 + 100-300, but the FZ-1000 is actually faster shooting with better AF. I carry that along side my 7D + 400mm.
     
  3. pellicle

    pellicle Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 10, 2010
    Southport, OzTrailEYa
    pellicle
    100% with you there. Back in Feb 2009 when I went to m43 I'm not sure if I knew about adapted lenses (the cameras were still only in discussions on sites then), but soon after I got my first adapter (an FD one) some time in about May 2009 and quickly wacked on a FD300f4 ... there was totally nothing like the cost effectiveness of that rig at that time. To my mind there still isn't.

    For someone on a budget (read unwilling to throw thousands onto a hobby) I was suddenly able to access image quality which was top shelf professional not long before.

    3616394070_47a590f3dd.

    and when discussing "DoF Advantage" its still not real wide on a 300mm lens at f4 either:

    4321761336_336988ce8b_z.

    When its -20 these little guys don't sit still much. So the m43 really works in your favor
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2015
    • Like Like x 6
    • Agree Agree x 1
  4. pellicle

    pellicle Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 10, 2010
    Southport, OzTrailEYa
    pellicle
    small point

    that's Canon EOS ... still nothing I know of to control mechanical aperture lenses.... such as oft talked about Canon FD
     
  5. faithblinded

    faithblinded Mu-43 Top Veteran

    947
    Nov 25, 2014
    Cleveland, OH
    Ken
    FD lenses have a mechanical aperture ring. There is no need for the body to control aperture.
     
  6. pellicle

    pellicle Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 10, 2010
    Southport, OzTrailEYa
    pellicle
    If you read my post it should have been clear that I know this. Having been around these sort of forums and been a moderator on an adapted lens forum on flickr back then too I can assure you that tons of newbies have zero idea on how anything even works. I have given up making assumptions on what constitutes a stupid question as the levels of knowledge on how stuff works are so low as to cause divide by zero errors.

    I can't count how many times people have assumed that the camera can magically control aperture. As to no need ... well on the mechanical bodies it was controlled, it would be nice if you ask me if there was some electronic stepper motor control. If you understand how these lenses work (once called auto lenses) you would realise that even on mechanical bodies we focus with the aperture fully open and it is stopped down (automatically) at shutter release by a simple moving lever . Something like that for instance would be appealing.
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2015
  7. faithblinded

    faithblinded Mu-43 Top Veteran

    947
    Nov 25, 2014
    Cleveland, OH
    Ken
    I wasn't giving you attitude, just trying to make sense of your post. I'm well aware of how wide open focusing works. Many FD to m43 adapters have a control ring built into them to switch between stopped down and wide open. Others skip the option and simply engage the aperture blades all the time with a non-moving pin.

    As to a built in stepper motor to control aperture on legacy glass... Sorry but total pipe dream. Reminds me of NASA spending millions to design a pen that writes in space, while russia simply took pencils.
     
  8. Phocal

    Phocal Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jan 3, 2014
    l
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2017
  9. pellicle

    pellicle Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 10, 2010
    Southport, OzTrailEYa
    pellicle
    Hi

    sort of, assuming one wishes to stop down to f8 (not often for me) its nice to focus at f4 for focal plane accuracy and then snap knowing that the stop down will happen in a blink

    aside from that point I agree its like an appendix
     
  10. pellicle

    pellicle Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 10, 2010
    Southport, OzTrailEYa
    pellicle
    sorry about that ... hard to know sometimes.

    apology if my return was a bit more vinegar than it needed to be.

    sometimes its nice to dream ... but it was not raised as a serious desire, just an example.

    I've seen many many times people confuse mounts here ... thinking Canon is Canon is Canon ... like it is for Pentax or Nikon ... few (aside from those with experience) know that there is even FD and EOS mounts in Canon.
     
  11. faithblinded

    faithblinded Mu-43 Top Veteran

    947
    Nov 25, 2014
    Cleveland, OH
    Ken
    No worries. I only know FD since I have a few lenses, but many of the legacy manual lenses operate similarly. There are so many other common, oddball, and esoteric mounts I know nothing about though, so I get what you're saying.
     
  12. Fri13

    Fri13 Mu-43 Veteran

    358
    Jan 30, 2014
    Until you hear Americans say that in space a flying nice lead dust isn't so nice to electronics... Until you again remember that same lead is used to solder electronics and a such lead dust isn't a problem for soviets used tech as they preferred to use vacuum tubes very much (invulnerable to many electronical problems and protected against EMP, a problem in space).
     
  13. Listener

    Listener Mu-43 Regular

    Pencil "lead" is carbon, not lead.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  14. barry13

    barry13 Super Moderator; Photon Wrangler Subscribing Member

    Mar 7, 2014
    Southern California
    Barry
    • Agree Agree x 1
  15. Petrochemist

    Petrochemist Mu-43 Top Veteran

    788
    Mar 21, 2013
    N Essex, UK
    Mike
    Yes but graphite (the form of carbon used in pencils) is conductive & can short out electronics.
    Wax crayons may have been a better solution.:)

    Having just followed Barry's link I see that's no good as it's flammable.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2015
  16. Lcrunyon

    Lcrunyon Mu-43 All-Pro Subscribing Member

    Jun 4, 2014
    Maryland
    Loren
    My thoughts on M4/3 as a wildlife kit mirrors the OP's. That they are weather sealed and great optically doesn't hurt either. I've been using an EM-1 and grip, the native Pro and macro lenses, the teleconverter and Kenko extension tubes, Lee filters and a RRS tripod. I can do everything I want with it - wildlife, landscape and crazy macro.

    I did buy a 7D Mk II and 100-400mm L f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM and 1.4 teleconverter for the better AF, and while it is a superb kit for a very limited function, it's nowhere near as fun or versatile, not to mention just as heavy as the entire m4/3 kit (not including the tripod). Granted, it ends up having twice the reach, but my m4/3 kit will catch up with the 300mm Pro.:bowdown:
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  17. Phocal

    Phocal Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jan 3, 2014
    l
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2017
  18. faithblinded

    faithblinded Mu-43 Top Veteran

    947
    Nov 25, 2014
    Cleveland, OH
    Ken
    I agree so much, I went all in with a 4/3 ZD300 f2.8. It just arrived today, and it's glorious. My precious... Add the EC-14 and EC-20, and my kit is crazy versatile.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  19. denniscloutier

    denniscloutier Mu-43 Veteran Subscribing Member

    240
    Dec 24, 2011
    Vancouver, BC
    Me too. I've had mine for a few days. It does a great job, but oh boy, 300mm at f2.8 has its challenges. I have a close up photo of a red wing blackbird where the only thing in focus is the base of his beak. I have now figured out that for small animals you need to stop down or you'll end up with a depth of field of about 1/8".:eek-31:
     
    • Funny Funny x 2
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  20. Lcrunyon

    Lcrunyon Mu-43 All-Pro Subscribing Member

    Jun 4, 2014
    Maryland
    Loren
    Yes. I too have high hopes that the EM-1 Mk II. I really do think Olympus has its sights on being a strong wildlife photography contender, with the EE-1 and the work they have been doing on C-AF. If the 40-150 is any indication, the 300mm Pro ought to also help a lot. When that happens, I'll probably not even want the Canon anymore. I just use it for BIF, and haven't gelled with it like I have Olympus.

    A while back I rented the 300mm f/2.8, and it was indeed an amazing lens. It was never really in my budget, though, and in any case the importance of having a hand-holdable kit made it a bad option for me. I'd be interested to hear how the C-AF is with it after the firmware 3.0 upgrade.