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Visiting NYC

Discussion in 'Open Discussion' started by Etude, Mar 12, 2015.

  1. Etude

    Etude Long Exposure Addict

    202
    Jun 24, 2013
    Dear all,


    I am visiting NYC and will like to ask some questions.


    1. Is permit required for shooting and with tripod at Brooklyn Bridge Park and Fulton Ferry? Is it safe around that area at night as I may be alone by myself?


    2. I understand that tripods are not allowed on ESB and TOTR. The question is can I use a clamp at ESB? My clamp --> http://static.red-dot-21.com/img/product/22706/default_d6wjernot0takeway-clampod-1.jpg


    3. From my experience, shooting cityscape at night/dusk on weekdays is better than weekends due to office lights being turned on. Is this the same for Manhattan?


    4. Is tripod ok in Times Square? Hoping to photograph human movement at Times Square.


    Many thanks in advance
     
  2. gryphon1911

    gryphon1911 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Mar 13, 2014
    Central Ohio, USA
    Andrew
    For ESB, you might want to read this:
    http://www.esbnyc.com/visit-empire-state-building/faq#t41n284

    There are statements in there about tripods, monopods and use of "professional cameras". The last one not being defined...so I don't know what they classify as "professional".

    My gut feeling is that if they are that strict about support systems, clamps are probably not permitted either.

    Brooklyn Bridge Park:
    http://www.brooklynbridgepark.org/pages/film-and-photography-permits

    Some additional info:
    http://www.largeformatphotography.info/forum/showthread.php?39373-NYC-Tripod-rules
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2015
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  3. arch stanton

    arch stanton Mu-43 Veteran

    411
    Feb 25, 2012
    London
    Malc
    I shot for about an hour with a little pedco ultrapod II balanced on a stone column at TOTR last month - had the 35-100/2.8 on the cam most of the time, plenty of folks with much bigger gear and tripods.

    Definitely wait for building lights to come on at blue hour, the effect is gorgeous! I think the view's better there as Empire is in shot from the Rock ;)

    Oh, lots of people with tripods at Times Sq - fire away! Worst that'll happen is someone asks you to put it away...keep a tabletop for that, I've never been stopped balancing one of those on something with a mu43 camera.
     
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  4. bassman

    bassman Mu-43 Top Veteran

    678
    Apr 22, 2013
    New Jersey
    Scott
    The only problem with tripods in Times Square is the crowd, there's nothing illegal about it. The steps at the north end of the plaza - technically Duffy Square - does restrict tripods and monopods.

    The ESB is a pain; they also restrict backpacks and bags.
     
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  5. pdk42

    pdk42 One of the "Eh?" team

    Jan 11, 2013
    Leamington Spa, UK
    I tried to use a small tripod with my E-M5 on TOTR and was told to put it away. I asked why the guy next to me with a Nikon D800 on a clamp was OK. The security guard just looked at me blankly and said "he's not using a tripod"!
     
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  6. b_rubenstein

    b_rubenstein Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 20, 2012
    Melbourne, FL
    Photography permits are only required for commercial photography. If you don't know what commercial photography is, then you're not doing it and you don't need a permit. The ESB is private property, so they can make their own rules.

    Brooklyn Bridge Park and Fulton Ferry? Is it safe around that area at night as I may be alone?


    They are in some of the most expensive parts of Brooklyn and very safe. The thing about NYC is that depending on where someone is from, they may not be able to tell a sketchy area from a safe one. Although it's very safe compared to 40 years ago, for many people it all looks like a dirty, dangerous place. I lived in the city for 60 years and never had a problem, but I knew where not to go and developed the senses for where to be careful. The down side to this is that other cities with bad neighborhoods usually don't look bad to me.
     
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  7. Etude

    Etude Long Exposure Addict

    202
    Jun 24, 2013
    Thanks to all for the information. Your kind inputs greatly help me to plan my trip and know what to expect. :)

    Paul, I am quite surprised about your tripod issue at TOTR. I done some research and found out people used tabletop tripod without any issues.

    To be on the safe side, I guess I will bring both the tabletop tripod and my clamp.
     
  8. arch stanton

    arch stanton Mu-43 Veteran

    411
    Feb 25, 2012
    London
    Malc
    At TOTR there's a small floor above the floor with all the glass windows - that's where I was perched with my tabletop on a stone plinth...froze my hands, but *fantastic* views! Also no glass in the way...but if you shoot wide you'll have the observation deck in shot.
     
  9. arch stanton

    arch stanton Mu-43 Veteran

    411
    Feb 25, 2012
    London
    Malc
    As a follow-up, any suggestions for where to go the 3rd time you're in New York?

    I've been to most "must see" places:
    TOTR / ESB / Central Park / Bridges / Dumbo / Highline / Times Sq / Gd Central / The Met

    Not to say I won't go back to them - bloody love it here!
     
  10. bassman

    bassman Mu-43 Top Veteran

    678
    Apr 22, 2013
    New Jersey
    Scott
    Arch:

    Great museums - depending on your interests. MoMA, Met Museum of Art, Guggenheim, ICP and hundreds of smaller ones.

    Don't forget that museum of photography gear - B&H. They even have a gift shop.
     
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  11. b_rubenstein

    b_rubenstein Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 20, 2012
    Melbourne, FL
    There's more to NYC than Manhattan. There's even more to Manhattan than the usual tourist sites. If any of your family immigrated to the US, there's a good chance they entered US at Ellis Island. You can take a ferry ride there see the museum and take pictures of the Statue of Liberty and the surrounding ares of upper NY Bay. From the ferry terminal you can walk through the Financial District (Wall St.), City Hall, China Town, Little Italy through to the Lower East Side where many immigrants first lived. These areas haven't become completely gentrified yet and still have a feel of what NY was like in the early 20th century.

    The NYC subway system has a number of elevated lines in Brooklyn, Queens and the Bronx. It's an easy, cheap way to see what the rest of NY looks like, and see iconic places like Yankee Stadium and Coney Island.

    My two favorite blogs/sites about NY are: http://forgotten-ny.com/ and http://www.scoutingny.com/
     
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  12. agentlossing

    agentlossing Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jun 26, 2013
    Andrew Lossing
    One thing I learned from a trip to NYC is that there's so much culture there, you'd better experience it instead of trying to just photograph it. Sure, there's lots that begs to be photographed, but doing a lot of that runs the risk of keeping you an outsider. Soak it in, use all your senses, take your time, and photograph only infrequently. There's a lot to that city, and it doesn't all fit in a viewfinder.

    Sent from my Nexus 6 using Mu-43 mobile app
     
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