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Using strobe on OMD and having exposure issue

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by m43dex, Oct 10, 2012.

  1. m43dex

    m43dex Mu-43 Veteran

    242
    Mar 5, 2011
    Michigan
    I setup my OMD to take some pics of the wife with my Alien Bee b400. I switched camera to manual mode and got a reading from my light meter. I positioned the manual settings per the light meter and i was ready to shot. Look through the EVF and the exposure says -3.0ev. I try to change exposure back to 0.0 but I can't find a way to do so... Am I missing something... Checked all settings and menu but do not see how to adjust... Any thoughts ....?
     
  2. flash

    flash Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Apr 29, 2010
    1 hour from Sydney Australia.
    Gordon
    It's reading the ambient light. You're using flash. Just ignore it.

    Gordon
     
  3. m43dex

    m43dex Mu-43 Veteran

    242
    Mar 5, 2011
    Michigan
    So are you saying setting the exposure is disabled when in manual mode?
     
  4. alans

    alans Mu-43 Veteran

    340
    Feb 28, 2010
    The exposure is not disabled. In M the camera will fire at whatever settings you apply to the camera, whether it's on or not.

    How are you setting the exposure for your Bee? That is the exposure you need to be concerned about. Are you using a flash meter?
     
  5. m43dex

    m43dex Mu-43 Veteran

    242
    Mar 5, 2011
    Michigan
    Yes... I am using a light meter to get A and S settings. The Bee does not have exposure settings. The strobe only has strength settings 1/8 - full power. Exposure does not appear to be a setting that you can change or apply to the camera.
     
  6. Mikefellh

    Mikefellh Mu-43 Top Veteran

    939
    Jun 7, 2012
    Toronto, Canada
    When the camera is in Manual mode, the Exposure Compensation indicators become your light meter. When it sas -3.0, it's telling you the exposure setting is three stops below what the camera thinks is a proper exposure. If this number is flashing, then it's below -3 stops.

    In Manual mode YOU are fully controlling the shutter and aperture, so there's no way to do exposure compensation since the camera isn't controlling any of the exposure settings.
     
  7. m43dex

    m43dex Mu-43 Veteran

    242
    Mar 5, 2011
    Michigan
    ok... I guess that makes sense. So -3.0 is the light meter prior to my shot and the strobe flash. So as long at my light meter settings are accurate I should be fine.
     
  8. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    Exactly. When using strobes or strong enough speedlights (with manual power) you always need a negative compensation setting, whether shooting in Manual mode, Aperture Priority, or Shutter Priority.

    Why not just take a photo first before questioning it? You'd have found out then that your exposure settings were correct. ;)
     
  9. Mikefellh

    Mikefellh Mu-43 Top Veteran

    939
    Jun 7, 2012
    Toronto, Canada
    To learn how this works, in Manual mode adjust the shutter/aperture until it reads 0.0 and take a picture without the flash.
     
  10. flash

    flash Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Apr 29, 2010
    1 hour from Sydney Australia.
    Gordon
    No. I'm saying that the cameras meter only measures the light falling on the sensor. It has no way of measurring the output of a flash before (or actually during and after) it fires.

    Twenty second flash primer.......

    Your camera has three ways of adjusting exposure. Shutter speed, aperture and ISO. Your studio flash has a flash duration of between 1/400 and 1/40000 of a second. All of these speeds are well above the flash sync speed of your camera. Therefore the shutter speed you set will NOT affect the amount of FLASH light reaching the sensor. Changing the aperture or ISO WILL affect the flash exposure. So since your camera meter gives an exposure value based on three perameters and your flash exposure is only based on two, the internal meter has no purpose in calculating a flash based exposure.

    As your flash meter (in flash mode) reads only two parameters (aperture and ISO)it can read the output of your flash. It will be giving you an arbitrary shutter speed based on the maximum sync speed you have access to.

    However shutter speed will have an influence on any residual ambient light in the setting you are shooting in. SO you can use the shutter speed to make areas that are out of range of the flash lighter or darker based on the shutter speed you select.

    Get this book: Light: Science and Magic. It will help, a lot. There's a kindle version as well.

    Gordon
     
  11. TheCreativeD00m

    TheCreativeD00m Mu-43 Regular

    94
    Jul 9, 2012
    Fort Worth, Tx
    Did you try to take a picture then look at the histogram? Of course it will be negative, you set your exposure for the strobe not the ambient light.
     
  12. m43dex

    m43dex Mu-43 Veteran

    242
    Mar 5, 2011
    Michigan
    Thx for input guys.. I will give it another try tomorrow.