Touring the Galápagos Islands

Hendrik

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Return with us now to those thrilling days of yesteryear (before Covid) when my wife and I were privileged to remove one item from our bucket list by visiting the Galápagos Islands. Spoiler alert: It was a blast! On the assumption that some here on the list might have a bit of interest but will not be able to take this trip in as favorable a time and circumstance as we managed, this is going to be a long and image-heavy photo essay –– 20 posts with eight photos each. The images will start after a description of the state of the Galapagos as we found it (this post, below), followed by a short gear debriefing (following post.)

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In essence, the Galápagos Islands are a zoological garden, or zoo, for short. The ocean is their fence. They lie far enough away from the mainland to resist being casually populated by alien species. Only those species that arrived in the islands in numbers sufficient to establish sustaining populations flourished. Some have been present (and removed from their origin species) long enough to undergo further speciation. The islands are proof against the odd vagrant that has no mate with which to procreate. Over millennia of isolation the resident species have lost any reason to fear humans. This makes the environment both fragile to human intervention and unique in offering humans close access to seemingly “tame” wild animals. Endemic animals have few natural predators on land and most act as if they have none. The Galapagos Hawk, Galapagos Owl and Great Blue Heron seem to be the prime candidates among non-introduced species, but, between their modest mass and gullet size, present little danger to most adult land fauna. Still, all animals have to eat and not all of them are herbivores. The sea, close to hand, no doubt provides drama in abundance.

The greatest danger to all the endemic species, both flora and fauna, is presented by human activity, especially from human-introduced companion species. Goats and pigs deplete the grazing potential for the native species. Rats, cats and dogs add a threat of predation where none had existed before. The list is much longer. In fact, introduced species outnumber native in about the ratio of 8 to 5. And there have been extinctions.

Lonesome George in taxidermy. He was the last surviving male Pinta Island tortoise.
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In response, the Ecuadorian government has restricted access to the islands. Other than through birth, adoption or marriage, emigration to the Galápagos is not allowed. The land area allotted to human use is restricted to 3% of the total. The laws concerning endemic species are strict and the punishments are stiff. These regulations, backed by meaningful fines, apply both to residents and visitors. This very conservative policy is continued in the administration of the financially important tourism sector. Boats are restricted for passenger capacity and must follow an approved 15-day itinerary made up of three or four ~2-hour visits to different sites per day with no repeats within the route. This is meant to spread the impact of visiting. In fact, there are only around 115 sites approved for visiting and more than half of them are in the water. Except for a few swimming beaches, all water sites are rated “deep water”, that is, touching the bottom is not allowed.

At times of full capacity there are probably about 1500 paying customers on boat tours and some lower number engaged in day tours from land-based lodgings available in one of the three settlements allowed. All visitors must be accompanied by and stay with a guide, keep strictly to paths and follow the rules. The Guide/Visitor ratio may not exceed 1:16. Removal of material from the islands is forbidden. Visits are allowed only between sunrise and sunset. There is no camping, no exploring. In other words, the islands are run as a nature preserve with the intent of conserving or restoring the environment to the natural scheme of things. The rules do not allow roll-your-own exploration and adventuring of the sort we have been able take for granted in much of our national park system (U.S.).

Some of the day trip fleet at moorings in Puerto Ayora, Isla Santa Cruz
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This island chain is famously associated with the formation of Darwin’s theory of the evolution of species. Today, it serves as a laboratory in the evolution of human society’s conservation practices. If the conservation and restoration effort being made by the Ecuadorian Government is successful, it will in large part be due both to the cap on human presence and the rules for coexistence with the natural world. These help reduce competition for the finite resources available to the endemic flora and fauna and promote a return to the homeostasis that existed before human discovery and exploitation. What lessons may be transferable to the greater world and its burgeoning human population remain to be seen. The inhabitants of the Galápagos are probably living our future, if we should decide we want to keep what we have.

Photo enthusiasts will recognize the famous remark by Ansel Adams to the effect that the negative is the score and the print is the performance. This fairly sums up the Galápagos experience. The Itinerary is the score and the visit is the performance. Just like every other visitor, you must stay on the path and maintain no less than 2 meters distance from the wildlife. If an animal is pointed away from the path, you get a butt shot. It’s that simple. Nor is the visit a deep dive into the surroundings. For not much more than an hour or so, you walk the same path as everybody else—with everybody else. While you will not see something from a new, undiscovered viewpoint, the variables of time of day and year, light, weather conditions, the presence or absence of animals of whatever species and their current behavior –– not even to mention the quality of the guide or the sensibilities of the visitor –– make each visit unique. It’s a little like visiting Hogwarts to view the painting collection.

Another tour group shares the beach with the residents at Isla Santa Fe
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Halfway through the trip, even as this began to dawn on us, we remarked that, in spite of this, the trip seemed only to get better and better –– and it started out great. Thinking about that some more, we came to the conclusion that, actually, we were reacting to the sustained sense of novelty, and that, rather than getting better and better, it simply never stopped being new and different or intensely fascinating –– a benign sensory overload. On more than one occasion, one or the other of our very experienced guides mentioned that they had never seen a particular detail before.

Apparently, Blue-footed Boobies are seldom seen perching on mangrove. So, even though most everyone comes back with a photo of a Blue-footed Booby, this is not the typical image to return from the Galápagos. I’m not too proud to take whatever small victories life sees fit to throw my way. ;)
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Hendrik

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What we took.

Between us, my wife and I were kitted out with five cameras. For starters we took an iPhone each. She carried an Xs and I an 8. That’s already 3 lenses–the Xs has two. I carried two interchangeable lens cameras (E-M1 and E-M1.2), four lenses and a teleconverter. For snorkeling I used a waterproof point-and-shoot zoom (Olympus TG-5, bought for this trip—half the price of a dive case, which, for casual, guided old-fart group snorkeling, would have been serious overkill) and my wife carried a waterproof case for her iPhone Xs (it worked, mostly). When I used my iPhone, it was for video, typically sitting in some conveyance. Of the five cameras only one (E-M1.2) wasn’t asked to shoot video at some point.

Knowing that there would be little need for low light shooting (visiting time restrictions as well as the unlikelihood of any success with boat-based astrophotography) allowed me to bias my lens choice toward reach and versatility: two Pro zooms (12-100 and 40-150) and two primes (17 f1.8 and 300 Pro). The MC-14 completed the roster and gets the MVP medal for being involved in over half of all exposures. I left the monopod and tripod at home. I took an iPad (for on-trip processing) and a Western Digital MyPassport Wireless (for daily backups.)

The conventional wisdom (that is to say, internet chatter) largely agrees that for the Galápagos it’s hardly necessary to carry anything past a mid tele (something like the 12-100). This is true in the sense that one is simply not at risk of being forced to take the long series of “black dot” photos that often accompany poorly equipped travelers back from other wildlife destinations. Indeed, there was almost always something useful and interesting for an iPhone to do, and do quite well, to boot. But there was a lot more to be seen away from the paths, for which the telephotos came in right handy. Also, in the matter of “if your photos aren’t interesting then you’re not close enough”, the two teles (four, if you consider the MC-14) made it possible to deal with the local “you shall not get close” restriction.

Accounting for about 2/3 of all exposures, the 40-150 turned out to be the workhorse of this trip. I half expected it to be so but not by such a margin. The healthy fill of intermediate focal lengths displayed in the images other than the short and long ends suggests that the lens fit the subject matter perfectly.

I was concerned that the 300 would be too long and just so much extra weight. Wrong! It was my second most-used lens and it produced its fair share of keepers. It was mounted to the MC-14 for about half its exposures.

If I didn’t suffer from my (financially) unhealthy fascination with long telephotos, I suspect the 12-100 would have been the nearly perfect single zoom to take. In my Nikon days I had an 18-200 and was happy to go traveling with it, a fast 50mm and the D90. Reach-wise, the O12-100 is not quite as versatile but its IQ easily bests the 18-200 Nikkor. Again, a healthy distribution of shots made at middling focal lengths speaks to the usefulness of this lens. It was certainly in its element in urban Quito.

The O17 brought up the rear in number of shots taken but was indispensable, nonetheless, especially for interiors.

Aside from one or two short (sit on top) kayaking junkets, the TG-5 served primarily as a snorkeling camera and, once in the Galápagos, we snorkeled at least once each day. In the water I shot very few stills, preferring to make videos while swimming in the almost incessant surge. Interestingly, there were at least four other TGs on the trip. Highly recommended for this use!

Within the tour group, with the exception of a Canon DSLR normally seen sporting a honking big zoom, the two E-M1s were at the top of the food chain. Since I will confine this thread to images made with them, about half our activities will be left out of the narrative.
 

Hendrik

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Day One: The Adventure Begins

Two days before embarkation we flew via Miami to Quito. The layover day in Quito featured some light touring and was interesting for most of the assembled traveling group. It was very useful for two other traveling parties who were re-routed for reasons outside their control. Those souls missed the activities in Quito but were fortunate to arrive in time for the flight leaving the next day to the Galápagos via Guayaquil. There would have been no catching up to the boat and two cabins would have been empty. Paid for, but empty.

Once on the ground at a repurposed WWII American airbase on Baltra, we immediately boarded our vessel and made passage for Isla Santiago. Frigate birds accompanied us, keeping station over the bow of the boat. This gave me a chance to mount a long lens and freshen up my BIF skills on birds as they swept in from astern to join or rejoin the crowd. It was a subject-rich couple of hours. My major takeaway was to limit burst length both for purposes of maintaining or reacquiring focus and not filling up a card (which I did, anyway).

Male Frigatebird
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Female Frigatebird
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Our only visit to Isla Santiago consisted of a late afternoon panga ride in the vicinity of the island called Sombrero Chino.
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(The following images were all shot from the panga, which is quite stable but a small boat nevertheless––thank you Oly IBIS.)

We were visiting in the dry season. Low elevations receive little rain and plants were putting on stress colors.
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We started to make the acquaintance of some of the characters we would be encountering for the next several days.

The Sally Lightfoot crabs are always colorful
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Tasteful colors - American Oystercatchers
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Very subtle colors - Galápagos Penguin
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Our guide exclaimed, “That’s Arrow!” Apparently the breast markings of Galápagos Penguins are unique and this individual had been given the name by a researcher investigating the species (which is in decline).
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We left immediately and motored overnight to Isabela - Punta Vicente Roca
 
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Hendrik

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Day Two: Punta Vicente Roca, Isla Isabela

The day started with a panga ride. Among many other sights, we saw:

Brown Noddies
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Galápagos hawk fly-over
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Sea Lion (drive-by snooting?)
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Blue-footed Booby fly-over
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Unfortunately, the sea conditions were deemed too rough for the scheduled snorkeling. This was the only activity canceled during our week on the tour. Instead, we motored over to Fernandina a few hours ahead of schedule.

During the passage we were accompanied by more Frigatebirds

More than most other birds, they built to fly and are capable of impressive aerobatics.
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Fernandina is the youngest island in the chain, currently passing over the hot spot that has created the cluster of islands. It is perhaps 50,000 y/o - notice the broad lava plain
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Hendrik

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Day Two: Punta Espinoza, Isla Fernandina - Late Afternoon Walk I

Later that afternoon we went ashore for an easy walk

Galápagos Hawk
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In describing the Sally Lightfoot crab (Grapsus grapsus), John Steinbeck wrote: “…everyone who has seen them has been delighted with them. The very name they are called by reflects the delight of the name. These little crabs, with brilliant cloisonné carapaces, walk on their tiptoes. They have remarkable eyes and an extremely fast reaction time. In spite of the fact that they swarm on the rocks, they are exceedingly hard to catch.
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“They seem to be able to run in any one of four directions; but more than this, perhaps because of their rapid reaction time, they appear to read the mind of their hunter. If you walk slowly, they move slowly ahead of you in droves. If you hurry, they hurry. When you plunge at them, they seem to disappear in little puffs of blue smoke—at any rate, they disappear.

“It is impossible to creep up on them. They are very beautiful, with clear brilliant colors, reds and blues and warm browns.” (John Steinbeck & Ed Ricketts, Sea of Cortez: A Leisurely Journal of Travel and Research, 1941)
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I’ve seen them jump from rock to rock over large gaps.
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Not so the lumpen marine iguanas
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Escher, anyone?
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Lava lizards feed on flies to be found on iguanas and elsewhere. You never can tell when you might encounter one.
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But the real scene takes us from the sublime to the ridiculous. At the very least it’s a mind bender…
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Hendrik

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Day Two: Punta Espinoza, Isla Fernandina - Late Afternoon Walk II

As mentioned in the introductory post, the resident species display no fear of humans. One walks around thinking that this is what the peaceable kingdom must be like. Animals on land have few natural predators and, if their lack of fright in the presence of humans is considered, most act as if they have none –– sometimes to their disadvantage.

This heron worked on the iguana for several minutes and worried it to death. It was swallowed whole!
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Home, Sweet Home, for flightless cormorants
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Lava Lizard
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Zzzzs
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Last rays
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Lava Cactus
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Sundown is imminent. We start leaving.
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The rules say that visitors may not arrive on an island before sunup and must be off the islands by sunset.
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We motored back across the Bolivar Channel to Tagus Cove on Isabela where we anchored overnight.
 
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Hendrik

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Day Three: Tagus Cove, Isla Isabela - Panga Ride I

The water in Tagus Cove (our overnight anchorage) was very calm and we heard several splashes around the boat. In the spilled light from the crew’s companionway we could see sea lions swimming alongside as well as a pelican or two floating by the boat.

Pre-dawn
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At first light, plenty of pelican activity.
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The first activity this morning was a panga ride

More cormorant domesticity
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Helping with the nest
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Penguin
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Penguin confab (6)
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Day Three: Tagus Cove, Isla Isabela - Panga Ride II

In fact, we had a choice of the panga ride or a strenuous walk to the heights surrounding Tagus Cove. We pushed the easy button and chose the chance to see wildlife from the panga rather than the views promised on the walk.

Iguanas & crabs hauled out above the water level
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Exploring a cleft in the rock
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Inside the cleft - Brown Noddy
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Looking out
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Maintenance - Sea Lion
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Maintenance - Cormorant drying its flightless wings
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Blue-footed Booby flying over
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Day Three: Urbina Bay, Isla Isabela - A Walk

The afternoon ended with a short walk at Urbina Bay

Yellow Warbler
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Darwin's finches gained fame as one of his best arguments for speciation, but he didn't fully recognize their significance at the time of his visit. Besides that...

These are not true finches, but belong to the tanager family
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We meet Darwin - Galapagos Cotton - Gossypium Darwinii
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The land iguanas look substantially more cuddly than the marine iguanas - but perhaps that’s not saying a great deal.
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Sunset passage - pressing on to our overnight anchorage at Elizabeth Bay. Sun setting over Fernandina.
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Hendrik

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Day Four: Elizabeth Bay, Isla Isabela - Early Morning Panga Ride

Palo Santo (Bursera Graveolens), AKA, Incense Tree (center) seen through a gap in the mangrove.
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Mangrove is vivaparous. Plantlets (called propagules) develop while still attached to the parent plant. They are capable of photosynthesis and can feed themselves. When they drop from the parent into the water, they float and travel in a horizontal orientation. They can change that orientation to vertical when conditions are favorable to attach. If they fail to root, they can reverse the process and continue questing. Mangrove propagules can stay alive up to one year.

Propagule seen at left
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Successfully established propagules extending the colony
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Brown Pelican, a baleful gaze
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Sea Turtle in the lagoon
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Returning to the ship. Mangrove at the waterline, Palo Santo behind. The garúa embraces the highlands. On the whole trip, we never saw a drop of rain at sea level.
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Several lava islets dot the bay. Each can serve as a haul-out for the several species that use them. This tiny outcrop hosted a sea lion or two, a marine iguana or two, any number of Sally Lightfoot crabs as well as…

A Penguin, and
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An American Oystercatcher
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Hendrik

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Stunning photos. My favourite is probably the two frigates 'jowling' at each other. I once spent a year on Midway atoll and got to know well several of the species you have shown here. Brought back many memories, thank you, Hendrik.
Thanks, Roddy. Living at Midway for a year –– sounds like an adventure!
 

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Day Four: Punta Moreno, Isla Isabela - Panga Ride

We continued traveling south along the west coast of Isabela. The afternoon was spent at Punta Moreno.

The cone in the background is Santo Tomás
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Mangrove setting up household on a lava islet.
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Another outcrop, as-yet un-colonized by mangrove. Just lava and:

Sally Lightfoot Crabs
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Brown Pelican
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Flightless Cormorant
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Blue-footed Booby
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After motoring a bit between outcrops we arrived at a lagoon protected from the ocean's wave action.

Pelican. On a nest. The nest set in mangrove. The mangrove growing on lava. The ground being fertilized from the sea by the presence of the Pelican. Which is there because…
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Day Four: Punta Moreno, Isla Isabela - Panga Ride - Fishing

Once in the lagoon we witnessed a Blue-Footed Booby Fishing.

Four consecutive shots (low continuous, ~10 fps):

Having sighted possible prey, the Booby has wheeled into a powered dive.
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Stops flapping and starts to fold wings
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Wings folded. You can see the turbulence on the surface caused by the prey fish.
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A clean entry
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Returning to the air for another sortie
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Repeat until sated
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One frame omitted

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We were not able to determine if any of the many attempts were successful.
 

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