Using ND filters on primes

Discussion in 'Native Lenses' started by Petrus61, May 17, 2013.

  1. Petrus61

    Petrus61 Mu-43 Regular

    49
    Oct 22, 2012
    London
    Hi All,

    Trying to learn - I have an OMD and the following native primes ( 25,45,60,75) which I really like. When using the 75 in bright sunlight I tend to max out or get very close to 4000 shutter speed - when using a variable ND filter will the camera automatically compensate to how much I vary the filter?

    If I put a 10 stop presumably I can get long exposures....?

    sorry novice with ND but I think I need them on these primes allowing shallow DOF in bright sunlight. - thanks for your help
     
  2. Wizard Steve

    Wizard Steve Mu-43 Regular

    128
    Feb 10, 2013
    Provence, France
    David Ricketts
    All the ND filter will do is reduce the light coming into the camera. The camera has no idea that you're using a filter and doesn't need to know. It will just look at the available light and set the exposure accordingly. You don't need to do anything special.

    A 10 stop filter cuts down the light by a factor of 1000. You probably won't be able to see anything in the viewfinder so it would be best to line up your shot, on a tripod, and then add the filter and take your shot.

    If you're walking around taking hand-held shots, you'd be better off with something less aggressive.
     
  3. iGonzoid

    iGonzoid Mu-43 Veteran

    247
    Feb 6, 2011
    Tasmania, Australia
    I was advised to use a 4x on my Nokton f0.95 25mm; but went a bit further with a 6x ND. Works a charm if you want to use wide appertures. I agree that 10x sounds like overkill, and hard to focus, as pointed out. 6x is manageable.
     
  4. nickthetasmaniac

    nickthetasmaniac Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 11, 2011
    I use a 3-stop ND on my Nokton 25mm and haven't maxed it out in daylight
     
  5. laser8

    laser8 Mu-43 Veteran

    403
    Jan 29, 2013
    Mare nostrum, Istria
    Same thing here on a PL 25 and 3 stop.
     
  6. Wizard Steve

    Wizard Steve Mu-43 Regular

    128
    Feb 10, 2013
    Provence, France
    David Ricketts
    For the record, mine too is a 3-stop.
     
  7. F/Stop

    F/Stop Mu-43 Veteran

    451
    Mar 9, 2013
    West Virginia
    Brian Y.
    Went out yesterday and shot directly into the sun with the 17 and a 3 stop. It was cutting it close especially with long exposure daytime shots (moving water)I think I will purchase a 6 stop in the future for good measure
     
  8. edwardconde

    edwardconde Mu-43 All-Pro

    Nov 8, 2012
    Los Angeles, CA
    What brands do you all recommend? I'd like to get some for my Sigma Twins & my Oly 45...

    thx
     
  9. davidzvi

    davidzvi Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 12, 2012
    Outside Boston MA
    David
    A good polarizer will work as a 2-stop ND as well.
     
  10. twokatmew

    twokatmew Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 1, 2012
    Lansing, MI, US
    Margaret
    I like Marumi, though I have a couple Hoya filters, and I will likely add one from B+W in the future. Just make sure you buy the multi-coated filters to avoid unnecessarily degrading your images.

    Marumi makes DHG and Super DHG (digital high grade) filters. I own a couple Super DHG, and they're very good. Much less expensive than other top brands and excellent quality. :smile: You can find Marumi filters on Ebay, Amazon and at 2filter.com.
     
  11. albert_ang

    albert_ang Mu-43 Regular

    26
    Jun 5, 2012
    Melbourne, Australia
    Yes and yes. I have the vari-ND filter. If you use variable nd, at close to the extreme stop (eg. > 7 stop in my lightcraft vari-nd), the quality degrades drastically and often you can see the infamous X pattern problem.

    So for 10 stop, use the dedicated nd filter instead.
     
  12. dwig

    dwig Mu-43 Top Veteran

    623
    Jun 26, 2010
    Key West FL
    Don't confuse "factors" (e.g. 2x, 4x, ...) with stops. The OP refers to a 10 stop filter. Such a filter would have an exposure factor of 1024x. An exposure factor of 10x is approximately 3-2/3 stops.