Video Newbie Needs Advice for Wedding - Equipment

Discussion in 'Filmmaking' started by Offriver, Aug 14, 2011.

  1. Offriver

    Offriver Mu-43 Regular

    May 17, 2011
    Hi - I'm not new to photography, but am new to video. My friends want me to shoot some video at their wedding. They can't afford a videographer and know that I don't have any experience w/ video. They simply want "any video that I can capture" from their wedding. Sounds easy and I agreed to do it and am not being paid.

    So, I am starting to think about what equipment I'll need/want to use so that I can start practicing. The wedding is in 2 months. I need some advice on what to use or if I need to buy anything to help capture the moments. The wedding will be indoors. I'd appreciate any help first on equipment and then I'll ask about settings & technique in a followup post later.

    Here's what I have: Olympus E-PL2, Olympus 14-54mm II 4/3 lens w/ MA1 adapter, Panasonic 100-300mm lens, & a tripod.

    I'm willing to spend a 4-5 hundred dollars on anything to make the job better/easier as I can always resell the equipment if I decide that I don't want to keep it. I want to do a good job on this project even though my friends are just desperate for any type of video clips that I can capture.

    Questions - Will these lenses work? Will changing lenses be a pain? I haven't seen the venue, so not sure how much zoom (or light) that I'll need. Would a one-lens superzoom be better - like the 14-150 or 14-140? Should I be using a camcorder instead? What about the panasonic G3 body - I like the rotating screen and touch point autofocus. How much memory will I need? AVCHD format seems cumbersome - would it be ok to shoot in MPEG?

    Help! What would you do if you were me?

  2. peterpix

    peterpix Mu-43 Veteran

    Feb 8, 2010
    So. Maine
    Real Name:
    Peter Randal
    Wedding shoot

    My first thought is to get the 20mm 1.7. Ambient light may or may not be adequate for those lenses with small max apertures. The 20 at f 2 or so will give small depth of field and blur what usually are busy backgrounds.
  3. kevinparis

    kevinparis Cantankerous Scotsman

    Feb 12, 2010
    Gent, Belgium
    My first thought would have been to say no and go and enjoy the wedding instead !!!!

    Never shot a wedding....but things that come to mind that you will have to consider

    1) Keeping the camera steady.... holding a telephoto lens at arms lenght while videoing is going to be very seasick inducing. Consider shorter wider lenses and getting closer or looking at ways of supporting the camera like a tripod or monopod

    2) Switching as many auto things off as possible... nothing is more frustrating than the camera changing the exposure, WB, ISO or focus when it thinks its appropriate.

    3) Sound.... the on-board mic will pick up sound from everywhere - most of it will be useless

    4) Editing.... a whole new area to learn... how long a shot should be, what kind of story you want to tell, what music to use

    Go shoot a couple of social occasions... even if it is just with your friends in a bar or restaurant and see if you can work out what shots to take and how to string them together.

    Video ain't easy and its almost nothing like photography

    just my opion