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Which camera setup might be best for a wedding reception?

Discussion in 'This or That? (MFT only)' started by wrxspdwgn, Jun 12, 2015.

  1. wrxspdwgn

    wrxspdwgn Mu-43 Regular

    44
    Nov 12, 2012
    Wisconsin
    i've been asked to take photos at my niece's wedding reception this September. The question that I keep asking myself is whether or not I would be better off using my Canon gear as I already have a flash for my 1Ds mark 2 and 5D classic or am I better picking up a flash and using my OMD E-M1 and E-M5? I have the Canon 24-105 f4 that I would likely use with the DSLRs. For my OMDs I would likely use primes although I have the 12-50 kit lens. I really like my OMDs but on previous occasions where I've shot family events J used my 5D or 40D. My niece has said she wants nothing special, just photos of the day.
     
  2. azmerm

    azmerm Mu-43 Regular

    38
    Oct 10, 2013
    Phoenix
    Alan Mermelstein
    It depends on the reception lighting. If it will be a darkened room with DJ lighting I recommend you stick with your Canon and flash with focus assist. It will be much faster to focus. At receptions I switch from my EM1/12-35 combo to my Nikon D750.

    If however their is a pro photographer covering the reception I recommend you spend it eating, drinking, and dancing instead LOL!
     
  3. tyrphoto

    tyrphoto Mu-43 All-Pro

    May 25, 2014
    Seoul | NYC
    ㅇtㅈyㅅr
    Are you going to be the main photographer or was one hired and you're there just to take casual snaps?

    For flash photography, I'd stick with the Canon and put a 70-200/2.8 on the 1Ds II and a 24-70/2.8 on the 5D and call it the day if you're going to be the main photographer.

    Otherwise, if you're there just to take snaps, take your E-M1 and/or E-M5 with your favorite lens or two and have fun and enjoy the reception while casually taking some snaps here and there.
     
  4. davidzvi

    davidzvi Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 12, 2012
    Outside Boston MA
    David
    Is she asking you to be the Official Photographer?
    If so, have you shot a wedding before?
    Are you working toward becoming a wedding photographer?

    It the answer to #1 is yes and the answers to #2 &#3 are no then politely decline.
     
  5. davidzvi

    davidzvi Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 12, 2012
    Outside Boston MA
    David
    I'll add that from your information page you seem to have the equipment on the Canon side, assuming you have more than one flash. So I would stick with that setup instead of going out and getting flashes for m4/3. That and the 12-50 is not that useful for events other than for it's macro ability. And since you have nothing listed for a telephoto other than the 100-300 you would also need to get another lens as well.

    But on the Canon side you have the 24-105 and 70-200 listed. you could shoot the whole wedding with just those two. As a primary shooter you should get something like a 35mm prime at the very least to go with your 85mm for as least some kind of backup coverage.
     
  6. kinlau

    kinlau Mu-43 Top Veteran

    836
    Feb 29, 2012
    Doesn't sound like you're the primary photog if it's just the reception. Go with just the 1Dsm2 + 24-105 + flash, and the OMD with a fast prime.

    For my niece's reception, I use a 5Dm2 + 24-105 + flash, and GX-7 + 25/1.4. Worked very well. A fisheye would be fun for the dance floor.
     
  7. oldracer

    oldracer Mu-43 All-Pro

    Oct 1, 2010
    USA
    Shoot using the lenses that get you the kind of shots you like. If you like taking head shots of all the attendees, which are very popular with the B&G afterward, pick a portrait-type lens. For groups, something shorter. Personally, I am a zoom guy. 24mm (35mm equivalent) is wide enough (barely) to give a sense of space to an indoor shot. 50mm for small groups. 85mm is good for 3/4 length portraits, and for tight head shots my favorite is around 105mm.

    Try not to use flash but if you are forced into it by cave-like lighting, try to bring as much speedlite power as you can muster and plan to bounce it off the ceiling. Setting it straight up is a decent no-brainer strategy. Angling it to bounce towards your subjects (but not directly at them) will usually produce more interesting light. There are also many magic diffusers sold at all price levels. If you want to try one of these, practice ahead of time to see if you like it and to learn its foibles.

    If it is possible for you to visit the reception venue ahead of time, that is A Good Thing to do.
     
  8. wrxspdwgn

    wrxspdwgn Mu-43 Regular

    44
    Nov 12, 2012
    Wisconsin
    Thanks for all the responses. The bride and groom are already married. This is going to be a reception for extended family. It will be held in a large tent on the groom's families property in another state. I had considered using the OMD over the Canon as it is better suited for air travel. The bride asked me to be the official photographer although she said she wants nothing fancy, being my niece I don't want to let her down. Wedding photography is not something I aspire to do although I do have some experience with portraits and models in studio.
     
  9. davidzvi

    davidzvi Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 12, 2012
    Outside Boston MA
    David
    5Dc + 24-105 + flash, maybe bring the 85 if it's gets dark. You could also bring the 70-200 if that's the lens you prefer to shoot portraits with. Of course you could bring another body and flash for backup.

    In a similar setting I would shoot my D800 and 24-120 f/4. I'd use my D800 over my D750 mainly for crop. I often shoot 1.2 or DX cropped For a narrower field of view (and smaller files) so I don't need to carry multiple bodies all the time. I do have the advantage of a 15mp image in crop mode that you don't with the 5Dc.
     
  10. b_rubenstein

    b_rubenstein Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 20, 2012
    Melbourne, FL
    Tents can provide some interesting surfaces for bouncing your flash. I've done things like aiming the flash head back over my shoulder at an angled top panel. When the light bounces of it it acts as a very large soft box. Pointing the flash into corners, or sides of the tent will also give a soft directional light. Light from a flash will usually look better than sketchy available light in dim settings, if you know how to use it. Since your using a FF Canon you can get away with pretty high ISO's.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  11. wrxspdwgn

    wrxspdwgn Mu-43 Regular

    44
    Nov 12, 2012
    Wisconsin
    Thanks for sharing your thoughts on bouncing the light? With the 1Ds Mark2 and the 5D classic the ISO is limited to 3200 as I recall. I haven't used either of my full frame cameras since February and have mainly been shooting with an OMD or my 1D mark 3 for birds.
     
  12. oldracer

    oldracer Mu-43 All-Pro

    Oct 1, 2010
    USA
    A tent will be great! It will eat light though, so use the most flash that you can bring. Have fun.
     
  13. b_rubenstein

    b_rubenstein Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 20, 2012
    Melbourne, FL
    Have you personally done this? Because I have, and a SB800 shoe mount flash was all I needed with the ISO set to under 800.
     
  14. oldracer

    oldracer Mu-43 All-Pro

    Oct 1, 2010
    USA
    It's going to depend a lot on the tent and the height of the ceiling. Most recently I shot inside a tent at a graduation party and that tent just ate the light. Obviously there will be some nice white tents with lower ceilings that are better, as you found. Probably I should not have made such a blanket statement, but better too much strobe and having to turn it down than not enough for conditions.