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Tips for photographing food?

Discussion in 'Native Lenses' started by dlhomesolutions, Apr 12, 2016.

  1. dlhomesolutions

    dlhomesolutions Mu-43 Regular

    172
    Sep 30, 2013
    Peoria, IL
    I got hired to do stone food pics for a small fast food restaurant.

    What lens do you recommend? I was thinking the 12-40 pro, but also maybe the 25mm 1.4.

    Any thoughts?

    Sent from my SM-N920V using Mu-43 mobile app
     
  2. ashburtononline

    ashburtononline Mu-43 Veteran

    389
    Jan 21, 2015
    New Zealand
    I have shot a lot of food ..... You need hot food and need to work fast. The 12-40 should be fine. What lighting do you have? I use a few FL50's in FP TTL mode to get good results. Try not to eat it all :)

    Food
     
  3. dlhomesolutions

    dlhomesolutions Mu-43 Regular

    172
    Sep 30, 2013
    Peoria, IL
    I have 2 constantly light softboxes. I was planning to use those.

    Sent from my SM-N920V using Mu-43 mobile app
     
  4. bmhome1

    bmhome1 Mu-43 Regular

    34
    Mar 4, 2015
    Check out the Resources forum for good tutorial on lighting food.
     
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  5. wjiang

    wjiang Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Yeah, 12-40 is probably all that you'll need. You want to show off the food, so adequate DoF is required. At close up distances you probably don't want shallower than that from f/2.8. The focal length flexibility is more useful I think.

    Make sure you set up your lighting with stand in props first that are as close as possible in size, shape and reflectivity of the real dish (last one might be challenging to get right). Freshly made food doesn't stay looking good for long, you need to be ready to shoot as soon as it comes out.

    Don't be afraid to rearrange the food, toss ugly bits out, prop bits up etc to make it look good. Having an assistant who can help you do that so you don't have to get your hands messy might be helpful.
     
  6. dlhomesolutions

    dlhomesolutions Mu-43 Regular

    172
    Sep 30, 2013
    Peoria, IL
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  7. oldracer

    oldracer Mu-43 All-Pro

    Oct 1, 2010
    USA
    The food looks good; I'm sure the customer is pleased. Next time for similar setups I suggest putting a light source below the camera. Or a big white reflector if you can't arrange a light source. The fairly deep shadow under the plates is distracting and the food closest to the camera could benefit from a little more light as well. Note the dark drumstick (standing vertically) in the photo posted here in the thread. Some more DOF would be nice if you can manage it, too.
     
  8. dlhomesolutions

    dlhomesolutions Mu-43 Regular

    172
    Sep 30, 2013
    Peoria, IL
    When you say more depth of field you mean shooting with a smaller aperture? Like f/11 or so?

    Sent from my SM-N920V using Mu-43 mobile app
     
  9. oldracer

    oldracer Mu-43 All-Pro

    Oct 1, 2010
    USA
    Yes. I would start with the smallest aperture that the lens offers and then try a couple of larger apertures and compare results. At the smallest aperture, diffraction effects may make the photo softer versus a slightly larger aperture. It's a tradeoff.

    Ideally this kind of stuff is shot with a view camera and some tilt to bring the back into focus, but that is old school and expensive so probably not cost-effective to hire for just one restaurant.
     
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