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What is this bug?

Discussion in 'Nature' started by RonSmith, Jun 27, 2010.

  1. RonSmith

    RonSmith Mu-43 Top Veteran

    505
    Apr 7, 2010
    Michigan
    They just don't teach this stuff in law school. Shame actually.

    G1 45/2.8
    1/250 @ 5.6 100ISO

    4736986755_5b57ed04b5_b.
     
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  2. Brian S

    Brian S Mu-43 Top Veteran

    714
    Apr 11, 2009
    That is a Bug that admires your camera.

    The ones in my Backyard are not as impressed with mine.
     
  3. Streetshooter

    Streetshooter Administrator Emeritus

    Dec 15, 2009
    Phila, Pa USA
    I hate the mosquitoes in my back yard but they really love me....

    That one seems to be related to a dragonfly of some type......
     
  4. Bug?

    Me thinks it be ye old damselfly in non-distress! :smile:
     
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  5. RonSmith

    RonSmith Mu-43 Top Veteran

    505
    Apr 7, 2010
    Michigan
    That's it! Thank you.
     
  6. grebeman

    grebeman Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 13, 2010
    South Brent, south Devon (UK)
    Barrie
    Certainly a damselfly by the way it holds its wings at rest, but being from the otherside of the pond not one I've seen before, rather understated colours so it might be a teneral (i.e. newly hatched and not yet reached sexual maturity), thanks for sharing that one.

    Barrie
     
  7. cosinaphile

    cosinaphile Mu-43 All-Pro

    Dec 26, 2009
    new york city
    for me most insects are of the order flyawayicus fromylenseicus

    nice capture there
     
  8. grebeman

    grebeman Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 13, 2010
    South Brent, south Devon (UK)
    Barrie
    Patience and old fashioned stalking techniques Cosina

    [​IMG]

    Barrie
     
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  9. cosinaphile

    cosinaphile Mu-43 All-Pro

    Dec 26, 2009
    new york city
    the detail and structure of the wings really are something


    ive tried to aproach dragon flies but with limited sucess
     
  10. grebeman

    grebeman Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 13, 2010
    South Brent, south Devon (UK)
    Barrie
    I failed to specify the lens details above, the shot was taken with a 105mm macro lens which is about optimum to just keep you outside the circle of comfort for the insect. Temperature has some part to play, the warmer it is the more flighty the insect, so early morning or late evening shots are likely to be more successful, at the start of the day the insect is cooler and at the end of the day it's flight instinct is beginning to subside as it seeks a resting place for the night.
    As with so many subjects it can be a question of knowing your subject, hence my poor success rate with photographs of people, I just don't understand them.

    Barrie