where to go from here

Discussion in 'Native Lenses' started by rolling green, Feb 28, 2013.

  1. rolling green

    rolling green Mu-43 Regular

    81
    Dec 31, 2012
    city of chi
    need a little advice guys. Have been using the PL-25 for the past 8 months and love the lens. Bought it for the low light speed, chasing a 3 year old around the house. Fantastic lens and really improved my learning curve for correct exposure and framing. Previous setup was my beloved PEN EP-1 and kit lens.
    Where do I go from here from a learning perspective. Torn between wide and portrait. As of now (winter) I'm taking most shots indoors and love shooting kids and people but from a learning standpoint will it be beneficial to go wider? I've stuck with 1 lens and it has improved my picture taking (composition and exposure) but leaves me wanting more. Always thought my next lens would be the 75mm but is there more I can learn with a wider lens like the 12mm. I know I should buy the lens that suits my needs but at this point I'm looking to learn/improve. I know you've all been down this road and if you could do it again which direction would you choose? TIA
     
  2. WT21

    WT21 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 19, 2010
    Boston
    Wide angle is a great next step. Get up close to your subject and get shots of them in situ.
     
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  3. demiro

    demiro Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Nov 7, 2010
    I'm not sure that a specific focal length will make a difference with regard to learning. It really does depend on what you want to shoot.

    If you want to shoot birds in your back yard (if you are not in the city) or wildlife at a park then the 75/1.8 would be a good choice to learn with. It would also allow for some awesome portraits of your little one.

    If you want to shoot city-scapes or the Lake Michigan coast then the 12 seems appropriate. It is also good for street photography.

    Plenty to learn with either option I would think. Just a matter of where you want to take it. It is a skill to understand what lens you need vs what lens you want. You've done well to stick with the 25/1.4 for a while before going crazy (like so many of us do) and filling a bag with lenses without realizing what you really need.
     
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  4. Talanis

    Talanis Mu-43 Top Veteran

    509
    Oct 15, 2012
    Sherbrooke, Canada
    Eric Cote
    The best lens is the one you need, not the one you want. Ask yourself what you are missing most. Do you often lack the reach to do the pictures you would like? Go for 45 or 75. Do you often lack of space? You are at the restaurant and want to take a picture of the person in front of you but you can't without croping out part of the arm? Check for a 20mm. You live in an area with beautiful landscape and you are always frustrated because you can't reach large enough to photograph your vision? Go for the 12mm.
    If you don't ask any of these questions or don't have any frustration yet, keep your money and your 25mm and try to see what you are missing.
     
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  5. elavon

    elavon Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 1, 2012
    Tel Aviv Israel
    Ehud
    Learning depends on what you want to shot.
    I would recommend reading some photographic books.
    The best for learning exposure and camera control "Bryan Peterson - Understanding Exposure".
    Very good more advanced for improving artistic performance "The Passionate Photographer- Ten Steps Toward Becoming Great".

    A great book for advancing into light control "Light - Science and Magic"

    If you did not master Lightroom yet, I would also recommend learning it.
     
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  6. rolling green

    rolling green Mu-43 Regular

    81
    Dec 31, 2012
    city of chi
    Gosh sometimes you guys make too much sense. Where's the "just buy both" comments!
    I guess it really boils down to what I need, of course there are times when my kids scream "daddy no pictures" and could definitely use more reach and other times during family gatherings or close proximity I wish I could be wider. Chicago has beautiful buildings but I hardly find time to make it downtown, maybe 4 times a year and outside of that it's pretty darn flat out here in the burbs.
     
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  7. WT21

    WT21 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 19, 2010
    Boston
    You sound like a "home and hearth" shooter like me.

    It seems every summer I end up with a 9-18, but it's so slow, it's not great indoors. So, I end up selling it at the end of the summer, but the 14 is always in my kit.

    Another benefit of going wide angle or super-wide is that it's VERY different from what you are shooting now. So, you'll really be stretching in a new direction.

    Here are some examples:
    First the 14:
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Now the 9-18:
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
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  8. WT21

    WT21 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 19, 2010
    Boston
    Too often, I see comments about limited budgets, so I try to be sensitive to that, but if you need justification, then YES -- buy both. 12/25/75 is an AWESOME trio, and would cover just about every need you'll have. I think, IMO though, that WA is more fun and TBH, my kids love to see the goofy wide angle shots more than the sensitive portrait type shots (though the latter is what my wife wants :)
     
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  9. elavon

    elavon Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 1, 2012
    Tel Aviv Israel
    Ehud
    In term of a lens suggestion, I will go with the buy both comment.:smile:
    Since you already have a fast prime you might consider a good zoom.
    For a low budget you can get the P14-45, it is very sharp and will give you the flexibility with the price of a slower lens.
    If you want a fast zoom and can afford the price you can get the P12-35.
     
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  10. mrjr

    mrjr Mu-43 Top Veteran

    518
    Sep 25, 2012
    It sounds to me like you should buy a portrait lens. It seems like that would suit your predominant type of photography best. If I were you, that's what I'd do.

    But I'd also buy a wide. ;) There's no reason not to buy the Panasonic 14mm, even if you don't use it as frequently as your other primes. That way you'll have a wide angle for the times you need it. It would drive me nuts not to have a wide angle lens.

    I think your approach to this decision is good: Since photography is a hobby for many of us, and not our source of income, we don't have as many "needs" as a pro does, so we can ignore the same old canned "what-focal-length-do-you-normally-use?" advice, and buy something different that we can learn from.

    Have fun with the choice. :)
     
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  11. PaulGiz

    PaulGiz Mu-43 Veteran

    231
    Jan 3, 2013
    Rhode Island, USA
    Do you still have the kit lens? Why not put it on and just shoot. Check your EXIF and see which direction you gravitate towards.

    If most of your shots are in the 14-20mm range, get a 12 (if you can afford it) or a 14 (if you can't).

    If you're finding yourself moving towards the 42 mm direction then you're a candidate for the 45 or 75mm.

    P.
     
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  12. GaryAyala

    GaryAyala Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 2, 2011
    SoCal
    As a your second lens, I strongly recommend a wide, either the O12mm or P14mm if you want to stay with primes. The P12-35 would cover wide to portrait with very good I.Q., although an overlap at 25mm. Most people tend to go long/long-ish for their second lens, which they will actually shoot more wide than long.

    Wait on your third lens until you have the same feeling as you do now, that of mastery of the lens and ready to move on. While not the most fun methodology, I think it is the best way to learn photography ... to take photographs not pictures.

    Gary
     
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  13. Dave in Wales

    Dave in Wales Mu-43 All-Pro

    Nov 5, 2011
    West Wales
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  14. rolling green

    rolling green Mu-43 Regular

    81
    Dec 31, 2012
    city of chi
    lol you guys are are awesome! thanks for the help. Unfortunately I sold the kit lens to some members here. I really wish I did not but it funded my fl-600 which I love dearly.
    WT21 is spot on and I feel like a "home hearth" shooter. I'm leaning towards the wider side because I think it will really give me a drastically different perspective indoors and out. I'm going to try and make it to a full year (my initial goal) with a single lens and will probably acquire the panny 14 or oly 12. Really looking forward to the panny 42.5mm so this should hold me over until that is released. If the reviews are poor i'll go with the 75mm when time and budget allows. Thanks again everyone for your thoughts.
     
  15. ssgreenley

    ssgreenley Mu-43 Top Veteran

    509
    May 12, 2011
    Can't go wrong with the Oly 12. It was my third lens (after the kit & the 20--before the 25 was released). It quickly became, and has remained, my favorite lens. It has so much character, and i suspect it will be far more versatile indoors than the 75 would be. Good luck!
     
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  16. Bokeaji

    Bokeaji Gonzo's Dad O.*

    Aug 6, 2011
    Austin, TX
    i say figure out which type of photography you wanna work on next

    landscape and street? wider

    portrait? tele-r

    you can always do WHATEVER with either, tho

    is there a lens u like the rendering of thats on sale somewhere? tada! problem solved :D
     
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