What car brand you drive? POLL

Zeus1

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Belgium, small town between Antwerp and Ghent
Best car I ever had was a Toyota LandCruiser. Had to dump it, due to entry restrictions in Belgian towns (Euro 4 diesel no longer permitted). Had it 10 years and drove nearly 300.000 km without problems. Giant car booth; going on holiday with the family and You could stow everything in it without showing.

Now drive a semi-electric Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV because of the tax benefits offered in Belgium.
 

StanS

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Apr 16, 2017
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Crawley, West Sussex UK / Plovdiv, Bulgaria
My first (and so far only) car: a 2003 Toyota Celica. I'm quite happy with it so far.
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Stanga

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I owned high powered European turbo sports cars over fifteen years. I doubt I'll ever own another car that fast and expensive again. But environmental restrictions in London meant that I had to sell the last one in 2017. So I now drive a Hyundai IX20 1.6 auto. Absolute brilliant for London and my style of driving. I just wish that they made it in a 2.0 litre version. Or even a hybrid. I miss that initial off the line surge.
 

Acraftman

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Jan 7, 2017
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I bought a brand new ford f-150 lariat fully loaded extended cab in 2005 I am a builder by trade so it has seen a lot of use as far as a working vehicle is concerned, it has never been garaged and has pulled a trailer with three or four motorcycles around the U.S. at least four times , I drove it to New Foundland last summer with two bikes in the back.
I had my neighbors one meter thick tree fall on it and take off the whole back end they did a awesome repair job, when I'm doing 70mph on the highway it sounds like a well preforming airliner at cruising speed very quiet and smooth. My wife drives a lexus 350 and I think my truck is at least as good if not a little smoother.
260,000 thousand miles with no engine or trans problems so very happy except for just doing the math at average 13 mpg x $2.25 per gallon ( I get 9mpg towing the trailer) comes out to about $45,000 sometimes its better to just enjoy the ride.
 

alex66

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This fine near 30 year old machine, we can sleep in it and cook in it, need to work out off grid coffee making. The white Focus is my wives, it has been quite solid given the miles she has to do.
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MichailK

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Nov 6, 2017
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Thessaly, Greece
very happy except for just doing the math at average 13 mpg x $2.25 per gallon ( I get 9mpg towing the trailer) comes out to about $45,000 sometimes its better to just enjoy the ride.
so your F-150 consumes 18 litters/100kms and you pay about 50 eurocents per liter so
it costs you about 9 eurocents per km

over here, i usually drive this 17 yo economical little 1.3 automatic demon and when just doing errands I average around 7 litters/100kms (about 33 mpg US) and at our gas prices of 1,40 euros per litter it means
it costs me 9.8 eurocents per km :(

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Joined
Apr 20, 2020
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1,246
Location
Beaumaris, Melbourne, Australia
I really like back wheel drive cars, especially in the winter! Because with back wheel drive you feel when the back starts to drift and can compensate or drift if that is what you want!

Every year I try to go to an empty parking lot when the first snow appears, just to practice drifting with the car, this is to be prepared for the winter, and just fun.
Front wheel drive cars almost always surprise you when they loose traction, back wheel drive cars are consistent and you can feel the start of loosing traction.
Four wheel drive I have yet to learn how to handle, it takes longer it seems until it looses traction and when it does it seems to handle a bit like a back wheel drive car.

I hope we get a real winter this year so I can learn!
Bo, with constant all wheel drive and viscous limited slip diffs, all that becomes academic ...
 
Joined
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Knoxville, TN
Here's our trusty Subaru Outback climbing into Arches NP. It was rock solid on our 7000+ mile trip.

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BosseBe

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Stockholm, Sweden
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Bo, with constant all wheel drive and viscous limited slip diffs, all that becomes academic ...
Well, I did manage to get in a skid last winter even with 4 wheel drive! Probably black ice on the road, but it went OK.
What I need to learn is how it behaves when it really looses traction on all 4 wheels, that is probably a very unusual situation but I want to be prepared.
Ooh, have to mention that I don't use studded winter tires, just friction tires. Since I mostly drive in the city, studded tires are not really need and even banned on some streets.
 

Biro

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Jersey Shore
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Well, I did manage to get in a skid last winter even with 4 wheel drive! Probably black ice on the road, but it went OK.
What I need to learn is how it behaves when it really looses traction on all 4 wheels, that is probably a very unusual situation but I want to be prepared.
Ooh, have to mention that I don't use studded winter tires, just friction tires. Since I mostly drive in the city, studded tires are not really need and even banned on some streets.
The truth about AWD and 4WD, Bo, is that most of its use comes in getting you started from a stop in snowy and icy conditions.

That isn't to say that it has no use while you're in motion. But it is absolutely no guarantee that you won't slide or skid. You are wise to set a goal of learning the vehicle's behavior when traction is lost.

And, as I'm sure you already know, a good set of winter tires (I recommend Nokians) can be even more effective than AWD/4WD by itself. Together, they're a fantastic winter combination.
 
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The truth about AWD and 4WD, Bo, is that most of its use comes in getting you started from a stop in snowy and icy conditions.

That isn't to say that it has no use while you're in motion. But it is absolutely no guarantee that you won't slide or skid. You are wise to set a goal of learning the vehicle's behavior when traction is lost.

And, as I'm sure you already know, a good set of winter tires (I recommend Nokians) can be even more effective than AWD/4WD by itself. Together, they're a fantastic winter combination.
In snowy conditions I often see more AWD and 4WD vehicles slid off, than single axle drives. Over confidence and stupidity is a dangerous mix. Twenty miles south of me is where northbound I-15 drivers often encounter their first snow. It's a major cluster in bad weather.
 

danelkins

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Mar 9, 2013
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Norhtern Illinois
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(slightly modified) Subaru Forester XT. I have owned many cars but this is only the second automobile that I have kept longer than 4 years – mostly owned used cars for 2-3 years and would get bored with or more interested in another. It is a great all around driver.
 

BosseBe

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Stockholm, Sweden
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The truth about AWD and 4WD, Bo, is that most of its use comes in getting you started from a stop in snowy and icy conditions.

That isn't to say that it has no use while you're in motion. But it is absolutely no guarantee that you won't slide or skid. You are wise to set a goal of learning the vehicle's behavior when traction is lost.

And, as I'm sure you already know, a good set of winter tires (I recommend Nokians) can be even more effective than AWD/4WD by itself. Together, they're a fantastic winter combination.
In snowy conditions I often see more AWD and 4WD vehicles slid off, than single axle drives. Over confidence and stupidity is a dangerous mix. Twenty miles south of me is where northbound I-15 drivers often encounter their first snow. It's a major cluster in bad weather.
Well, 4 Wheel drive for me also means more ground clearance, so 10 cm of snow is no problem even up a steep hill (My brother in his Volvo V70 had to park below the hill).

When I first started to go to a empty parking lot at first snow maybe 30 years ago, it was mostly for fun, but I soon realised that it helped me be prepared for the winter.
You do tend to forget how it was last winter and a quick refresh is crucial. So I will try to drift around a parking lot for fun and for practice.

As I said I use good winter tires (friction not studded), the ones I buy are among the best in the tests that the newspapers and car magazines do. Nokian Hakkapelita is of course among the top tires every year.

The first snow is always a surprise to most people, I have had to leave my car at work and go by the underground instead when the first snow appeared.
The big problem is the other people on the road, those that can't handle a little bit of snow and think they can drive as usual, they often get stuck or into an accident.
(I am of course an expert driver and never do anything wrong! :oops:)
 

MichailK

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Thessaly, Greece
@BosseBe the general rule for permanent drive AWD or activated 4WD cars is that when anything happens, first move aim with the steering wheel, second move floor the throttle pedal, third move adjust steering&throttle accordingly

of course there are myriads of conditions/space available/power-output-vs-grip exceptions that nullify the rule but in general it works, the car stops wobbling around and, like a cat slipping on the floor in the wrong direction, grabs with all wheels to the direction dictated by the steering wheel and saves the day- of course some times it is better to bang on a wall than fight to avoid it and end up over the cliff or try to keep on the road and face a 38 tonne truck head on vs ditching softly on a plowed field

this is the problem with AWD, it feels so well planted in adverse conditions until it is not which happens all too late and fiercely to be able to save it (unless you drift it on command in advance which mess up the groceries in the boot) - on rough conditions never rely on AWD, just forget it is there and drive like a 2WD car so AWD will be giving you headroom in the background to avoid bumping on the obstacles and you won‘t be cought off-guard
 
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