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Which lens filter for my new oly 25mm f1.8?

Discussion in 'Native Lenses' started by desmoface, Dec 29, 2014.

  1. desmoface

    desmoface Mu-43 Regular

    171
    Jan 16, 2012
    Hello everyone, what would be a decent filter to get to protect my new oly 25 ? Thanks in advance.

    Steve
     
  2. usayit

    usayit Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    * If you are not willing to spend money on a good filter, you are better off not using one. (B+W is one that I use. Tiffen and Hoya make higher end ones too but I generally stick to B+W)

    * Olympus 25mm has a 46mm filter thread. You will need filters of that size.


    Cue in the "Use a hood" groupies....
     
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  3. desmoface

    desmoface Mu-43 Regular

    171
    Jan 16, 2012
  4. LowriderS10

    LowriderS10 Monkey with a camera.

    May 19, 2013
    Canada
    Yes, that filter looks good.

    I used to be a huge fan of UV filters when I was shooting for work (newspaper photography), and they were needed to complete the weather sealing on my Canons, plus I never carried lens caps, because the cameras needed to be ready to shoot at all times. However, since I switched to M4/3, I no longer use UV filters. I find they get scratched easier than lens front elements (tiny, tiny scratches that scatter light everywhere), in all my years of shooting a UV filter has never once "protected" any of my lenses from anything, and they can introduce extra flaring, ghosting, etc.

    I'm not telling you what to do, but over the years I've spent hundreds upon hundreds of dollars for good filters (used to only use B&W...those in the 82mm size were hideously expensive when the lenses requiring them first came out), without really seeing any of the benefits. (As for "protection," the filters I bought could have easily paid for a few front element replacements haha).
     
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  5. desmoface

    desmoface Mu-43 Regular

    171
    Jan 16, 2012
    Hiya lowrider, thanks for the advice. I figure for $28 it's cheap insurance, I tend to be a bit clumsy, LOL. Do you think a good filter would help or hinder image quality?

    Steve
     
    • Like Like x 1
  6. LowriderS10

    LowriderS10 Monkey with a camera.

    May 19, 2013
    Canada
    Insurance against what? ;) I'm certainly not telling you what to do or what not to do, but front elements are very hard to damage, plus there are plenty of stories of people dropping lenses and the lens surviving, the filter shattering and damaging the lens. I understand that "emotionally" it feels good to have the UV filter on the front; that's how I used to think, so certainly not judging you or trying to tell you not to buy one. But I no longer bother with them, even though I used to be a HUGE proponent of their use.

    A good filter (such as the B+W you linked) will have no real impact on your IQ, EXCEPT for flaring and ghosting. I used to only have the best of the best UV filters and tested them extensively...as far as sharpness, contrast and colours went, their impact was negligible or nonexistent. However, I did notice more ghosting and flaring with them, especially as they aged and collected a myriad of fine scratches. (This was especially apparent during night photography, something I do quite often). Remember, in the O25, you only have 9 elements in 7 groups...the filter is essentially adding a 10th element and an 8th group...anytime you add elements/groups to a lens, you run the risk of increased unwanted aberrations).

    My current method is to use a lens cap when the lens is not being used and not use filters.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  7. Amin Sabet

    Amin Sabet Administrator

    Apr 10, 2009
    Boston, MA (USA)
    • Like Like x 1
  8. OzRay

    OzRay Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 29, 2010
    South Gippsland, Australia
    Ray, not Oz
    I have a B&W MRC filter on every one of my lenses. One very special feature of these filters is the way they repel water, dirt etc and are easy to clean, which means that the front of the lens is always in respectable working order. I've had all manner of muck on my filters from pushing through scrub and the only way that I've been able to clean off the muck is to wash the filter in river water. I would much rather do this to a filter than the front element of a lens, no matter how durable it's reported to be.

    I've never had ghosting or flare issues because of the B&W filter, but have experienced this with supposedly top-grade filters from other brands. Funnily enough, my 90-250mm filter came with an Olympus OEM filter, which I tried on one assignment and immediately ordered a B&W filter (from memory it cost around $300), because the Olympus filter was like a dirt magnet and impossible to clean in the field. The Olympus filter has been in its case ever since.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  9. LowriderS10

    LowriderS10 Monkey with a camera.

    May 19, 2013
    Canada
    Good points, except I doubt an average O25 user will put his lens through back-country muck, and if he does, I think he'll have bigger issues than front element dirt to worry about. ;)

    The scenario you described is excellent for owners of weather-sealed lenses who shoot in inclement weather...otherwise, I think it has limited benefits.
     
  10. OzRay

    OzRay Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 29, 2010
    South Gippsland, Australia
    Ray, not Oz
    Absolutely, fair-weather photographers will probably never gain much use from a filter, a lens hood should suffice.
     
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  11. LowriderS10

    LowriderS10 Monkey with a camera.

    May 19, 2013
    Canada
    Exactly. I carry a UV filter for my 12-50 (my only weathersealed lens), and put that on in case of inclement weather...other than that, I figure if a lens isn't weathersealed, it likely won't live up to the kind of abuse that (in my mind) would justify the use of a UV filter.
     
  12. edmsnap

    edmsnap Mu-43 Veteran

    430
    Dec 20, 2011
    Edmonton, Alberta
    The newer Hoya EVO UV filters are quite nice and reasonably priced on eBay.
     
  13. desmoface

    desmoface Mu-43 Regular

    171
    Jan 16, 2012
    Hi Amin, thanks for the recommendation. I notice in reading the description that the lens hood may not work with this filter on. Have you an Oly 25mm f1.8 with this filter on it?

    Also, would there be a big difference between this filter and the anti-glare filter that I posted up earlier? http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/11985-REG/B_W_66030559_46mm_UV_Haze_010.html/BI/1848/KBID/2491

    Any comments on this one? It appears to be a bit cheaper http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produ...8994_46mm_Natural_Clear_007.html/prm/alsVwDtl

    Thanks again.

    Steve

     
  14. usayit

    usayit Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Explanation of all the filters form B+W are here:

    https://www.schneideroptics.com/pdfs/filters/WorldOfFilters.pdf

    The main difference is that the XS-pro is thinner for wide angle lenses and has the "MRC-nano" finish

    "The MRC nano coating – all XS-Pro
    Digital fi lters have it. The outer layer of
    MRC nano has been strengthened in its
    effectiveness. The nanotechnology-based
    characteristic (lotus effect) produces a
    better beading effect in water. This makes
    cleaning the fi lter surface even simpler
    and faster"

    All my filters are from before they offered the MRC nano finish... I've been happy. I rarely use lens caps. I rarely carry lens cleaning cloth. I don't concern myself about the front element. I simply wide it clean with what ever is handy (not paper though). I don't baby my lenses. The MRC coating is fairly hard.

    With that said.. not all of my lenses in my mind are "valuable" enough or see enough use to justify the cost.... Its a personal choice. For example, all my Leica lenses are irreplaceable so they have filters.. good filters. When I had the 20mm f/1.7 and the 12-50, neither had a filter. Some lenses (older vintage) have notoriously soft front elements... those absolutely have filters.
     
  15. usayit

    usayit Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    The filter on the 25mm f/1.8 has its on attachment point on the outer portion of the lens. I just took my Leica branded 46mm filter and placed it the front of the 25mm f/1.8 lens and the hood still fits with no issues. This Leica filter is much thicker than the B+W filters so I would surmise that the B+W filters should be ok as well. There is a fair amount of clearance between the hood and filter with both attached.
     
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  16. bigal1000

    bigal1000 Mu-43 Veteran

    337
    Sep 10, 2010
    New Hampshire
    I never saw any good reason to put a $28 filter or any other (maybe a polarizer?) on a $1000 lens use a hood instead, I have never seen any real reason to use filters at all for today's digital cameras, back in the 60's when I got started start in photography, the good old film days ! You really needed to use filters for all sorts of different reasons, but not today.
     
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  17. desmoface

    desmoface Mu-43 Regular

    171
    Jan 16, 2012
    To be honest, the main reason I'm looking at filters is for protection and to just keep the glass pristine and scratch free. Thanks for all the advice.

    Steve
     
  18. desmoface

    desmoface Mu-43 Regular

    171
    Jan 16, 2012
  19. bigal1000

    bigal1000 Mu-43 Veteran

    337
    Sep 10, 2010
    New Hampshire
    Well at least you bought a good one, that's good.
     
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  20. lucifer06

    lucifer06 Mu-43 Rookie

    10
    Nov 18, 2011