Tony Northrup again claims MFT is "likely phased-out"

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I have not watched a Northrup video for years. He does have some useful videos but most of them are pure clickbait like this one. He loves to trash micro 4/3. Screw him. I refuse to click so that he can't get paid for the ads.
 

GBarrington

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To me it's starting to feel like he's going to keep saying this for the next 10+ years until it finally happens. Unlike last time, he also called out multiple other camera mounts. Not that anyone around here agrees with his take on MFT, just expect to see more chatter about "MFT is dead" again.

I've quit watching his stuff, I just don't see him as relevant to me or my photography
 

GBarrington

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As near as I can tell, people have been declaring Olympus 'dead' ever since the late 1960s. It may go back even before that. They will, at times, strategically retreat from certain product lines (Remember when all they had for sale were Point and Shoot film cameras?), but cameras and photography seem to be an integral part of its corporate culture and identity.

I like m43s, I have come to the conclusion that I just don't care if it is dead, or not.
 
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I have seen the video the other day. As a rule, I do not listen to Tony. His 3 group manufacturers and each likely chance to make it is based on what I believe popular opinion. He seems to try and make an educated prediction but he does not want to offend those opinions, he values important?

This is one of the parts that make me think he is completely disconnected and his scenario is nothing else but a wish list... He refers to the EM1X and the EM1 II or III and then talks about the 20MP sensor and the AF.

The camera market is changing fast, formats are changing and demand has decreased sharply. Any marketing department worth anything would have tracked this trend in advance. To make things worse was the unexpected virus outbreak. We know Olympus has been in a 10 year restructure and survival battle. This bad luck might become the most powerful experience and the reason they should get out on the side in good shape.

I know the doomers like to focus on the 2019 losses when moving the factory to Vietnam, but again with what we know now, that was the best move ever Olympus made...

When you study the Olympus restructure, cost-saving programs, and preparing for the future you will see the EM1X and the EM1 III, or the EM5 III (hate the plastic) fits 100% in their future strategy. The days spending unlimited budgets on R&D is history, market prices and quantities just do not support extravagant developments.

This is my personal view but I think Olympus' decision on the X and 2 MKIII releases was good. Improve where it counts and refrain from pleasing tech junkies...

Tony seems to have missed all this. Just the fact that he listed Nikon in his A group shows that he has no feel or understanding of what is taking place in the market...

If I might stick out my head while I know it's taking a huge chance... I have also said from last year when I did a deep dive into Olympus that we will see a Pen F II this year... let's see:

I think:-
- DSLR is now finally dead - only really specialized camera models will survive
- Canon & Nikon waited too long to take the mirrorless segment serious
- A good lens offer is extremely important for survival - only time gets this right
- Even if you release 20 lenses in one year you need consumer acceptance = time
- Only 2 formats have top pro-grade lenses - M43 and full-frame (Fuji has a long way to go)
- Full frame cameras might go really expensive and M43 economically more interesting
- The full-frame or sensor size sales argument is losing speed (Tech & better info)
- I read Fuji had a bad year - interesting - the challenge for Fuji is building a full system
- Whether people like it or not Sony and Olympus are in a healthy & strong position
- Panasonic potentially made a big mistake throwing money at full-frame cameras. The economic situation and 2019/2020 camera market conditions were not ready for that. We should hold our thumbs that they make a timely correction and focus again M43...
- If Panasonic pulls out of M43, I do not think it will hurt Olympus, in fact, it will only help Olympus.

The M43 format and multiple suppliers/manufacturers are strong enough and I would not be surprised when Panasonic pulls out that another will not quickly fill that space...

Think about the Canon R5 and try and see the strategy behind that. The way I see this is, the imaging division is asking the video division to OK video some functionality to bail out imagining division. If the video div. OK that, the question still is, so what? What does Canon like to achieve with the R5 and what is the next step? Do they expect all manufacturers to start packing their cameras with more and more goodies to hopefully hit a segment that will use it... I know this might sound a little light - but think about it, what on earth was Canon thinking when they decided the market is craving for 8K? To me, the R5 looks like a panic signal...

My 2 cents

Siegfried

PS. When I say Olympus is strong - don't look at now or today, project 1 then 2 then 3 years. From their 2020 fin report its clear their pricing, net pricing, and price/performance ratio is healthy. The current new range have most likely good margins for good reason. The factory is done and running. New products are moving plus more new in 2020 is even better. They planned break-even in 2021. Chances are if the markets do not break down completely that it will only conitnue to improve for Olympus. When you do the same summary for other manufacturers, what will it look like?
 
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BrianLa

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Wow mo

Money is no obstacle for you - and Nikon is probably one of the most at risk brands ...
[/QUOTE
Don’t get me wrong, I like RW and R35, but I don’t honestly consider them useful, just watching someone shoot a model in R35’s case while they talk generally about a lens doesn’t really help me make a buying decision, and anyone who is sponsored by a brand is immediately worth unable to accurately review the full spectrum in my mind, which is part of why I’ve never gotten into Robin Wong either. Both are entertaining and good listens/watches, but not who I go to to actually make a buying decision.

Rob Trek Is more helpful in that regard, but so far all the videos I’ve watched of his are basically why you don’t actually need anything other than the kit lens. Which isn’t wrong, but isn’t helpful if I’m looking for anything other than a perspective aimed at helping the people just getting started.
Try watching James Popsys, Dave Griffiths, Tim Day, Chris Eyre-Walker, Andy Rouse and Espen Holland. They take Landscape and Wildlife pictures and show the true capabilities of the micro 4/3rds system in real world use.
Brian
 
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It cracks me up every time I see a thread about Northrup and you guys complaining about him again. Didn't you learn the first time?

In other news, some guy in Alaska is selling a whole load of Olympus gear and some crazy long lenses on eBay. Says he'll throw in a framed photo of a fox, or something. Should I make him an offer? :D
 

RichardC

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It cracks me up every time I see a thread about Northrup and you guys complaining about him again. Didn't you learn the first time?

In other news, some guy in Alaska is selling a whole load of Olympus gear and some crazy long lenses on eBay. Says he'll throw in a framed photo of a fox, or something. Should I make him an offer? :D
Obsolete stuff - ought to be cheap.
 

Equable

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A very kind member on here, once alerted me to Sean Tucker on you tube. Refreshingly different and no gear bias. Very good photographer too, IMHO, but of course everyone has different taste.
As an aside, in my youth I once lived next to a railway line, after a short while the noise no longer affected me. At least I could see the railway line served a purpose.
 

SteveAdler

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As near as I can tell, people have been declaring Olympus 'dead' ever since the late 1960s. It may go back even before that. They will, at times, strategically retreat from certain product lines (Remember when all they had for sale were Point and Shoot film cameras?), but cameras and photography seem to be an integral part of its corporate culture and identity.

I like m43s, I have come to the conclusion that I just don't care if it is dead, or not.
It doesn't matter if it lives or dies. What matters is that the camera market is in decline and soon most of us will be happy to pull out our 50mp smartphones and take stunning photos with computational results that make our far heavier old fashioned cameras a quaint novelty like winding a crank to start a car.
 

RS86

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It doesn't matter if it lives or dies. What matters is that the camera market is in decline and soon most of us will be happy to pull out our 50mp smartphones and take stunning photos with computational results that make our far heavier old fashioned cameras a quaint novelty like winding a crank to start a car.
Are you suggesting bigger sensors or ability to have very wide range of lenses will become obsolete "soon"?

Also do you think the controls and ergonomics of phone camera will match ILC's "soon"?

What about phone screen showing enough to frame a photo in bright light vs. an EVF? Soon?

Also will phones lenses not go to waste when the phone breaks somehow? Or battery dies?

I had to buy new phone because it had one part which broke (under half year after warranty) with the model often and repairing was very expensive (LG G4 with OIS). (Hint: they can design them to break so people keep buying new ones.)
 

demiro

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It doesn't matter if it lives or dies. What matters is that the camera market is in decline and soon most of us will be happy to pull out our 50mp smartphones and take stunning photos with computational results that make our far heavier old fashioned cameras a quaint novelty like winding a crank to start a car.
I'm picturing a bunch of folks in bright orange vests holding phones at a future "major sporting event" in the post-DSLR world. Funny image. It just won't be the same without those big white and black lenses from C and N. :)
 

RS86

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I'm picturing a bunch of folks in bright orange vests holding phones at a future "major sporting event" in the post-DSLR world. Funny image. It just won't be the same without those big white and black lenses from C and N. :)
I'm also waiting for the tilt/swivel screen phone. That will be great to have! It will surely be a strange world soon.
 

SteveAdler

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Are you suggesting bigger sensors or ability to have very wide range of lenses will become obsolete "soon"?

Also do you think the controls and ergonomics of phone camera will match ILC's "soon"?

What about phone screen showing enough to frame a photo in bright light vs. an EVF? Soon?

Also will phones lenses not go to waste when the phone breaks somehow? Or battery dies?

I had to buy new phone because it had one part which broke (under half year after warranty) with the model often and repairing was very expensive (LG G4 with OIS). (Hint: they can design them to break so people keep buying new ones.)
I worked for IBM for 25 years. We created the Mainframe computer, hard disk drives, random access memory, information security, and so much more. IBM still sells mainframe computers but I doubt any of you are aware of when you use them (at the ATM, for example), or that your Smartphone has 20x the computational capacity of an IBM mainframe made in the mid-1990's.

Innovation isn't linear, and market segments constantly change. I already find it more convenient to take my smartphone with me when I explore the area around Valencia with my bike than lug a camera in a backpack for 60km. I'll bet that soon cameras will sport larger image sensors, raw files, and computational computing that upscale digital zoom images. The future of mirrorless cameras is small, thin, light, and in your pocket.

IMHO.
 

demiro

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...
- Panasonic potentially made a big mistake throwing money at full-frame cameras. The economic situation and 2019/2020 camera market conditions were not ready for that. We should hold our thumbs that they make a timely correction and focus again M43...
I agree wholeheartedly with this point Bushman. Panasonic seems questionable to me. Olympus will tolerate a lot of bad performance with regard to photography segment because it is in their DNA to make cameras. Not so with Panny, afaict. I can easily imagine them pulling back to a pro video only platform, though I'm not sure that is a large enough niche to even care about.

We've lived through the golden age of digital (camera) photography. So that's cool, I guess. I think it is dying, but that it will be a very protracted illness. No need to make funeral arrangements today. ;)
 

RS86

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I worked for IBM for 25 years. We created the Mainframe computer, hard disk drives, random access memory, information security, and so much more. IBM still sells mainframe computers but I doubt any of you are aware of when you use them (at the ATM, for example), or that your Smartphone has 20x the computational capacity of an IBM mainframe made in the mid-1990's.

Innovation isn't linear, and market segments constantly change. I already find it more convenient to take my smartphone with me when I explore the area around Valencia with my bike than lug a camera in a backpack for 60km. I'll bet that soon cameras will sport larger image sensors, raw files, and computational computing that upscale digital zoom images. The future of mirrorless cameras is small, thin, light, and in your pocket.

IMHO.
I understand your point but you didn't address any of the shortcomings of phone cameras I stated. Not a single one.
 
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