Who's lusting after weathersealed primes?

Discussion in 'Native Lenses' started by yottavirus, Mar 12, 2012.

  1. yottavirus

    yottavirus Mu-43 Regular

    115
    Aug 13, 2011
    With the em-5 on the horizon and rumours of the panasonic gh3 being 'high end' *cough*, the state of higher end lenses, especially primes, should be looked at. Since m43 primes tend to be small and have no moving parts, it looks easy to seal them. It would also be nice if they would improve other features while they're at it, such as making the 45/1.8 in black, so that it doesn't look hideous on the em-5, and making the 20/1.7 internal focusing while increasing the focus speed.


    I haven't seen anyone wish for these things, but I'm sure there are many out there.
     
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  2. bongestrella

    bongestrella Mu-43 Veteran

    404
    Sep 2, 2011
    Mechanicsburg, PA
    For most of us, weathersealing is not really important, but if it's there then why not? Especially if it's not really going anything much to the price (highly doubtful).
     
  3. Luke

    Luke Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jul 30, 2010
    Milwaukee, WI
    Luke
    more weather sealed lenses please.....I LOVE walking in the rain and taking photos....same for the snow!
     
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  4. heedpantsnow

    heedpantsnow Mu-43 Veteran

    332
    Jul 24, 2011
    Me, too! Me, too! I've been out in the field so many times, trying to keep my old 10D dry, missing shots. I HATE that Canon doesn't do any weatherproofing in their mid-range cameras.
     
  5. bongestrella

    bongestrella Mu-43 Veteran

    404
    Sep 2, 2011
    Mechanicsburg, PA
    Not sure about the 10d, but my 60d (and 50d and 40d before that) are weathersealed. Maybe not up to the standards of the 1d or even 7d but it's there, good enough to not worry about it not being dry. I believe the em-5 (and maybe the future GH model) is -sealed, not -proofed.
     
  6. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    From my experience, the non weather-sealed Olympus E-510 is more robust in wet weather than the Canons you mentioned (except the 1D and 7D). The actual weather sealed Olympus bodies (E-1, E-3, and E-5) are untouchable except by Pentax' sealed system. Just because they don't claim weather sealing doesn't mean a camera isn't good in inclement weather, and vice versa - not every claim of weather sealing is effective.

    More importantly though, Olympus has the best selection of fully weather sealed lenses, as every High Grade and Super High Grade Zuiko lens and all Olympus teleconverters are sealed. You can't have a sealed system without the glass. Pentax only has a handful of sealed lenses. Canon has a good selection, by virtue of simply having more lenses, but they're not as well sealed as Olympus and Pentax. So as a system Olympus remains the leader in weather sealing, but the others still give you the option.

    Weather-Sealed or Weather-Proof are the terms used, not Waterproof. The difference between the Weather-Proof and Water-Proof is the ability to be submerged. A waterproof camera can be left UNDER water and even the constant water pressure won't leak through the seals. The Olympus system however, can be submerged for short periods, for instance if you dunk the camera or drop it in the drink and pull it back out again. It can take about any degree of non-submerged water you throw at it, whether being in a torrential downpour all day or hosing off salt water in the shower. As long as it's not under pressure, it can stay in the water as long as you need.

    This is how the system has been through the E-1, E-3, and E-5, and the E-M5 is supposed to have the same level of weather sealing as the E-5. After you've experienced true weather-proofing, you don't tend to take any others seriously. I admit that is snobbish though, as even light sealing can be very useful and really all that most people need. Just how many photos do we actually take out in the pouring rain? A dry bag is probably more important than a sealed camera to most of us...

    yeg09-08-10_3_web.

    I'm used to weather sealed DSLRs from the Olympus pro-grade system, but since switching to the PEN system I have had to forgo that advantage for many years now. Instead, I just keep my PEN camera within a ziplock bag inside the camera bag (since the camera is small enough to do that, lol). That works fine for me... I don't have to worry about the camera getting wet when I'm caught out in the rain, as long as I don't take it out to shoot.
     
  7. steve16823

    steve16823 Mu-43 Regular

    181
    Sep 26, 2011
    Brookfield, IL
    According to Olympus, the EM-5 is "dust-proof and splash-proof" and having owned several "dust-proof and spash-proof" Olympus cameras over the years, I can tell you they really mean it.
     
  8. bongestrella

    bongestrella Mu-43 Veteran

    404
    Sep 2, 2011
    Mechanicsburg, PA
    According to Robin Wong's review, the em-5's EVF fogged up though, after using it under the rain. I don't doubt what olympus' and/or pentax's claims since I never really needed one so it's really of no importance to me, but surely when you say "they mean it" this should not happen, no? Although I don't remember if Robin was using a the 12-50 lens when he was using it.

    Back to the topic, do you guys think weathersealing add much to the overall price of the camera/lens?
     
  9. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    The E-M5 is the first weather sealed camera to use an EVF. Unexpected problems should be expected...

    Traditionally, Olympus has never raised the price of a camera due to weather sealing. Weather sealing is simply a granted feature to higher-end items. Sure, the E-5 is a lot more expensive than the E-620, but the weather sealing is not the reason for it. You can tell that if you compare the cost of the E-30 and the E-3. They are both on the same level, yet the E-30 is not sealed.

    This is also true of the lenses... Every high and super-high grade Zuiko lens comes with weather sealing as a bonus. What you're paying for is the build and optical performance of the lens.

    The original Zuiko 14-54mm f/2.8-3.5 was only $500, the same price as the slower and softer m.Zuiko 12-50mm f/3.5-5.6, but the newer Mark II version of the same 14-54mm lens retailed at $750. These are all weather sealed lenses, but the difference in price is due to the change in market. Unfortunately, you can't find a wonderful fast zoom like the original Zuiko 14-54mm anymore for only $500, and that is why they raised the price on the second version.

    So basically, the reason we're paying more for weather sealed stuff is simply because they're only putting weather sealing into higher-ticket items which would be more expensive with or without the weathersealing.
     
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  10. GaryAyala

    GaryAyala Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 2, 2011
    SoCal
    +1, I have many weather-sealed 'L' lenses and I still treat them the same as if the were not weather-sealed. I toss a plastic bag around them and shoot away. With the invention of plastic bags, I've been shooting for decades in nasty weather.

    I wish all my lenses and cameras had weather sealing and IS. But such niceties, or lack thereof, are not deal breakers for purchasing. Similarly, the lack of these "luxuries" will not limit my shooting behavior.

    G
     
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  11. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    I used to get those plastic rain sleeves they sell for $6/pair. They have a nice drawstring closure to tighten it around your lens hood, and a hole for the viewfinder that you put your eyecup over (remove the eyecup then replace it on the outside of the bag to hold everything in place). Works pretty decent, but easy to make yourself as well (at $3/each retail though, why bother with home-made?). These would be ideal for those using a splash-proof lens but a non-sealed body, like those of us moving from the Four-Thirds to PEN system... but the bag is too big and ungainly for a PEN, lol.
     
  12. GaryAyala

    GaryAyala Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 2, 2011
    SoCal
  13. ggibson

    ggibson Mu-43 Regular

    72
    Jul 9, 2011
    Seems to me the biggest challenge of shooting in extreme weather is keeping the lens dry. I've had my GF1 out in light rain, taken it rafting, skiing... no big deal getting a little water on the body. I don't deny that the E-M5 would make these situations less worrisome. But weather proofing doesn't keep water off the front element, which is what will ruin your shot.
     
  14. yottavirus

    yottavirus Mu-43 Regular

    115
    Aug 13, 2011
    That's where deep hoods and environmental awareness come in.

    I LOVE shooting in bad/extreme weather, it's as if photography were combined with a game where you have to get the best shots off without letting your equipment get touched.
     
  15. dhazeghi

    dhazeghi Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 6, 2010
    San Jose, CA
    Dara
    Sealing is only as good as the weakest link. As insurance, it can't hurt. But in terms of getting photos in the rain or mist or snow, the bigger problem is keeping the LCD and front-element of the lens free of condensation and moisture. Sealing isn't especially helpful there.

    I'd rather they simply concentrated on the lens lineup, especially the zoom lenses.

    DH
     
  16. GaryAyala

    GaryAyala Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 2, 2011
    SoCal
    LOL ... Yes! ... the same goes for life as well.

    Gary
     
  17. drcolby

    drcolby Mu-43 Regular

    30
    Jul 4, 2012
    After a day of slogging around the great Pacific Northwest trying to take pictures using an OMD and a weather sealed 12-50 lens, I am wondering if there is a list somewhere of weather sealed native Pandy and Oly lenses?
    Earlier in the fall we made an 8-day raft trip down the Grand Canyon. I had a PEN with the 12-50, I put that away after the second set of rapids and used a waterproof Lumix the rest of the way down.
    Dave
     
  18. GaryAyala

    GaryAyala Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 2, 2011
    SoCal
    I think weather sealed lenses so far are:

    O12-50
    O60mm
    P12-35
    P35-100
     
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  19. flash

    flash Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Apr 29, 2010
    1 hour from Sydney Australia.
    Gordon
    Last weekend I was shooting a wedding on a very wet day. I'm not one to have much care about weather sealing. I've taken all sorts of cameras in all sorts of conditions. I once shot the world jetski championships standing chest deep in salt water with a EOS5 and 35-350L on a mono pod, lifting it as the wash from the jetskis passed.

    So I'm standing mostly under a small ******* last Friday, in the rain, with an E-M5 and 12-35 on one shoulder and a Leica M9 on the other. At that moment a woman decides to push the canvas up with an umbrella, emptying the rain on the roof of the ******* on to the camera hanging from my right shoulder. Probably 3 or 4 litres of water poured down on the camera and lens. Luckily the Leica was on my left.

    A quick wipe and the E-M5 is fine. I have suddenly grown a new appreciation for weather sealing.

    So I'm all for weather sealed lenses. Still going to use my Leica in the rain though.

    Gordon

    for some reason the forum thinks that M A R Q U E E is a bad word. Thats what the asterix' are.
     
  20. ccunningham

    ccunningham Mu-43 Veteran

    453
    Jul 23, 2010
    While I like shooting in rainy or snowy weather, sometimes it's just nice not to have to worry about the weather if you want to go out for a photowalk, and in the past I had depended on my D300 for that. It's taken an unexpected soaking more than once when I've been caught out away from shelter, really dripping wet soaking, and it's never had any problems. And while I still have it and like it, it's bigger and heavier than my e-m5(why do I still have it then you say? I have a bunch of Nikon CLS + lenses, expecially macro that I haven't been able to replace, and for some things it's speed is nice. And I still like my Nikon gear for some things, but carrying it around isn't one of those things.)

    For me a reasonably priced weather sealed prime would be nice. I like the 12-50 kit zoom, but it's a little slow in the aperture area. I like the idea of the fast high-end panasonic zooms, but I can't manage the price. So an affordable, weatherproof prime in the 17-25 mm range with f2-ish aperture would be a nice complement to the e-m5 I would think. In fact, like some other people have pointed out, I don't understand why the new 17 f1.8 isn't weathersealed (and available in black for that matter,) since Olympus already had the e-m5 out for awhile.