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Video Question

Discussion in 'Panasonic Cameras' started by DavidC, Nov 14, 2014.

  1. DavidC

    DavidC Mu-43 Rookie

    14
    Sep 15, 2014
    I have a nephew (in-law) who is looking to produce video.

    This is a 2 part question:

    1. What camera and lens do you recommend for shooting video? What should he avoid?

    2. Is anyone using the new Panasonic LX-100 for 4k video? How do you rate it against other cameras recommended in question1?
     
  2. DaveEP

    DaveEP Mu-43 Top Veteran

    683
    Sep 20, 2014
    York, UK
    That's such an open question.

    Shooting video of what? One camera and one lens to rule them all? It doesn't exist! Even with the GH4 I've got 5 lenses in my bag!
     
  3. tosvus

    tosvus Mu-43 Top Veteran

    632
    Jan 4, 2014
    I think you need to figure out budget and what focal lengths are usable. If 24-75 equivalent is enough and he either does not shoot audio at the same time, or he uses a recorder and syncs in post, the LX100 is a fantastic deal in terms of price vs picture quality. This is said with the caveat that he either plans to distribute 4k or always will be ok downsampling from 4k to 1080p. There are better native 1080p shooters, but that mostly comes in handy when shooting higher speed like 60fps or faster.

    4k downsampled looks incredible (better than most 1080p native cams)
     
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  4. DavidC

    DavidC Mu-43 Rookie

    14
    Sep 15, 2014
    So, if it is to open ended then what lenses do you avoid because they don't focus smoothly or are inadequate for video.

    I don't know enough about Panasonic bodies to know which ones to rent and test. Is a used GH4 a good video body or is a GX7 better? Again what should he avoided?

    I certainly realize there isn't one to rule them all. I am interested in what gear you use, even if you list 5 lenses. What you like about them would be a bonus.
     
  5. Vesku

    Vesku Mu-43 Regular

    84
    Sep 23, 2014
    Fin
    To avoid: There are certain Panasonic POWER OIS lenses which has jitter problems in handheld video shooting. The worst are 35-100mm f2.8 and 14-140mm v2.
     
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  6. kevinparis

    kevinparis Cantankerous Scotsman

    Feb 12, 2010
    Gent, Belgium
    define more clearly what kind of video he wants to 'produce' , his experience in film making and what kind of budget we are looking at, and maybe we can offer some useful advice

    in making a successful video, the camera can be very small part of the equation in some situations

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9VS3C183G8g&list=PL7ECB90D96DF59DE5&spfreload=10


    producing video at a basic fundamental level has very little to do with the camera or the lens,

    Without the ability to plan a story, frame shots, edit footage, handle audio etc, the camera is not the solution.

    that said if you have a nephew who wants to get into making videos then my shopping list would be

    1) a used GH2

    2) cheap kit zoom

    3) adapter and legacy 50/1.4

    4) Tripod and fluid head

    5) external audio recorder

    6) a decent microphone

    7) some lights/reflectors

    8) some friends to help

    9) a decent computer with lots of external storage

    10) some sort of editing program and the ability to use it


    Video done to any degree of competency is complex!!!

    K
     
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  7. DavidC

    DavidC Mu-43 Rookie

    14
    Sep 15, 2014
    Yeah I'm sorry I can't define it much better. However, your response and list was an awesome response, obviously from someone who has experience in this area. I don't have any experience.

    I have pointed him toward this thread to watch, and if he emails me better details I will certainly post them up.

    Even the few posts so far have been helpful. It is much appreciated.
     
  8. Bif

    Bif Mu-43 Veteran

    380
    May 28, 2012
    San Angelo TX
    Bruce Foreman
    If he feels he will likely "grow" into video, the GH4 would be the best choice. If budget is a consideration, a used GH3 (still does outstanding 1080p!) will be a good choice for "testing the waters".

    Olympus camera's video is quite limited as current models only have one main frame rate, 30p. Olympus seems to feel that's the only frame rate needed worldwide although there are some indications future models may include more flexible options. The GH4, though, is a "world" camera offering both PAL and NTSC frame rates as well as true 24p.

    A good "starter" lens might be the Lumix 14-42mm "kit" lens (version 2) or a lightly used Lumix 14-45mm "kit" lens. Either provides a "workhorse" wide angle to portrait perspective short telephoto range that covers a lot of situations. "Lens snobs" put it down a lot but is is actually quite a bit better than most give it credit for, and it's fine in daylight or fairly well lit interiors and fairly well lit night street scenes at the wide position where max aperture is f3.5.

    For low light work either the Lumix 20mm f1.7 (pancake) or the Oly 25mm f1.8 will be quite useful. For other lenses the "kit" lens will give him some idea of what he needs to add, but he would be best off learning with that "kit" lens.

    The built in mics will usually be "disappointing" as will be an on camera mounted external mic. Both Tascam and Zoom offer fairly inexpensive audio recorders with their own built in mics and with inputs external mics can be connected to. I often mount one on a light stand and place it close to the "talent" but just out of the frame, and "synch" dialog in post. But he should take it "piecemeal" and add stuff like that as needed as he learns.

    A fairly sturdy tripod with fluid head is a must.

    Just some suggestions for starters.
     
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