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Timelapse questions

Discussion in 'Filmmaking' started by Tako.dero, Jul 11, 2013.

  1. Tako.dero

    Tako.dero New to Mu-43

    3
    Jul 10, 2013
    It is ok to take timelapse of the sun with mirrorless camera or can it damage the sensor? What about sunset?
    I have a gh3 and a mac.
    Also what are ways of making timelapse videos with the files? I only know of quicktime pro
     
  2. Hardric

    Hardric New to Mu-43

    6
    Jul 12, 2013
    Try adobe lightroom. If your exposures are not long its ok.
     
  3. Hardric

    Hardric New to Mu-43

    6
    Jul 12, 2013
    ...and its good to use uv and cpl filter
     
  4. dwig

    dwig Mu-43 Top Veteran

    622
    Jun 26, 2010
    Key West FL
    Avoid using any filter. They will only add additional reflections and flare. A CPL won't affect the sky anywhere near the sun; its effect is strongest 90 degrees from the sun.
     
  5. Tako.dero

    Tako.dero New to Mu-43

    3
    Jul 10, 2013
    so sunsets should be fine? what if I use a long lens? I'm just wondering because for mirrorless the live view stays on if the shot duration is short, so doesnt that mean the sensor is exposed the whole time? I'm not actually sure if it can be turned off. I'm still new to the camera.
    I also found out cineform studio on the gopro site can also do timelapse and its free.
     
  6. phidauex

    phidauex Mu-43 Regular

    76
    Jun 17, 2013
    Boulder, CO
    You can shoot straight into the sun, don't worry about it. You may be taking lots of exposures, but each one will be very short - and don't over-think it, if the exposure looks good, then by definition you aren't putting too much light on the sensor! If all your exposures are 100% white then maybe you are putting the sensor at risk, but then again, why would you ever shoot 100 all white frames?

    Here is an example, a good number of these frames are shot straight into the sun.

    [ame="http://vimeo.com/69139848"]Bicycle Commute Timelapse 1 on Vimeo[/ame]
     
  7. RobWatson

    RobWatson Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    What the OP means in shooting time lapse is that even though the exposure may be short in live view between the shots the shutter is still open so sun light is there on the sensor. Might be 10-30 minutes of total time with the sun dumping into the camera and onto the sensor!

    I'd be paranoid too! I would setup such that I put a flag to block the light between exposures and manually cover/block the lens. I'd also use shutter shock so I get a strong cue as to when to move the flag out of the way.

    One could always test someone else camera! Or maybe one of the $100 E-P1 can be sacrifices to the cause.
     
  8. phidauex

    phidauex Mu-43 Regular

    76
    Jun 17, 2013
    Boulder, CO
    Hmm, I understand the question, but I still don't think it is a problem. By default the camera lowers the sensitivity on the sensor in order to make a properly exposed preview image, and probably uses an electronic shuttering as well (as it would in video recording mode at 1/60s or something). If the preview image is exposed properly then by definition the sensor is receiving a quantity of light that is within its operational bounds. Maybe you shouldn't use a 1000mm lens to shoot straight into the corona of the sun, but that's not what we are talking about (the camera couldn't generate a properly exposed preview image in this case, so we would be outside of our "if the preview is exposed properly then everything is fine" boundary).

    If it was a problem, there would be warnings about not using your Olympus to shoot video outdoors, since that would be the same situation.

    The flag game sounds like a needless insanity. The worst that will happen is that as the sensor warms up the image noise will increase slightly, with a few more hot pixels, but if you are shooting a sunset the intensity is dropping fast, and won't last for more than a few minutes - even a slight increase in noise won't show up in such hi key images (it is a bigger deal for astrophotographers).
     
  9. phidauex

    phidauex Mu-43 Regular

    76
    Jun 17, 2013
    Boulder, CO
    As for making the final timelapse, Quicktime Pro is a great way to get started with a stack of JPGs. There are many other pieces of software that let you stitch a large number of shots into an MOV or AVI.

    If you want to take it to the next level, use Lightroom and LRTimelapse, a companion app and plugin that lets you "animate" Lightroom develop settings over the course of the timelapse, allowing for smooth day/night transitions, motion effects, white balance adjustments as the light quality changes, etc. The workflow is somewhat complicated, but works amazingly well if you are willing to watch the tutorial videos and go through it slowly. It does have some license fees, but the free/personal license is easy to get started with.

    LRTimelapse - advanced Time Lapse Photography made easy!