Went Out And Shot A Reenactment Today

Discussion in 'Open Discussion' started by RT_Panther, Jul 6, 2013.

  1. RT_Panther

    RT_Panther Mu-43 Legend

    May 4, 2011
    Texas
    Saw 2 NEX cameras and 0 Micro Four Thirds (other than mine)
    Rest were all DSLRs compacts, and super-zooms...

    Oh well...
     
  2. Lawrence A.

    Lawrence A. Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 14, 2012
    New Mexico
    Larry
    What was the re-enactment? Will you post some shots?

    I can't say I see a lot of m4/3 cameras out in the wild, though I guess the format is more popular elsewhere in the world. Still, this is a huge market, and half frame was pretty much killed in the film era because Kodak would not support it and it didn't catch on in the U.S. (I don't know about Europe). But Kodak, who supported the 4/3 format, t least enough to make some pretty good sensors in the beginning, is gone this time.
     
  3. RT_Panther

    RT_Panther Mu-43 Legend

    May 4, 2011
    Texas
    Pacific Theater WW-II....Might post some later on after I rewind.
    I hear ya' about Kodak. They had a good chance of being a major sensor source for Micro Four Thirds but alas', we know what has transpired...:frown:
     
  4. RT_Panther

    RT_Panther Mu-43 Legend

    May 4, 2011
    Texas
  5. battleaxe

    battleaxe Mu-43 Top Veteran

    That is what I am noticing more recently. I am also seeing more Fuji X series than m4/3, but that could be a regional/city thing. Maybe some of has to do with the fact there is a few Sony stores in the area, and Best Buys here had the NEX upfront, while the E-PM1 was harder to find. On the other hand lenses for both system were upfront equally.
     
  6. caimi

    caimi Mu-43 All-Pro

    Apr 13, 2012
    middle US
    Caimi caimiphotography.com
    Okay, my curiosity is getting the better of me and forcing me to make this inquiry even though I suspect it could be taken the wrong way. It is meant as curiosity because I truly do not understand the war reenactment thing.

    First, a disclaimer: I firmly believe in the motto, different strokes for different folks. I do not desire or intend to offend anyone reading this.

    So here goes: Why do people re-enact war? I can see it when done in a theatrical movie in which a theme is presented in support of the reenactment. But when it is done on a warm summer afternoon with no context other than perhaps sheer entertainment, I have to ask, where's the entertainment? Why not reenact gruesome murders? Why not reenact ugly divorces? Why not reenact the death of your favorite dog? You get my drift? It seems odd to want to either participate in or to witness something so awful as war without some contextual theme to wrap around it. And I admit, I have not attended a war reenactment. Perhaps lectures on the brutality and ugliness of war are given beforehand? Please educate me.

    By the way, your images are very good. It's the subject matter I am having trouble with.
     
  7. metalmania

    metalmania Mu-43 Veteran

    244
    Jul 19, 2012
    NYC
    Nice shots with historical tune.
     
  8. RT_Panther

    RT_Panther Mu-43 Legend

    May 4, 2011
    Texas
    Fantastic question! - And here's my answer.
    For what these people did (National Museum Of the Pacific War), I'd call it a "Living History" lesson rather than a re-enactment.

    A good hour was spent by the actors doing the following:

    1) Describing the pre-war situation in Japan (resources, personalities, politics, etcetera) & what led to them wanting to expand.
    2) Describing America's pre-war situation
    3) Describing both Japan & America's situation at the outbreak of the war
    4) Describing Japanese Admirals & Generals and the orders they faced from the homeland.
    5) Describing American Generals, Admirals, and MOH recipients
    6) Describing Japanese weapons, and battlefield tactics
    7) Describing American weapons, and battlefield tactics

    Phew! - I think I got them all in. :redface: Anyways, the above took more than an hour.

    The actual "re-enactment" (Battle of Tarawa) took less than a half-hour. So this is why I call it a "Living History" lesson rather than a re-enactment.

    And as far as war goes, you're absolutely correct - it's ugly. I just retired effective this month from the USAF after 24yrs of service (1989 - 2013) and I've seen my fair share of conflicts. What these folks are doing here is preserving history through sights, sounds, smells, & knowledge.

    Again, excellent question though! :smile:
     
  9. caimi

    caimi Mu-43 All-Pro

    Apr 13, 2012
    middle US
    Caimi caimiphotography.com
    Thanks, RT. Good to know these things don't happen in a vacuum.
     
  10. phidauex

    phidauex Mu-43 Regular

    76
    Jun 17, 2013
    Boulder, CO
    Excellent photos - the processing does help seat them in the era.

    I've wondered this myself. I think it has something to do with trying to make sense of it all - a huge number of people in the US have family who were involved in the war, and trying to understand what they went through is a fascination/obsession for many.

    While it is totally against my normal nature, I have spent a very large amount of time researching WWII aircraft, battle records, reading stories, etc. since both my grandfathers served, and both died before I was born. All I have are these fragmented stories, pictures from a very different world, and a few bits of clothing. War is a terrible thing (it ruined my grandfather's lives, and led to their early deaths), but it is still much harder to understand than something small, like a dog dying, or a divorce. It takes a lot more work to integrate the reality of what happened into your life so you can continue to move on, and I think reenactments may serve as part of that for some people.

    EDIT: Excellent explanation by RT_Panther above, posted just before I posted this. My explanation is more "personal" while his better addresses the societal reasons for having such things.
     
  11. RT_Panther

    RT_Panther Mu-43 Legend

    May 4, 2011
    Texas
    :smile:
    Note: the first 2 pictures that I posted are of 2 actors describing some of the events/things that I stated earlier for each side. The USMC General actor is adjusting his earpiece and microphone so the audience can hear him narrate & describe the events.
     
  12. Savas K

    Savas K Mu-43 Top Veteran

    784
    Jan 10, 2013
    A re-enactment I attended earlier this season was about World War II with the Korean war as an adjunct. Part of the displays included actual photographer's gear from the period including a rolling darkroom trailer. There was correspondent's gear in a tent for typing and transmitting breaking news from the battlefield.

    A show and tell of the Pacific theater included how rough it was. Not only was the enemy committed, but the theater consisted of jungle; miles of it. This, as opposed to the European theater where civilization was located, replete with everything seen in small towns of the era. When taking a break, a soldier could visit a bar to have a drink or spend time with a fair maiden. No such thing occurred in the Pacific.
     
  13. GaryAyala

    GaryAyala Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 2, 2011
    SoCal
    I'm with caimi on this one ... the difference being I've been to a few "reenactments". My opinion ... it's a bunch of grown-ups playing war. Like RT, I've experienced conflict and war ... and playing war ... well ... I just find it disturbing. To me playing war adds a glorification of distortion to a severely ugly side of humanity.

    Despite my opinion, I haven't any condemnation for those who participate ... for me it is similar to home town theatre, just one in bad taste.

    Gary

    PS- I do appreciate the actor's attention to detail.
    G
     
  14. RT_Panther

    RT_Panther Mu-43 Legend

    May 4, 2011
    Texas
    Gary,
    While I understand you 100% here I must stress that this was an educational/documentary type of event. Again, over an hour was spent by the actors purely on educational narrative with small demonstrations here and there. The re-enactment/living history event itself was a mere 15-20 minutes max.

    There were also many WW-II veterans in the audience themselves to which the actors acknowledged them all by service, name, and rank...and of course, they all received standing ovations. Then all veterans in the audience were also acknowledge.

    But I do get your point fully about playing war....I don't understand it myself either.
     
  15. GaryAyala

    GaryAyala Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 2, 2011
    SoCal
    There's no right or wrong ... you can call it education, and there is definitely that component, probably which more so at your reenactment than the one's I attended ... and someone else can call it window dressing to hide the real intent of play war. And to a greater and lesser extent we are both right and both wrong.

    But reenactments do make for interesting photo opps.

    Gary
     
  16. Savas K

    Savas K Mu-43 Top Veteran

    784
    Jan 10, 2013
    Ones participating at the show I attended were veterans of war and police; the police either active or retired. Veterans included from Viet Nam and later conflicts. One man I spoke with dealt in memorabilia and was in numerous History channel and similar shows. Participants owned their own equipment, including howitzer, long range canon, tanks; stuff unimaginably large causing wonder as to where this equipment is housed when not on display.
     
  17. GaryAyala

    GaryAyala Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 2, 2011
    SoCal
    I did a story once on a guy who collected trains ... full size train cars. He built a little station in his backyard complete with water tank. (Granted he had a good size back yard, but it was in Alhambra, CA.)

    Train-Collector---HP-XL.

    Gary
     
  18. Savas K

    Savas K Mu-43 Top Veteran

    784
    Jan 10, 2013
    Wild. Nice pic, Gary.




    Hey, look what's backing into the neighbor's driveway!!

    p1830080326-4.
     
  19. GaryAyala

    GaryAyala Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 2, 2011
    SoCal
    That's what I call home defense.

    Gary

    PS- Looks like its aimed in your direction.
    G