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video shake removal

Discussion in 'Video Post-Production' started by RobWatson, Feb 27, 2012.

  1. RobWatson

    RobWatson Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Pretty limited in my experience at video editing so any help would be nice ...

    Shot some hand held vid and got the shakes so I'm looking for a way in post to eliminate or minimize the shakes.

    Thanks

    180MB in size

    http://min.us/mFX1xxeYi
     
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  2. nrowensby

    nrowensby Mu-43 Regular

    89
    Jan 25, 2012
    Columbia, SC
    Subscribed
     
  3. lenshoarder

    lenshoarder Mu-43 All-Pro

    Nov 7, 2010
  4. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    What you want to do is called "Motion Tracking" (or Stabilize Motion is the feature in After Effects, as motion tracking can be used for other animation tasks as well), which tracks your target and keeps it still by cropping the excess frame to keep your target in place without jitter.

    Adobe After Effects can accomplish this. I don't know what software you have available to you.
     
  5. bryan

    bryan Mu-43 Regular

    34
    Feb 27, 2012
    If you have access to iMovie '09 or newer (Mac OS X), you can use it to stabilize your movie clips. Select the clip and click on File -> Analyze for Stabilization, and after you've added the clip to a project, playback should be smoother. You can fine tune the stabilization parameters under the Clip Adjustments menu in the project.
     
  6. lenshoarder

    lenshoarder Mu-43 All-Pro

    Nov 7, 2010
    Actually, it's not called "motion tracking". Motion tracking is, as the name suggest, tracking the motion of an object. That track can then have an effect applied to it. That effect can be a variety of things. An avatar, a blur or the center point of a frame. Thus you can use it to do shake/vibration reduction by having the frame follow the track. It's a method to do shake/vibration reduction, but shake/vibration reduction is not "motion tracking".
     
  7. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    Actually, Motion Tracking is used to accomplish different tasks. If you look in the After Effects tracker panel for instance, it gives you two options of "Track Motion" and "Stabilize Motion". The Track Motion option does what you describe with the effect, while the Stabilize Motion option does what the OP is asking for reducing jitter.

    However, BOTH those options are a form of motion tracking, and they use the same technique to accomplish two different goals. After Effects has named these functions to differentiate the end-results, but they both use the same technique to achieve that result.

    These techniques existed before they were automated into software effects.
     
  8. lenshoarder

    lenshoarder Mu-43 All-Pro

    Nov 7, 2010
    Yes, "motion tracking" is a technique to accomplish shake/vibration reduction. I said that. But "motion tracking" is not shake/vibration reduction. So it's not called that. Motion tracking is a method to accomplish a variety of things, not just one specific thing. There are a variety of ways to accomplish shake/vibration reduction.
     
  9. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    Dude... you are contradicting yourself. Are you that intent on saying I'm wrong? You said that this technique is called motion tracking, but then you say that a specific use of that same technique can no longer be called motion tracking. How does that make sense? A motion tracker can be used as a motion stabilizer but can also be used as something else because it is the "parent". A motion stabilizer is a type of motion tracker because it is the "child". That's how a "hierarchy" works... but what does that matter?

    I used the GENERIC name for the TECHNIQUE, because I don't know what software the OP possesses! Like in the example of After Effects I gave, they have two features named Track Motion and Stabilize Motion. They are BOTH motion trackers with two different goals. If I were to tell the OP that all he needs to do is "stabilize motion" he'd slap me and say, "Yeah, I know that! So how do I do it?" The simple answer is, "find some software that is capable of motion tracking".

    Why don't we just find out what software the OP has, then we can direct him to what feature (of whatever name they use!) that particular software has as a motion tracker to stabilize jitter? Isn't that easier and more productive than arguing over senseless nonsense like what the technique is called? Seriously, I thought we were here to help people out with their questions, not to fight amongst ourselves over semantics.
     
  10. SZRimaging

    SZRimaging Mu-43 Regular

    124
    Nov 16, 2011
    I second this one. I use it a lot. The plugin you are looking for is called "Deshaker". Not only does it help stabilize, but it also has options for reducing rolling shutter. I usually run this on any hand held video before importing it into my NLE of choice (Lightworks Beta at the moment) or doing the first round of color correction in Photoshop.
     
  11. RobWatson

    RobWatson Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Win7 64 bit ... I got the 32 bit versions of the SW below as per recc.
    got this Deshaker - video stabilizer
    and this VirtualDub download (at SourceForge) - virtualdub.org
    and saw this [ame=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eEF2FUUnEr4]Video Shake Removal from a Digital Camera. - YouTube[/ame]

    Looks just about right. Now if I can just figure out how to make it work ... first couple of attempts don't seem to do anything.
     
  12. kevinparis

    kevinparis Cantankerous Scotsman

    Feb 12, 2010
    Gent, Belgium
    motion tracking is the analysis of a point or set of points of high contrast/colour difference within an already recorded moving image, and recording that motion information as a set of x/y coordinates


    that motion tracking information can be used in a variety of ways

    1) Image stabilisation by effectively rotating and scaling the image to fill the frame - this is different for in-camera stabilisation that tries to compensate for the movement mechanically before the image is actually captured. Results of motion capture based image stabilisation can be effective.. but in my experience are highly processor intensive and often introduce odd artefacts

    2) pinning an alternative image to an area of a moving image...ie a poster on a building in a panned shot

    3) capturing natural movements of human subjects in order to apply that information to 3D models.... google andy serkis


    All of this requires pretty damn serious computing power...

    K
     
  13. speedandstyle

    speedandstyle Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Rather than get into what to do with your already shaky video as there have been some good suggestions already , I will help with how to avoid it in the first place.

    To avoid camera shake there are several things that will help. First make sure there is plenty of light. When you try shooting in low light the camera has to use a slower shutter speed and that will result in more shake. Second use the anti-vibration ability of your camera{if it has it}. Third mount the camera!

    In movie production a camera is NEVER hand held. They do make mobile rigs but the camera is ALWAYS mounted. The best option is a tripod but that does lock the camera's position , although you can pan and tilt and zoom{if a zoom lens}. Get a good fluid head if you want to pan and tilt.

    Then there are mobile mounts. The first is the most simple , a monopod. Mounting a camera onto a monopod allows you to use it like a tripod and you can pan easy and tilt to a degree. You can also move around with it and it is far more stable than just hand holding.

    The next step up is a stabilizer rig. You can get fairly inexpensive ones that work well if you camera isn't too heavy. I have one of the Manfrotto Modo Steady rigs and it works good for lighter cameras{up to 1.5lbs}. I have used their Fig Rig too and it works great. I have also used a full on SteadiCam and they are super but they better be for the price.
     
  14. lenshoarder

    lenshoarder Mu-43 All-Pro

    Nov 7, 2010
    I looked at your video and vdub/deshaker should do well for it. It computes a motion vector and reduces the shake using that. Your video doesn't have a lot of motion and thus that method should work well. Where deshaker fails is if there is a lot of panning about, especially rapidly, then it doesn't work as well.
     
  15. RobWatson

    RobWatson Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Got something with less 'shakes' but seems the framerate is much different ... got some fiddling to do now.
     
  16. lenshoarder

    lenshoarder Mu-43 All-Pro

    Nov 7, 2010
    I'm not contradicting myself at all. This is what you said 'What you want to do is called "Motion Tracking"'. What he wants to do is not called "Motion Tracking". Motion tracking is just one of the techniques to achieve what he wants to do. What he wants to do is called shake/vibration reduction. There are multiple techniques to do that. There's motion tracking, there's motion vectors, there are vector maps, there is FFT peaking, etc, etc. So what you are saying is like saying that applying paint to a canvas is called "brushing". What about about using a roller? What about using a spray can? Using a brush to paint with is one technique to apply paint. Painting is not called "brushing". Using "motion tracking" to reduce shake in a video is one technique to do that. Shake/vibration reduction is not called "motion tracking".

    So you did not use the "GENERIC name for the TECHNIQUE". You named one technique, among many, to accomplish shake/vibration reduction.
     
  17. kevinparis

    kevinparis Cantankerous Scotsman

    Feb 12, 2010
    Gent, Belgium
    chill out lenshoarder...and ned for that matter... lets try and solve the OP's problem

    K
     
  18. RobWatson

    RobWatson Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Also, took a little 187 MB file and bloated it up to 3.6GB! Not pretty.
     
  19. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    And so naming one of those techniques as a good method makes me wrong? I never once said that was the ONLY way that one could reduce vibration, and I don't know where you got that idea or why you're getting so worked up. :rolleyes:

    What you're doing does not help answer the question one bit, and is only causing a big ruckus over nothing which could only serve to confuse people and nothing more. We do not need the "semantics police" because failing to live up to your expectations of how things should be said is not a crime. So please just leave it alone.
     
  20. lenshoarder

    lenshoarder Mu-43 All-Pro

    Nov 7, 2010
    I'm causing the ruckus? What are you doing then? And who's worked up here? I've been keeping to the discussion of the topic. You've been trying to make it personal. Just like you have with this message.

    If you want to leave it alone, then leave it alone. Take your own advice.
     
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