What do you use for video editing/authoring?

iliakoltsov

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Aug 7, 2010
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Paris
I recently had a quick look at the video editing software and or transcoding , i needed for an interview.

Opensource software are just great for transcoding:

Handbrake ( available Win/MAC/linux)
Avidemux ( Available Win Mac /linux)
VLC (available Win/Mac/linux)

In fact a combination between avidemux using ffmpeg and VLC covers most of the available digital video cameras standards including PRO file formats from panasonic or sony in terms of transcoding.

Here is a little doc about it :
http://www.ffmpeg.org/general.html#SEC4

For editing as i am on linux:

Cinelerra ( as far as i know Linux only )
Kdeenlive ( Linux /Mac )
Openshot ( as far as i know Linux only )

The best thing is that all of that is completely free.
 

Krang

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Feb 19, 2010
Messages
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You can get the files directly to Final Cut(pro), with the "log and transfer" option. It also works if you copy the PRIVATE folder to your hd. It's quite fast, since it's with minimal transcoding… By default it saves the files to the current projects folder.

It also supports adding final cut "metadata" to the files.
 

stratokaster

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I use iMovie for basic editing and Final Cut Express when I need something more sophisticated.

iMovie also imports AVCHD files and transcodes them to QuickTime using Apple Intermediate Codec - the best format for editing in Final Cut.
 

Boston Chris

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I like CS5 Premiere Pro best right now, natively edits AVCHD 1080 24p / 720 60p .mts files. Can work with adobe after effects to do a range of stylizing and color. Magic bullet software like Looks and Moho work really well with CS5. The mercury playback engine is great if your pc can handle it, renders stuff faster then mac book pro laptop, granted the pc is higher spec'd.

On my mac I edit in final cut studio 3 only after using clipwrap to rewrap the .mts files as .mov then final cut works great with the AVCHD footage.
CS5 on mac is a good option too, but when my PC is higher spec'd I prefer using that computer for the faster render time.
 

haakor

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Vancouver
I'd put in another vote for Premiere CS5. Its not cheap, but if you have Photoshop for your pictures are are keen to get into video you can get a version of it with some of their software bundles and then never have to worry about transcoding footage.

The inter-connectivity with After Effects and the rest of their suite is fantastic for doing titles, colour grading or removing a little bit of camera shake while you're at it. You need a pretty beefy machine to run it all, but if you want to cut HD video thats just how its going to be.
 

dixeyk

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On a Mac I use iMovie or Final Cut Express/Final Cut Pro (depending on how much I have to spend) as they transcode AVCHD files to QuickTime automatically. On a Windows machine I would use Premiere Elements or if you have the cash Premiere CS5. If I have the option I typically use the Mac as I find it deals with media files more easily and there are less issues that come up as a result of file incompatibilities. I also have a lot more experience with Final Cut Express/Pro so I go with the tool I know best. In the end however, either platform gets the job done and there are more than enough good tools to make the job pretty straight forward.
 

tamoio

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north and south america
Adobe Premier Pro CS5 (CS5 Production Bundle) on a custom built (by me)workstation:

Antec case
Asus P6t mobo
INTEL i7 980
Corsair 750w PS
12gb Corsair RAM
Asus Nvidia gtx470 gpu
win7 64b
seagate system and media drives 3TB total

I was an AVID MC editor for about 6 years and PP CS5 sort of reminds me of FCP when it first came out, it will do just about everything you need for 99% of your content creation chores, what it won't do you can do in PS or AE. Ingests and cuts AVCHD native and render free for any of the transitions or effects I use (including rescale and time remapping).

If full Premiere Pro CS5 or the bundle look pricey to you check out the education discounts. Its almost worth it to enroll in a few classes for that alone!
 

Dinobe

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Lochristi, Belgium
Video is something I don't do very much. Many years ago did some work in Adobe Premiere, but lately I've been using DaVinci Resolv, there is a free version with more features than I'll ever need

[edit]
Didn't notice you were on Linux.... I don't believe there is a linux version available
 

wjiang

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Christchurch, New Zealand
Video is something I don't do very much. Many years ago did some work in Adobe Premiere, but lately I've been using DaVinci Resolv, there is a free version with more features than I'll ever need

[edit]
Didn't notice you were on Linux.... I don't believe there is a linux version available
DVR 15 has official Linux support.
Some very useful stuff about it here: How To Install DaVinci Resolve 15 In Ubuntu, Linux Mint Or Debian (Generate DEB Package) - Linux Uprising Blog
 
D

Deleted member 28510

Guest
Hello all,

I started off using Windows Movie Maker 6, it's the best of the free offerings and there is a 64 bit version (Win 7, 8, 8.1, 10) here: Blaine's Movie Maker Blog: Installing Windows Movie Maker 6.0 on Windows 7, 8, 8.1 or 10 and a link on the page to all sorts of add on's. There's a bust forum as well.

Eventually I realised that I needed layers and masks and to be able to design my own effects. I tried every trial version I could find and in the end opted for cheapest Cyberlink Power Director 14 Ultra. In many ways it's like Photoshop anything I want to do there will be a way of doing it. It's fast with no restriction on rendering like some of the others where you have to pay more money to get something better, in that respect it's the same as the most expensive version which just has more auto bells and whistles.

This 1 minute clip is from a video called Bickham B's began by an art call which asked applicants to use some fonts for inspiration. I chose Bickham Script and this clip is called Beamer, video slang for projector.


This is a screenshot of the PD14 timeline showing the layers.

Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)


Cheers
 

KBeezie

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Karl Blessing
I'm using Davinci Resolve Studio 15.3.1 for most of my editing/grading. (Resolve is free, but I bought the Studio version back when it was version 12, when they dropped the price from $1,000 to $300, and I wanted most of the Studio features like multiple GPU, noise reduction, etc, and the dongle still works with 16 Beta4)

However on output if it's something I want to be crisp for vimeo or youtube without it being too big, I'll render it out as DNxHD/HR, then use Handbrake to encode to H.264 with some tweaks. Because honestly Davinci resolve doesn't do a great job at handling H.264, especially as a source (as a result most of my sources are transcoded to DNxHR/HD before being bought into Resolve for editing).

In regards to a "trick" I'm experimenting with, I'm using Adobe Media Encoder to take the GH4's 8-bit 4:2:0 Cinema 4K files, and transcoding them to 10-bit 4:4:4 2K/1080p files. (When reducing 4x the resolution to a supporting format, 4:2:0 can most certainly translate to 4:4:4, the 8-bit to 10-bit not so much, the available luma data ends up being something like 8.5-bit but since it's still more than 8-bit it still gets held in a 10-bit container). Whether or not there's a big enough benefit in grading results to justify the time and storage being an entirely different debate (higher color fidelity/tonality and dynamic range at the cost of resolution).

But in the end, I'm still mainly going to use Davinci Resolve + Handbrake. And least one software for transcoding to DNxHD LB/SQ/HQ (Depending on how much detail my source file has) to make editing more compatible. Handbrake itself is only best for putting out to H.264/H.265, but it's processor intensive to decode and work with in a non-linear editor. (FFMpeg will do it into an MXF wrapper, but it's a bit more work than drag/drop like you could with Adobe Media Encoder or Aiseesoft [which won't do over 1080p for DNxHD])

edit : Actually far as #1 below, you can use MPeg Streamclip (Squared 5 - MPEG Streamclip video converter for Windows XP/Vista/7) for free for the initial transcoding, you'll just need to get the Avid DNxHD/HR codec installed first for the option to show up.

Nutshell :
1) I transcode my H.264/AVCHD source from either my Hacked GH1 or new GH4 to DNxHD/HR for faster-more-compatible editing
2) Load it up in Davinci Resolve Studio 15.3.1
3) Edit/Grade/etc/etc
4) Export as a DNxHD/HR (usually not much more than SQ or HQ if I'm doing 1080p output intended for Vimeo/Youtube
5) Encode it to H.264 with 2-pass encoding with Handbrake (Because it does H264/265 way better than Resolve)

Everything here I've done with Davinci Resolve. I prefer it to Adobe Premiere.
Videos – Karl Blessing Photography
 
Last edited:

D7k1

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Nov 18, 2013
Messages
2,107
I've been using VegasPro for a long (the Movie Studio Version IMHO is a great deal for most folks). Since Magix took over there have been 4 major upgrades and quite a few free "minor" upgrades. If I were using BM cameras I might switch, but I've got too much "muscle memory" to switch at this stage. I also use MercalliPRO for stabilization (although VP 16 builtin stabilization is much better now), and I use SoundForge and Samplitude for sound editing and making music for videos, Handbreak for transcoding. Most editors are great if you have one thing: a computer that is ready for video editing (especially 4K now days). Most of the NLE now provide "proxies" which means you can work in 1080, and yet in the end render to 4K which puts a lot less stress on your computer, especially if you are doing 4K 60FPS or 6k 30FPS. Actually, if you are just starting out either the VegasPRO Suite or Resolve Studio (now comes with an NLE but I don't know if it is MIDI production friendly) are complete systems only lack one thing and that is music/wav/midi composition tools like Samplitude (there are others, even Samplitude Music Studio matched with Movie Studio makes a great system for folks starting or who don't need the special tools found in the proversions). Determine what your needs are carefully before you start, learning a new system is expensive and complex especially if there is not a "lite" version available.
 

ZapWizard

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May 18, 2018
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Austin, TX
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Joshua
So I have been using Davinci Resolve (Free) for a few videos this month Including road-trips from Dash-cam footage with over 200 clips to sort through. It has been amazing. So much easier to use than anything else, and so much faster. You can scrub through your input clips with such speed that finding the shot you want is simple. Even after you place the clip, you can drag the video left/right to move the start and end frames without altering the other shots.

Animating images and titles was simple to do, after I watched their 45 minute tutorial. I have gotten so much more done. No longer do I have to look up a 3 hour video on how to access the simplest features like I did with Adobe Premiere. I also never have to wait for the video to re-buffer. Playback is instant and full speed, even at 4K resolutions and with video files stored on NAS.

Perhaps now I will actually enjoy making videos.
 

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