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What is the "Sensor Cleaning" feature in the Setup menu?

Discussion in 'Panasonic Cameras' started by Randall Gabriel, Aug 22, 2015.

  1. Randall Gabriel

    Randall Gabriel Mu-43 Rookie

    16
    Aug 19, 2015
    What does it do?
     
  2. wjiang

    wjiang Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Uses ultrasonic vibrations to try and shake dust off the sensor.
     
  3. Randall Gabriel

    Randall Gabriel Mu-43 Rookie

    16
    Aug 19, 2015
    I tried it and it didn't do anything. Pretty odd. Isn't it supposed to make a sound when it does that? Mine didn't make any sound whatsoever.
     
  4. agentlossing

    agentlossing Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jun 26, 2013
    Andrew Lossing
    Not really, you can hear it on some of the older models but it's primary not a vibration kind of thing.
     
  5. Randall Gabriel

    Randall Gabriel Mu-43 Rookie

    16
    Aug 19, 2015
    OK, I see. There's a tiny spec of dust on my sensor and it didn't do a thing to get rid of it. Might have to get a Rocket blower for it.
     
  6. agentlossing

    agentlossing Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jun 26, 2013
    Andrew Lossing
    Sensor glass is extremely resilient, I've used a q-tip to nudge stubborn dust specks many times. Air blowers are good to have to get rid of them once they're dislodged though.
     
  7. Randall Gabriel

    Randall Gabriel Mu-43 Rookie

    16
    Aug 19, 2015
    So it's okay to use a q-tip to clean that tiny dust spec on my Lumix G5 sensor?
     
  8. agentlossing

    agentlossing Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jun 26, 2013
    Andrew Lossing
    What you look at as the "sensor" is actually a filter stack between the sensor and the outside world. As long as you don't treat it in a way that would damage sensitive filter glass or coatings then you can't really hurt it. A clean swab just barely nudging a dirt speck (not dragging it across the glass with force) won't hurt anything. Often the specks just dab off and you're good to go. It's also possible to introduce very fine dust specks with q-tips though, so a rocket blower is a good thing to have on hand, just in case.
     
  9. wjiang

    wjiang Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Rocket blowers are generally better to try first. They're guaranteed to be clean (unlike cloths and other physical objects), and get rid of most of the loose stuff so you don't end up spreading it around if you do end up having to physically clean it.
     
  10. tkbslc

    tkbslc Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    I would not. I would use a rocket blower to blow the debris off. If that failed, I would do a wet cleaning with a product designed to clean a sensor.



    The word "ultrasonic" implies it is a frequency that is above our ability to hear.
     
  11. agentlossing

    agentlossing Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jun 26, 2013
    Andrew Lossing
    A wet cleaning for a stubborn speck is overkill. Just nudge it off. I don't see why people get so terrified of their filter stack. I've done this many times, almost always use a compressed air canister to remove dust, and have wet cleaned, and never have done any damage to any of my cameras, but I'd only recommend wet cleaning your sensor if it's very dirty.
     
  12. Randall Gabriel

    Randall Gabriel Mu-43 Rookie

    16
    Aug 19, 2015
    Well, I'd already went ahead and used a can of compressed air to blow out the dust on my sensor. Of course, I sprayed the air very lightly and it seems to have done the job. I took a 2 second exposure at an aperture of f/22 (largest aperture supposedly allows you to see the dust) whilst aiming it at a brightly lit piece of white paper and I haven't seen one spec of dust in the photo. So for anyone who doesn't want to order a Rocket Air Blaster and go through the hassle of waiting for it to arrive - just go to your local hardware store and pick up a can of compressed air to clean your sensor. It does the job fairly well.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  13. agentlossing

    agentlossing Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jun 26, 2013
    Andrew Lossing
    I use compressed air all the time, but be careful, just don't shake the canister or tilt it when using. Pre-spray something other than the camera first so you know it's not going to shoot propellant onto your sensor (that happened to me once, but of course after wet cleaning it everything was fine). There are quite a few people who will have a coronary when you tell them you use compressed air on your sensor, but it really is the most effective and expedient way to deal with stubborn dust. Rocket blowers are very weak by comparison.