Tokina now about a dollar a mm

Discussion in 'Native Lenses' started by manzoid, Apr 29, 2013.

  1. manzoid

    manzoid Mu-43 Regular

    137
    Jun 9, 2011
    I know mirror lenses aren't popular and manual focus may not be too popular on this sub-forum, but it looks like the tokina 300mm native prime can be had for ~300 USD now.

    Anyone interested?

    I'm kind of interested not just for the length, but the semi macro and the size, but i think having a prime of that length would mean it doesnt stay on the camera long. That would mean the size advantage is offset significantly by the inconvenience.
     
  2. slothead

    slothead Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 14, 2012
    Frederick, MD
    Hey that's cool. Do they make an 8mm? :smile:
     
  3. Mellow

    Mellow Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 27, 2010
    Florida or Idaho
    Tom
    Interesting how fast price has fallen. I had such great hopes for this lens, and then the reviews all came in at "meh". And it's not AF, which is a shame. I still think the first company who makes an AF good (not great) quality mirror lens will make a mint. The miniature size is just perfect for m43.
     
  4. edmsnap

    edmsnap Mu-43 Veteran

    430
    Dec 20, 2011
    Edmonton, Alberta
    They're popular with me. I think the bokeh is pretty.

    The Tokina has always been priced at $300. Personally, my choice for a deal would be the Vivitar 500mm f/6.3 which runs $160 brand new.

    If the inconvenience of having an extra lens deters you from having the lens, then neither is probably a good buy.
     
  5. manzoid

    manzoid Mu-43 Regular

    137
    Jun 9, 2011
    I could be wrong but I thought the initial price was closer to $400.

    Anyhow regarding my wording, I don't know if I was clear, but i just meant that I suspect having a lens that is fixed at 300mm would mean it would come out only for the occasionally shot... The other 300mm options are actually faster and zoom, so are might be better for a variety of shots, but obviously are bigger. I am not sure which would see more use for me as a result.

    I am also not sure if I need something that long which is probably why I don't have one.

    Anyway do you have the Vivitar you mention? If so how do you find it for IQ, balance and any possibility of hand holding?
     
  6. edmsnap

    edmsnap Mu-43 Veteran

    430
    Dec 20, 2011
    Edmonton, Alberta
    I do have it, mostly for the novelty of that much reach, but I haven't used it a ton. Image quality on a mirror lens is never going to be National Geographic stuff, but it's good for the $160 lens that it is. I find with a mirror, the background is the critical piece; you need something not too busy but not too bland... just enough to get that mirror ring bokeh without drowning in it. When you catch something "in the zone" it's a beautiful effect.

    Mirror lenses have almost no glass in them compared to their standard lens cousins, so they weigh next to nothing for their size which makes balance largely a non-issue. They're also very short so you're not balancing the weight over a long distance. The Vivitar is 651 grams which is just a touch more than twice the weight of the Olympus 75mm and about 100 grams more than the Panasonic 100-300mm. Hand-holding is totally not an issue. I'm aided by the E-M5's stabilization of course.