Time lapse photography on mu43?

Stephen Geis

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May 13, 2010
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538
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Charlotte, NC
Curious. Has anyone invested in and used one of the multitude of remote shutters with timers for Panasonic or Olympus? I am interested in exploring time lapse photography with the GF1/G2 and/or the E-P2, but hesitant to invest in an off brand remote unless there is someone who has had a positive experience.

Thanks in advance for your help.

Stephen
 

john1027

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Mar 5, 2010
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Alexandria, VA USA
Stephen,

I had used a Pro-Master brand with the E-P2 with no issues. I picked up the Panasonic brand (DMW-RSL1) for the G2 at B&H and it works fine. I am very much a novice at the time lapse exposures but did have some success with some moon on the water images when I was on vacation in New England using the G2.
 

squeegee

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Jan 26, 2010
Messages
403
I had bought one of those cheapos off ebay. With the exception of an auto-focus glitch caused by the mis-soldered wire :rolleyes: ... it works fine. It has a timer and everything and just keeps clicking away for the duration set. I should note though that the timer itself is off too... it seems to be off by about 1 second per 30 seconds or minute but it's still "regular" photos. Just don't expect it to be high precision timing...

The thread talking about it is here :
https://www.mu-43.com/f67/remote-release-e-p2-1808/
 

PeterB666

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Jan 14, 2010
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Tura Beach, Australia
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Peter
I bought one of these for my Olympus E-P1 - as cheap as chips... Timer Remote Control

The same unit is sold under about a dozen or so different brand names. I know of serveral who have bought the Nikon and Canon version of these and some have bought locally at up to 3 times the cost. Ouch!

Works well but the time interval when using 'bulb' must include focus time (if not set to manual focus) and any delay built in between shots. Once you get the hang of it, it works well.
 

Stephen Geis

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Joined
May 13, 2010
Messages
538
Location
Charlotte, NC
Thanks everyone for your responses! Will look through these choices and pull the trigger on one later this week and let you all know how it goes.

Stephen
 

pdh

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May 6, 2010
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I be interested to know how long a battery might last doing TL ... switching off the LCD and using MF...
 

Stephen Geis

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Joined
May 13, 2010
Messages
538
Location
Charlotte, NC
I am not able to assess total battery length. But I have set up my GF1, shut the LCD off and used a manual focus lens for taking timelapse photographs of an Amaryllis overnight. After about 7 hours, the battery in my GF1 was drained completely.

Still have yet to drain the battery on my remote.
 

Kade.Sirin

Mu-43 Regular
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Sep 23, 2010
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47
Location
Las Vegas
So based upon that, we would need some kind of AC adapter to properly do say.. a day's worth of time lapse?
 

pdh

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May 6, 2010
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598
hmm wonder how my E-P2 compares on power usage to the Gs ...
 

arpoador

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Jan 19, 2010
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san francisco ca usa & rio de janeiro br
was that on raw?
No. I started with raw, but then realized that by the time I compress the image down to 1080p and show each image only 1/24th of a second, there's not much advantage to raw. Since I always shoot my stills in raw mode, I created a custom setting (C3 - I don't know why I started with the third one) for this purpose.

In this particular experiment, I was still shooting a Large (full resolution) image, then downsizing it in Lightroom. I have since changed the setting to Small JPG, letting me import the images directly into QuickTime and skip Lightroom altogether.

That does mean I have to be very deliberate about framing and exposure upfront, since there's little margin for adjustment afterwards. The framing's no big deal (since it's on a tripod, and I have enough lenses to get what I want). The exposure, though, has been a challenge.

I started with manual exposure, but I couldn't keep up with the changes in lighting, and the effect was choppy. I switched to Aperture priority mode, which brings two problems:
1) The autoexposure algorithm on the G2 is a step function, so you see the jumps. In addition, it's sometimes jerky, changing it's mind after a few minutes and letting in more light. Haven't quite figured that out yet. (More on that below.)
2) I really wanted the image to get darker after sunset, but simple A mode won't do that for me.

The trick I settled on is to rely on the maximum speed of the shutter (1/4000) to "pin" the exposure. If a lens is wide open on a sunny day (around f/2.8 or f/2.0), 1/4000 is about right for a good exposure. So I set it at EV -2 (which makes it look good in the dark) and let it go. Until sunset, the camera tries to do EV -2, but fails, because it can't go faster than 1/4000. The result is a well-exposed image. As the sky darkens, the Aperture-priority program kicks in, and the exposure drops to the appropriate night-time level. I didn't use that trick here, because I wanted to experiment with the cool "stars" diffraction you get when you stop down an old Nikon lens.

If you watch this flic, you'll see that the camera gets confused around 1/3 of the way through, and everything gets brighter again. I haven't figured it out yet, but it seems to coincide with when the fog rolls into the mid-ground, so the lack of contrast may also be confusing the exposure algorithm.
 
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