Why firms are focusing on Video in my opinion

D7k1

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Pretend you are a counselor to a senior in high school or someone in college who wants to make a choice of what to study. Let’s say this person is interested in some kind of art degree but wants to make a reasonable living with hopes to do creative stuff on the side – perhaps with a goal of doing that full time.

Would you recommend that person become a stills photographer or a videographer?

Where are the opportunities?

Which job market is alive and growing?

What is the most cost effective way to obtain the tools needed to develop the required sills?

I think camera manufacturers have already seen this opportunity and have positioned products to fulfill the needs of the current markets. Still photographers are IMHO lucky that stills still have value in the current media.

I think this is why we are seeing such a focus on video. The cost of cameras like the Gx85 and the kit lenses mean that almost any person with a modest income can get tools to create/learn with and those at community or state colleges are without avenues to learn the profession. Voids in markets don’t stay open long and IMHO that is why the market is now hybrid cameras.

I also believe that the market needs both camcorders and hybrids to service all content creators needs.
 

LilSebastian

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Follow the money. Every "content creator" that can draw eyeballs to a 12 minute video that could have been eloquently written in a blog with 350 words has the opportunity to cram 3+ advertisements in or get a key sponsor (e.g. Squarespace). Bandwidth continues to grow world wide, devices to transmit the show are in every hand. The trend is your friend, and in camera business where stills reached a "good enough" plateau for most consumers long ago, emphasizing video makes total sense.
 
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TikTok
YouTube
Vimeo

Their young user base vastly prefers video both producing and consuming. The market for stills photos has almost evaporated with the disappearance of print magazines, coffee table books, anthologies, etc. The move by all digital media from time discrete to persistent and legacy in demand elevated video over all other formats.
 

Juggernaut

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absolutely video making is the right pathfoward in my opinion. technically it is also much more complicated than photography, in terms of production and post-production. many people are presently living upon video-making and broadcasting, and the professional skill-set makes distinctive differences.
 

exakta

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Video has always been a bigger market. Remember VHS tapes? The blank tapes were actually cheaper than audio cassettes because they sold in much higher numbers. You'd see them for sale at supermarket checkouts, for pete's sake. Just the cost of the raw materials had to be 4 times that of audio cassettes.

Back in the silent 8mm "home movie" days, you'd be able to shoot less than 5 minutes of action before changing the film. Camcorders changed everything, even when they were huge things you slung over your shoulder. You could shoot for hours on one tape with audio! The camcorders and tapes got smaller and things were going pretty good until the iPhone changed the rules again, making instant sharing possible.

Being able to go beyond phone videos is a much more lucrative market than going beyond phone stills.
 

Little Fish

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First, "Video killed the radio star" It happened just about that time too (1980s). In the 1990s people were still shooting stills with 35mm film SLRs not much changed other than the AF lens and auto exposure. Consumer Camcorders started appearing late 1990s shooting digital film tape. Not much changed in photo land but video sales and the availability of consumer video players were flooding the markets as was the CD player. It wasn't until 2001 that I started into Digital Photo. And by 2003 I was shooting 720p Camcorder. Digital Video quality was pretty low back in the early days (80s, 90s, 2000 to 2010) and most consumers shot video for personal use. By 2006 high quality consumer video cameras were available in camcorder or DSLR or MFT. Also, YOUTUBE was becoming the new land for video posters about that time. DSLRs became the norm for photo, and 720p video for most consumer cameras. And, by 2010 DSLR photo cameras had 1080p FHD available, and the phone camera became the EDC video/photo tool for the masses. By 2015, 4K video was available in consumer Mirrorless cameras and phones.

Thus, Video has been the dominating market force for the past 30 years over photography for pro video and consumer video. Most of the innovations for digital photo come from digital video. And video is a huge part of a modern mirrorless camera. Some by MFT cameras just for the video abilities.

Too bad, more people don't make use of their camera's high quality video ability. Especially in the world of MFT where our mirrorless cameras are some of the most popular and best hand held stabilized 4K video cameras on the market.

The reality is: Shooting video is NOT THAT HARD TO LEARN, and can be shot in AUTO mode.
 

DanS

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Not to mention many of the advancements that go towards video also make a camera a better stills camera.
 

retiredfromlife

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From what I hear from camera shops where I can talk to staff, the majority of camera sales are to the enthusiast hobby people not pro's and most of them are mainly interested in still.
I am only in one camera club and visit another and they are all about stills.

The only people I know who take videos are family people taking baby videos and the younger generation like my daughter and they mainly use phones.

I am not saying camera manufacturers are going in the wrong direction, but I would like to know how many of the sold cameras are really being used for videos.
Only interested because if they do not introduce new stills features who would upgrade if you do not do video?
But if better video equals better stills as well I suppose all ok ?
 

fortwodriver

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Because it's fun. It's that simple. AFHV showed everyone over 10 years of syndicated reruns how much fun it was to record yourself making a fool of yourself. Even better, capture others making fools of themselves. Laughter is still the best medicine and gags still rule.

You can also get away with much more deleterious compression of a video than you can with stills if it means you can share if faster.

But in the by the 90s only enthusiasts were using SLRs still. Most of the world had moved on to point and shoots. Even so, the video and photo magazines argued for about 2 decades that it LOOKED like video would wipe out still photography. There were whole families that owned a video camera but no film camera.

Digital cameras turned that around - mainly because you didn't have to take your film to be developed anymore - much the same as how video became WAY more popular than 8mm film, because it didn't need to be developed - no waiting! I'm surprised it took so long to go from digital photography to the Canon 5D and the Nikon D70 and their video capabilities.

I remember when we (at work) got a Casio QV-10 - the first consumer digicam. I think it cost us about $900 at the time. Everyone kept asking if it did video, and were always disappointed when they discovered it did not.
 
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DanS

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I am not saying camera manufacturers are going in the wrong direction, but I would like to know how many of the sold cameras are really being used for videos.
Only interested because if they do not introduce new stills features who would upgrade if you do not do video?

exact numbers will be hard to comeby , but I can tell you a lot of people who make youtube videos use panasonic cameras.


for example this is one of the several youtubers I follow that use a Panasonic (GH5s in this case)!


and another supper popular Youtuber!
 
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Little Fish

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Most if not all online camera sites have forums. And most of the posters are mostly photographers. I noticed this in 2015 when I visited different forums online. Seems on MU43 and DPreview, Olympus dominates the MFT forums as Oly has more photo categories and more regular frequent posters than does Panny. Thus, more posts on Olympus topics for various MFT questions, info, rumors etc... Also, Olympus OMDs were the most popular choice for best MFT photocentric cameras. Opposingly, Lumix found great succeed in the mirrorless HD and 4K market with the GH series. And searching specific Oly cameras and lenses, seems Oly dominates the MFT forums by the numbers. And there's nothing wrong with that. After all, this is a camera based website. Just my observation.

I foresee the "EVOLUTION" of the FF mirrorless trend will continue to incorporate high-end video features in their mirrorless. And MFT will continue to find success in video innovations as they have with Hybrid photo/video cameras and lenses. Because video is the main MARKETING tool for the digital age, I suspect Sony and Canon to create new innovations to improve the video function and processing of their FF. And as time goes on, Video (Because of it's marketing aspect) will continue to be the driving force of technology innovation with demands for: higher capacity and faster memory, Faster processors, more efficient software for editing/printing/rendering, improved video monitoring devices, Faster internet bandwidth technology, improvements in wireless type communications, ETC... Yes, Cameras and Video is what drives almost all technology innovations. The demand for video speed, bandwidth, and uploading media communication tech is all driven by the demands for higher quality video, easier to shoot video, easier to process video, and easier to network video.
And the trend will continue.


The following are some of my speculations for the future of MFT's photo/video ability.
What I do know (and have seen in the past 3-4 years) is, MFT cameras have been going through a marketing change. Oly has been improving their 4K video features on their top cameras. For photo, Oly was already leading the mirrorless industry with photo features like stabilization, high burst modes, fast buffering, industry leading weather sealing, image quality, and a plethora of in-camera photo features like live composite. To top that, Oly created a beast of a pro flagship the EMX-1, (which is currently on sale for $1800) a bargain of a deal even for the G9 shooter who is into wildlife. Moreover, Oly introduced the 100-400mm super-tele cheaper than the 100-400 ELMAR. And recently Oly has created the king of all MFT super-tele, The 150-400 f4 with build in TC and switches. Yes I know it's huge, expensive, and esoteric.

Likewise, in those 3 to 4 years Lumix took their decades of mirrorless manufacturing knowledge and created 3 FF Hybrid cameras S1, S1r, and S5 (specs wise) the industry leader in mirrorless FF market. Lumix also introduced a photocentric G9 and 2 super-tele 50-200 and 200mm ELMARIT. In addition Lumix continued to focus on video introducing the GH5S a dedicated cine camera. Lumix also introduced a box camera BGH for cinematic video, a high res recording go-pro with a price of $2000 (we may see the BGH shooting high speed action like NASCAR someday). But wait... there's more... Lumix also introduced the S1H another videocentric cine camera in FF.

So as you can see, MFT has been producing a lot of gear for the past 3-4 years. With the recent Lumix Rumors confirmed, it's for sure the GH5II, and GH6 will be selling within a year. Thus, it's an exciting time we live in. And it's great that Olympus and Panasonic continue to listen to their consumers and incorporate the new innovations we seek to take us to the next level of photo/video.
 
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It seems like a conundrum for those who make a living as photographers nowadays your video skills have to be on par with your photography just to showcase yourself. The photographers I follow on the tube all seem to have great video production as well.
 

fortwodriver

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It seems like a conundrum for those who make a living as photographers nowadays your video skills have to be on par with your photography just to showcase yourself. The photographers I follow on the tube all seem to have great video production as well.
Well, the process is similar... You have to be good at lighting. Most pros I speak to now have added video to their abilities.

I sometimes feel, based on the examples I see out there, that gear-head-photographers who are not very good at lighting are often ones that argue that video shouldn't be part of their domain. They fail to realize that walking around with your aperture at f1.0 to f1.4 and blowing out the focus of your background doesn't really work when you're actually trying to tell a story...
 

Armoured

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Porn demand drives (pulls?) the technology, and there's not much new in stills porn, really.

That's okay, we get what's left over - gear porn for pixelbators.
 
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