WhatDigitalCamera reviews the GX7: Gold Award 91%

Discussion in 'Panasonic Cameras' started by MitchHamilton, Aug 17, 2013.

  1. MitchHamilton

    MitchHamilton Mu-43 Regular

    40
    Feb 16, 2010
    Banff, Alberta, Canada
    Just thought you guys might enjoy this:

    Panasonic Lumix GX7 Review | Micro System Camera Reviews | What Digital Camera

    One interesting point was they said:

    "The GX7's built-in image stabilization system works well, automatically detecting a non-IS equipped lens and delivers a comparable performance to lens-based systems with shorter focal length optics."

    Sounds promising. I'm upgrading from an E-P3 so haven't been spoiled with the life altering 5-axis IBIS from Oly. :p
     
  2. dougjgreen

    dougjgreen Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 5, 2013
    San Diego
    Doug Green
    Still absolutely ZERO example of any rigorous testing of the IBIS
     
  3. MitchHamilton

    MitchHamilton Mu-43 Regular

    40
    Feb 16, 2010
    Banff, Alberta, Canada
    I agree. I'm getting to the point where I'll have to do my own test when I get it. I think I'll try to build one of those gimmicky shake tables and share my findings with the class. :p
     
  4. b_rubenstein

    b_rubenstein Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 20, 2012
    Melbourne, FL
  5. meyerweb

    meyerweb Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Sep 5, 2011
    I agree. And I'm not sure there ever will be, since each person is unique, and the movement to be compensated for pretty random. My holding a camera on a windy hillside is different than you holding a camera on a moving ferry boat.

    The only way to do a reasonable test of IS is via statistical sampling. For a given set of conditions (e.g., same lens, platform, wind, etc.) take a large number of shots at each of a series of increasingly slower shutter speeds, with and without IS. Repeat with the item (camera, lens) you want to use for comparison.

    If you take, say 25 shots each at speeds of 1/60th, 1/30th, 1/15th, and 1/8th, with and without IS, you can then develop data along the lines below: Pretend this is the GX-7 with an unstabilzed 35mm lens.


    w/o IS: 90% sharp, 70% sharp, 30% sharp, 0% sharp
    w/ IS: 92% sharp, 85% sharp, 60% sharp, 15% sharp

    (note: all numbers are made up, for example purposes only)

    And pretend this is the same lens on the OM-D:

    w/o IS: 85% sharp, 65% sharp, 20% sharp, 0% sharp*
    w/ IS: 97% sharp, 90% sharp, 80% sharp, 50% sharp

    If you did this type of test, you could then reliably say that for YOU, the 5-way IBIS is significantly more effective than the GX-7's IBIS at 1/8th second, somewhat more effective at higher speeds.
     
  6. MajorMagee

    MajorMagee Mu-43 All-Pro

    Feb 24, 2011
    Dayton, OH
    Once upon a time Amin did a pretty decent evaluation of the OM-D and discovered the shutter shock issue, so it can be done.
     
  7. Liamness

    Liamness Mu-43 Veteran

    375
    Apr 20, 2011
    Yeah. Even on sites like photozone which are usually really rigorous, the best you get is 'the IS system gives you about 1-2 stops in general use'. It's something that depends massively on how you use the camera and what their field conditions are.
     
  8. krugorg

    krugorg Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jul 18, 2011
    Minnesota USA
    My guess is that it will perform similarly to the E-P2/3, given the weight of the body and technology (2 axis?) used.

    I am curious to see how it does with shutter shock.
     
  9. dougjgreen

    dougjgreen Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 5, 2013
    San Diego
    Doug Green
    This WOULD BE rigorous - and happens to be exactly the sort of thing I'm looking for. A range of shots, at a range of shutter speeds, with a range of lenses, with IBIS on, and off. Of course this would be particular for the specific tester, but that's the sort of example I would like to see, and which NOBODY has yet done. Several sites did in fact do this when Olympus came out with IBIS in the e-510. And they concluded it was generally good for least two stops - occasionally three, almost always at least one - hence, as a rule of thumb, two stops.

    That sort of test regime is bafflingly absent so far for the GX7. I don't seem to recall it being absent for the OM-D.
     
  10. meyerweb

    meyerweb Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Sep 5, 2011
    I'm not sure it was done before the production OM-D shipped, though. These bloggers still have, for the most part, pre-release firmware, and haven't really had it very long. That kind of testing takes time, a lot of it, both to do the shooting and to analyze the results. You're talking 200 shots for each camera, and then someone has to sit down and look at each one on a monitor and make a qualitative judgement: sharp, not sharp (and maybe "sharp enough"). Not a simple task.

    I think once the production camera has been available for a while, you may see some tests like this. I seem to recall Pekka doing something like this for the OM-D, but less rigorous; only about 5 shots for each shutter speed, I think.
     
  11. MitchHamilton

    MitchHamilton Mu-43 Regular

    40
    Feb 16, 2010
    Banff, Alberta, Canada
    I luckily work IN a camera shop so I have the resources (and perhaps the time) to do something like this. When the camera comes in (mid - late September) I'll indulge.
     
  12. dougjgreen

    dougjgreen Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 5, 2013
    San Diego
    Doug Green
    I agree that this type of test regime takes substantial time and effort. But that's quite different from the claim that it's not do-able, which some posters have claimed.
     
  13. gugarci

    gugarci Mu-43 Veteran

    304
    Jul 8, 2012
    Lyndhurst, NJ
    Bill
    This is great but I'm hoping it's color accuracy for jpg's is at least average or better. The Imaging Resources always tests for color hue accuracy and Panasonic's are always below average, even the GH3. This where Olympus shines.

    I plan to buy an E-P5 or a GX7 in the next couple of months so for the times I shoots jpg's this has to be better. Although I mainly shoot raw the Olympus jpg's are so good that I have close my gap significantly.
     
  14. RT_Panther

    RT_Panther Mu-43 Legend

    May 4, 2011
    Texas
    Why is IBIS performance such a huge point :confused:

    I ask this because "across the street", NEX users are arguably the largest population of mirrorless adapted lens users & yet none of the NEX bodies have IBIS...
     
  15. uci2ci

    uci2ci Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 22, 2012
    Los Angeles, CA
    Sam
    Its one of the selling points of mu43. im sure NEX users wouldnt mind being able to handhold a 800mm equiv lens at 1/400 shutter speed..... if they had the option :)
     
  16. RT_Panther

    RT_Panther Mu-43 Legend

    May 4, 2011
    Texas
    Agreed - I'm sure they wouldn't. :smile:
    But I haven't heard massive "where's our IBIS for legacy glass" complaints from them either.
     
  17. uci2ci

    uci2ci Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 22, 2012
    Los Angeles, CA
    Sam
    Ture. I think what we have here is one of those cases of "if we dont get it....fine...but if we do, it better be good". Its like nookie :cool:
     
  18. RT_Panther

    RT_Panther Mu-43 Legend

    May 4, 2011
    Texas
    Well,
    I think that what we can agree upon is that a good IBIS is just as important to some as a rangefinder style integrated EVF body is for others :smile:
     
  19. jpark1982

    jpark1982 Mu-43 Regular

    57
    Aug 3, 2013
    The #1 requested feature from NEX users has been IBIS. Snce it was never feasible, the outcry isn't there. But if they got it and the next body didn't have it, oh boy, look out.
     
  20. RT_Panther

    RT_Panther Mu-43 Legend

    May 4, 2011
    Texas
    Hmmm...I own a NEX & belong to some NEX communities and I haven't seen much of this....Now I have seen some complaints about native E-Mount lenses that aren't stabilized...

    (Or else I wasn't paying attention)...