UV Protection Filter?

Discussion in 'Open Discussion' started by timothysoong, Dec 2, 2011.

  1. timothysoong

    timothysoong Mu-43 Veteran

    217
    Aug 10, 2011
    Taipei, Taiwan
    Couldn't find a section for this, so thought I'd post it here.

    Anyways, I think these protection filter is a MUST have for all lenses for protecting the lens.

    And, as far as I know and heard from the salesgirl who sold me a lens is that there are two kinds of UV Protection Filter. One does reflect light, the other doesn't.

    That's all I know. And I've got the Rowa Multi-Coated UV Protection Filter on both my 14mm and 14-45mm lenses. But I got them as I purchased the lenses. And now I'm about to order a Oly 45mm f/1.8 online. So they'd not come with these protection filters. I'd want to know what are the differences between these UV Protection Filters and how to tell which is which? And also which are the most recommended(as in the best in quality) UV Protection Filter?

    Thanks,
    Tim
     
  2. winx14

    winx14 Mu-43 Regular

    80
    Dec 1, 2010
    Brooklyn, NY
    I used to use Tiffen UV filters. I got one for my 20mm (now 25mm) and the flare was SO BAD. Bought Hoya HMC and there was a lot less flare.
     
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  3. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    B+W and Heliopan are some of the best. Hoya is good and still inexpensive. That would be my starting point for minimum quality. I often use Kenko Pro-1, which has the exact same glass and build as Hoya Pro-1 but is re-branded and usually cheaper.

    I've never liked the Tiffen filters... nor the Canon filters which are normally made by Tiffen. Never cheap out on filters... it's just not worth it.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. ~tc~

    ~tc~ Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Oct 22, 2010
    Houston, TX
    There are a gazillion "should I use a filter" threads ...

    For every person that says a filter saved their lens, there is 1 who says it actually damaged the lens, or caused pictures to be trashed.

    If you decide you need a filter, it's got to be from a respectable name brand and fully multi-coated.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  5. timothysoong

    timothysoong Mu-43 Veteran

    217
    Aug 10, 2011
    Taipei, Taiwan
    Only the B+W and the Hoya are available in my country. But the B+W is too expensive imo. And I found the Hoya one, not sure if its the Hoya "Pro-1" that you're mentioning. Mind helping me see if its the one your mentioning. Here's a link to the site:
    數ä½å°å…” HOYA HMC 37mm SLIM UVé¡ ä¿è­·é¡ E-P1 E-P2 E-P3 E-PMl Olympus 17mm F2.8 14-42mm F3.5-5.6 UV 數ä½å°å…”æ”影器æ批發零售 Yahoo! 奇摩æ‹è³£

    Scroll down for the pictures.

    Thanks =)
     
  6. ~tc~

    ~tc~ Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Oct 22, 2010
    Houston, TX
    From the pictures, that appears to be part of their general line. The coatings only allow for 97% light transmission (where the higher lines are 99.7% due to better coatings).

    Either spend big, or go without IMHO.
     
  7. Luke

    Luke Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jul 30, 2010
    Milwaukee, WI
    Luke
    I have used the several different Hoya brand filters and always been satisfied. I have never felt that they negatively affected the outcome.
     
  8. timothysoong

    timothysoong Mu-43 Veteran

    217
    Aug 10, 2011
    Taipei, Taiwan
    Since I couldn't find the Hoya/Kenko Pro1D available for my lens diameter(37mm), Oly 45mm f/1.8. Nor could I find them online.

    I have no choice but to go with B+W I guess. However there are two kinds of UV Protection Filter. Both are multi-coating. But one has a silver frame. Does it make any difference in quality or performance?
     
  9. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    I'm not sure about the quality of the silver one but I'm sure it would look good on your m.Zuiko 45mm, which I assume is also silver. ;)

    That's not your only choice though. You can always get a 37mm-to-42mm or to 46mm or 49mm, and greatly open up your options for filters and hoods. That will only cost you another $15 or so, and will make your lens more versatile.
     
  10. Canonista

    Canonista Mu-43 Top Veteran

    563
    Sep 3, 2011
    L.A.
    Beware fake filters!

    Make sure to buy from an authorized B&W or Hoya dealer. There are quite a few counterfeit filters out there, so be particularly careful of online sellers on eBay and other auction sites. If the price is too good to believe, it's probably fake.

    How to tell the difference between real and fake B+W filters! « Camera Obscura

    Some info about fake Hoya Filters

    I've used Hoya filters for many years, and while the quality of glass is very good, the coating can be hard to clean, and the aluminum ring can easily deform if dropped (which I did with a very expensive 77mm polarizer). I now only use B&W MRC filters which use a brass ring (although I understand some sold in Asia are also available in aluminum).
     
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  11. nickthetasmaniac

    nickthetasmaniac Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 11, 2011
    Saying that a protection filter is a must and then quoting a salesgirl is not a good sign... Some people like using protection filters, some don't, but they are in no way a *must* - despite the fact that salespeople seem to love pushing them onto customers that may not know any better...

    That said, I'm with ~tc~ on this - either pay for quality or don't bother. Cheap filters can do nasty things to image quality.
     
  12. darrenleow

    darrenleow Mu-43 Regular

    89
    Sep 30, 2011
    Singapore
    i noticed that ghosting of bright point light sources due to the uv filter is a much more serious problem on my EP2 than on my DSLRs, possibly because of the more direct light path to the sensor on mirrorless systems. I use a Hoya HMC for my 20mm and a marumi DHG MC for my oly 45mm (pretty reputable, couldn't find anything else in that size) and they ghost really terribly that I'm considering giving up on uv filters altogether.
     
  13. timothysoong

    timothysoong Mu-43 Veteran

    217
    Aug 10, 2011
    Taipei, Taiwan
    And if I may ask, I found two kinds of clear protection filters one is UV the other is the protector? Which one should I get? What does the UV one do?

    And if I am planning to go with the B+W, there are so many kinds of filter they have, not sure which one to get is a clear one. =\ Mind providing me specific models name?
     
  14. timothysoong

    timothysoong Mu-43 Veteran

    217
    Aug 10, 2011
    Taipei, Taiwan
    Does these converter rings make any difference in quality and performance with brands? Or you'd say get a cheap one would do?
     
  15. Canonista

    Canonista Mu-43 Top Veteran

    563
    Sep 3, 2011
    L.A.
    They are essentially synonymous in use. Clear = protection = UV.

    Before you buy any filters, you should really read these articles first:
    http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/camera-lens-filters.htm
    http://bythom.com/filters.htm

    If you really want a useful filter that can really make a difference in your images, check out the polarizer.

    If you still want a B&W UV filter, get the MRC (multicoated): http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/11985-REG/B_W_66030559_46mm_UV_Haze_010.html
     
  16. keith1200rs

    keith1200rs Mu-43 Regular

    76
    Nov 8, 2011
    North Yorkshire
    What is the more direct light path on mirrorless? While actually taking the picture the mirror is flipped out of the way and the light path is identical for a DSLR and M43 i.e. Straight.

    Keith
     
  17. granlaw

    granlaw Mu-43 Rookie

    24
    Nov 13, 2011
    I'm in the don't use one camp. I think if you are going to use one it needs to be the best you can afford.
    Ive got 3 Canon lenses that basically lived on bodies shooting weddings over the last 5-6 years and as you may imagine they didn't get an easy time, however the glass is absolutely spotless and none of them had filters for protection. All of them were used with lens hoods and thats probably why they are pretty much as new. The lens hoods on the other hand are really scratched and obviously been abused :)
     
  18. darrenleow

    darrenleow Mu-43 Regular

    89
    Sep 30, 2011
    Singapore
    I should have phrased it as the "shorter" light path, since the distance from the UV filter to the sensor with a fast, compact prime on M4/3 is much shorter than the same distance with a big zoom lens on DSLR. Possibly makes the reflection off the inner surface of the UV filter more likely to reflect directly onto the sensor.
     
  19. timothysoong

    timothysoong Mu-43 Veteran

    217
    Aug 10, 2011
    Taipei, Taiwan
    But if you go to:
    HOYA FILTERS - The Difference is Clear

    You can see the Protector and UV are two different filters. :\
     
  20. fredlong

    fredlong Just this guy...

    Apr 18, 2011
    Massachusetts USA
    Fred
    When I worked in a camera store back in the 80's I was expected to sell a UV filter with every camera/lens or lens sale. The mark-up on a camera or lens was only about $10, Filters and other accessories were marked up 50-100% and were where we actually made money.

    I used them until I learned that a hood would protect as well as a filter in most cases and not "get in the way" of the picture. It turns out I've never needed a filter or a hood to "protect" my lens, but hoods have reduced flare on numerous occasions.