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Upgraded To 14-42 II R, Now There's A 40-150 R!

Discussion in 'Native Lenses' started by SCT, Sep 10, 2011.

  1. SCT

    SCT Mu-43 Regular

    141
    Mar 8, 2011
    Landover, MD, USA
    [​IMG]
    Thanks to mxlin, I am happy after purchasing the 14-42mm II R from him he posted up for sale a few days ago. I just got it today. I haven't taken any pictures with it yet but I did a comparison between the II R and the first 14-42mm that came with my EPL1. I am very impressed! The main reason why I decided to buy the 14-42mm II R is because I want to try taking videos with the EPL1. I have a 40-150mm MSC but I just always stand more than too far than I have to and want to (apparently).

    [​IMG]
    The 14-42mm II R. Amazingly quiet. I hear the electronics inside the EPL1 more than the lense whenever it does anything. Workmanship is incredible. The first 14-42mm, sorry to say, but just feels cheap. Usually well-built things are a bit heavier than they would seem but with everything going lighter and more efficient now, keeping in mind usually cheaper things are lighter and plastic crap, the precision, the feel of the 14-42mm II R doesn't make me think it's anywhere near cheap. The focus and zoom rings are super smooth! Unlike the first 14-42mm, there's way less play in all the moving parts.

    I certainly like it. I only wanted it for its video qualities but I got more. And since I have the first 14-42mm lense, before I knew what the II R had to offer, I was like maybe this lense will be on the shelf. Now that I have played around with the II R for only less than 10 minutes, the first 14-42mm is definately going to be on the shelf. Actually, it's in its box already. I don't plan on selling it, though.

    Now on the Olympus website it lists the new 14-42mm II R for sale in both black and silver. I read the description and it says that it "ships with interchangeable decoration rings that perfectly match the colors of different PEN cameras". I'm actually wanting to go after these decor rings!
    14-42mm II R


    To make it worse, Olympus now has the 40-150mm R. Redone exterior, as far as I know for now. I *may* get the new 40-150mm R as well, there's no reason I can think of to get it yet besides the redesigned exterior which I'm sure matches that of the 14-42mm II R.
    M.ZUIKO DIGITAL ED 40-150 mm f4.0-5.6 R
    *To note, Olympus copied and pasted the "overview" from the 14-42mm II R's overview. Which is why it says 14-42mm II R even though you're on the 40-140mm R's page.
     
  2. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    Yes, the MSC lenses are wonderful!

    I wouldn't upgrade your 40-150mm, though. It's already an MSC lens so it can be updated in firmware and should then perform exactly like the R version if it doesn't already (there is no current update available for this lens - just for the 14-140mm... which probably means either the update is coming or the 40-150mm is already up to par). At any rate, even R performance (or updated MSC performance) is only noticeable on the 3rd generation bodies - your E-PL1 would gain no benefit anyways. Therefore, the only difference the R version will have is the different finish on the focus ring. I'm sure you could find a better place to spend your money than that. :D

    The difference between the original 14-42mm and the MSC versions (II and R) however, are quite substantial! Doesn't the lens feel so much more solid and smooth? Especially without that floppy front barrel, lol. The E-PL1s released in Japan only had the MSC lens... so now your E-PL1 is halfway like the Japanese version. :D
     
  3. SCT

    SCT Mu-43 Regular

    141
    Mar 8, 2011
    Landover, MD, USA
    YES! That is the main thing that made me feel that the 14-42mm was cheap, like it will easily break if I try to focus in a quick or something.

    As for the 40-150mm R, I'm more than likely not getting it. I'm still deciding if the Pana 20mm f/1.7 is worth it, a great addition to the collection of lenses I already have. I have read everything on here and elsewhere about it; not a single bad review. That'll be where my play money will go to if not a VF-2.
     
  4. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    Both would be excellent choices for a next purchase. :thumbup:
     
  5. shnitz

    shnitz Mu-43 Top Veteran

    989
    Aug 25, 2011
    Austin, TX
    I say go for the VF-2 before Panasonic 20mm, but eventually you'll want both. Really, for video, I'm no videographer (I've still never used any of my SLR's video modes), but from what I've read on various forums, MF is the way to go anyway, so try running your legacy lenses through the gauntlet and see where that gets you. A viewfinder is essential though, for video or stills.

    Also, what is that Ferrari and Motul logo, how about a full shot of whatever your Olympus is sitting on? :)
     
  6. SCT

    SCT Mu-43 Regular

    141
    Mar 8, 2011
    Landover, MD, USA
    That's just my 6 year old trusty laptop.

    I was thinking of the Vf2 over the pana or any other lense as well unless I come across certain legacy lense.

    I havent tried the video mode with the legacy lenses yet or much of that mode for all that matters. But it's there, might just well.
     
  7. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    Please do tell... which legacy lenses did you come across which have piqued your interest?

    As far as video, legacy lenses are awesome for that. They are made for manual focus, with nice smooth focus rings. The fly-by-wire focus of digital lenses were clunky and noisy, which is why they had to step up with new video optimized lenses (like the Olympus MSC lenses or the Panasonic 14-150mm). This was never a problem with legacy lenses...

    And of course, video was meant to be shot with manual focus. Anything else is just a camcorder. :D
     
  8. SCT

    SCT Mu-43 Regular

    141
    Mar 8, 2011
    Landover, MD, USA
    I'm still quite new to using legacy lenses. But there are certain traits they have that the native lenses just doesn't have or produce. I have two Vivitar legacy lenses which are great but I haven't used much. So far I've been falling more and more towards Minolta. I have two Minoltas, 50mm MD and 50mm MD Macro. The 50mm Macro is wonderful! I just recently got the 50mm non-macro so I haven't got the chance to play with that one just yet. And I got that 50mm because the 50mm Macro version is just amazing. I've been thinking of doing research about the Minolta Rokkor lenses, if they're better or not.

    Don't be surprised though if I ever show pictures of storage bins full of legacy lenses. I go to pawnshops and thrift stores now on a often basis to see what lenses they may have. If it appeals to me in some way, I'll get it. Or maybe if it just looks cool ;) Nonetheless, I want to try all legacy lenses.
     
  9. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    I love Minolta lenses. They are what I mostly shot in the film days. Unfortunately, I never kept any of my equipment from then, so I've had to start anew.

    I've been collecting a lot of legacy lenses myself lately. Too many in the 50mm range, lol. I guess I was just being picky about getting the perfect standard lens to match my small E-PL2. I ended up narrowing down my choices to four 50mm lenses in OM and AR mounts, which were all very comparable including two small pancakes, the Zuiko 50mm f/1.8 and the Konica Hexanon 40mm f/1.8, and their two larger and brighter brothers, the Zuiko 50mm f/1.4 and the Konica Hexanon f/1.4. I found the Zuikos to be warmer and the Hexanons to be cooler, but otherwise they seemed to exhibit very similar image characteristics such as contrast and resolution.

    I finally ended up choosing the Zuiko 50mm f/1.4 as my go-to lens. I really liked the colors of the Zuikos, and they were both smaller than their Konica relatives. I also like the aperture ring design on the Zuikos a lot better. I've always been fond of aperture rings on the nose of the lens rather than the base, as I find that the aperture never gets bumped and changed on the nose, while it is always being changed by mistake when near the base of the lens. Plus, the Konicas both have an AE lock, which coupled with the ease of accidental aperture changes becomes quite troublesome. One thing that's slightly odd is that the Zuikos only stop down to f/16... while my Zuiko 200mm f/4 stops all the way down to f/32! Both Konicas stop down to f/22 as expected. In the end though, probably the biggest deciding factor was the fact that the Zuiko 50mm f/1.4 was significantly the smallest of the f/1.4 lenses, and I liked their performance better than that of the 1.8 lenses. Both f/1.4 lenses seemed smoother with brighter colors than their smaller f/1.8 siblings, though the differences were barely noticeable.

    So now, I've got quite a number of great 50mm lenses that I should try to sell. Good thing I'm not married, or I'd have to sell them right away, lol (these aren't my commercial lenses, though I think some of them could be). :D

    To pair with the Zuiko 50mm f/1.4, I've added a Zuiko 200mm f/4 prime which also exhibits excellent image quality. I've been told that this lens is much less prone to CA than the 180mm/2.8. What I love about the 200mm/4 is its very slim and compact nature. Paired up with the compact Zuiko 50mm, you can pack quite a lot of sharp imaging power into a very small package.

    Somebody tried to sell me a Vivitar Series 1 200mm f/3 today. Wonderful lens, but unfortunately not one that follows my ideal of compact size. ;) The same fellow also had a Soligor 200mm f/2.8, and a Zuiko 24mm f/3.5 shift lens. Really nice lenses, but quite large (and in the case of the shift lens, expensive). I didn't have much luck with my last Soligor, but this one seemed to be of a totally different class!

    One lens I have in Minolta mount which I quite enjoy is the Kiron manufactured Vivitar 100mm f/2.8 macro, in Minolta MC. It's not a Series 1 lens, but it's a Kiron lens and that's just as good. :D I would like to try some of the Minolta Rokkor lenses.

    As far as exhibiting those "certain traits" which modern, digital lenses can't reproduce... the lens I have which does that best is the Russian Jupiter-3 in Leica M39 mount. My 1953 copy produces a certain color and tone which I've never seen in any modern lens, and does it with very good sharpness and clarity, right down to f/2 (f/1.5 is washed out with no contrast).

    Legacy lenses are so addictive...