Training videos, books, Youtube channels, etc.

DynaSport

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As I have posted elsewhere, I want to work into becoming a portrait photographer. It is becoming clear to me, that while I know a little, there is MUCH I need to learn. So, for you portrait photographers out there, what videos, books, youtube channels, etc, can you recommend as training tools. I want to learn more about everything (not so much about cameras and lenses) like posing, lighting, angles, site selection, cropping, whatever.

I have begun going through youtube, but there is a lot out there, some good I have found and some junk. How did you learn? What do you recommend? Thanks.
 

pondball

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Hi Dan... I don't really delve into Portrait photography but I have been very impressed with the other online photo courses offered at Creative Live. Right now they have over 40 courses on sale for under $29. There are many portrait courses available throughout the site including some by Lindsay Adler etc. I tend to wait until these courses are on sale but they also run live shows from time to time that are free. Might be worthwhile you getting on their mailing list so as to receive notifications of their offerings.
 

ionian

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Phlearn for photoshop and Lightroom help. It's like you know there is a 10 minute video from Phlearn that will explain anything you might want to do in post, so it gives you the freedom to try stuff out.

For studio lighting I like Joel Grimes but his style works for me, I like things simple but effective.

I think the key is inspiration. There are as many ways to take a portrait as there are people to photograph, so you're going to have to figure out your own style and niche. Spend as much time as you can looking at portraits, and those that you like you should use as inspiration. Work out the lighting, setting, processing and try to identify what makes you connect with it. If you don't have a product you believe in, you can't sell it to others. This is perhaps the most intangible but important part of the process, don't geek out too much on the tech stuff when the artistic feeling stuff is what will connect you to your clients.
 

CWRailman

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It really depends on what type of portrait work you are considering. Casual portraits, formal portraits, urban type portraits or what? However whichever you are considering the most important skill you will need is lighting and for that there are several people who are better at that than most others. The first is Damien Lovegrove. You can learn a lot by purchasing some of his tutorials. Subscribe to him on Facebook and you will get notices of when his videos are on sale. You can also find some segments of his videos on Youtube. I have been experimenting with some of his techniques and have gotten good results. Damien stresses the impact lighting has on models and the moods that can be achieved from making subtle changes to the lighting.

Secondly I would recommend strongly recommend Michael Sewell who posts to this forum. He has a weekly blog which features lighting of many subjects including portrait work.

As far as posing itself, yes there are many and some are pathetically bad and sometimes you find that one video will conflict with another. For some basic ideas check out the Blush With Me Parmita. She is a former model and now a photographer in Chicago. Here are a few. Pay attention to what she says about the models legs when they are sitting.

I found this one down with Mike Brown to be interesting.

Overall I think I have over forty youtube videos I have book marked just dealing with posing. One common thread between them all is that the photographer should direct the model and not try and pose them as directing them produces a much more natural photograph where as posing is more static or stiff looking.
 

CWRailman

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One more video on this subject that I forgot to list and think is very important is this one by Mark Wallace. I believe he has several on this subject but this one deals with the entire shoot from beginning to end and focuses less on the equipment used. He stresses and unless I am shooting one of my corporate events or parties I always do so, is to have a model release signed by the model. DO NOT FORGET THIS!! Even if I have photographed the person previously I get a model release signed for every session. You can download these from numerous WEB sites. If the person is young verify they are of legal age as defined by your location by checking picture ID otherwise you will need signed permission from their guardian. (Especially important if you are doing graduation photo's.) The form I use is short and simple but it will protect you from future disagreements.
 

Photorebel

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Jeff Mims
As I have posted elsewhere, I want to work into becoming a portrait photographer. It is becoming clear to me, that while I know a little, there is MUCH I need to learn. So, for you portrait photographers out there, what videos, books, youtube channels, etc, can you recommend as training tools. I want to learn more about everything (not so much about cameras and lenses) like posing, lighting, angles, site selection, cropping, whatever.

I have begun going through youtube, but there is a lot out there, some good I have found and some junk. How did you learn? What do you recommend? Thanks.
As I have posted elsewhere, I want to work into becoming a portrait photographer. It is becoming clear to me, that while I know a little, there is MUCH I need to learn. So, for you portrait photographers out there, what videos, books, youtube channels, etc, can you recommend as training tools. I want to learn more about everything (not so much about cameras and lenses) like posing, lighting, angles, site selection, cropping, whatever.

I have begun going through youtube, but there is a lot out there, some good I have found and some junk. How did you learn? What do you recommend? Thanks.


I recently discovered this guy. Joe Edelman
His videos aren't very long, but he is very informative. I thought I was something of a portrait photographer, but there is SO much I don't know. I'm enjoying these videos. Joe is also an Olympus user, but primarily, he seems to know about lighting and portrait photography.
 
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