Tilt Transformer is so money

Discussion in 'Native Lenses' started by OdzBodkinz, Feb 15, 2012.

  1. OdzBodkinz

    OdzBodkinz Mu-43 Regular

    153
    Sep 11, 2011
    Lensbaby Composer and Tilt Transformer on G3.

    smugshot6947928-XL.
     
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  2. ZephyrZ33

    ZephyrZ33 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    685
    Nov 18, 2010
    Southern California
    This is what i see when im trying to close a weekend bar tab.
     
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  3. speedandstyle

    speedandstyle Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    So you are color blind?
     
  4. speedandstyle

    speedandstyle Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    How do you like the lensbaby? I am thinking about getting one but not sure. Did you use the lensbaby optic or a Nikon lens?
     
  5. ZephyrZ33

    ZephyrZ33 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    685
    Nov 18, 2010
    Southern California
    Completely...after a few rounds of scotch. Gawd bless the new Olympus AWB.
     
  6. pxpaulx

    pxpaulx Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 19, 2010
    Midwest
    Paul
    He said it was the lensbaby composer just above the image. You can kind of tell with the out of focus parts being just a wash of the image, rather than gradually increasing out of focus areas, that seems to be a characteristic of the lens baby lenses as far as i can tell - the don't necessarily have a traditional bokeh look to them.
     
  7. OdzBodkinz

    OdzBodkinz Mu-43 Regular

    153
    Sep 11, 2011
    Yes, definitely the supplied LB optic, which provides an 35mm equivalent of 80mm. It focuses nice and close too, as you can see.
     
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  8. adelorenzo

    adelorenzo Mu-43 Regular

    113
    Nov 9, 2011
    Whitehorse, Yukon
  9. speedandstyle

    speedandstyle Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    The tilt transformer can use lenbaby optics{well the basic ones at least} OR Nikon lenses.
    lb_tt_nikon_lens.

    Lensbaby - Composer with Tilt Transformer - Lens for Micro 4/3rds and Sony NEX | Tilt Adapter


    Sadly the "Sweet 35" can not be used with the tilt transformer{the only lenbaby lens for the m43!}. Lenbaby just released a new optic , the "Edge 80" but it can't be used on the tilt transformer either. Also the fisheye will not work on the tilt transformer.
     
  10. OdzBodkinz

    OdzBodkinz Mu-43 Regular

    153
    Sep 11, 2011
    Not so fast Speed! A Lensbaby employee told me that those optics will in fact work with the new macro adapters installed (they are basically rings, with no optics). Specifically he told me the 35 and the Fisheye would work...but I don't see why the 80 wouldnt either. I have a macro adapter set coming to me, so I will confirm for sure.
     
  11. speedandstyle

    speedandstyle Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    That would be great if they do! The sweet 35 looks like a nicer and easier to use setup than the standard optic with the magnetic apertures, the new 80 looks nice too. I really don't like fisheyes so I could care less on that one. I will wait until your post , thanks!
    :thumbup:
     
  12. Farcanalman

    Farcanalman  

    144
    Feb 12, 2012
    wtf does bokeh mean?

    And can anyone explain, apart from the wild image results, how does a tilt lens impart it's effect? It obviously tilts, but for us uninitiated in the marvels of 'bendy' lenses, how does it do what it does to the viewed image?

    :eek::confused:
     
  13. David A

    David A Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 30, 2011
    Brisbane, Australia
    The image projected by a lens falls in a plane that normally coincides with the sensor plane. A tilt lens causes the image plane to fall at an angle to the sensor plane, the 2 planes insect in a manner determined by the angle of tilt of the lens. Parts of the image plane that do not coincide with the sensor plane therefore end up out of focus, how far out of focus depending on how far that part of the imag plane is from the sensor. You get a sharp area of focus in a line where then2 planes intersect.
     
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  14. Iconindustries

    Iconindustries Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Hilarious username mate.

    My view on bokeh is the texture or the way the out of focus points of light are rendered in an image. Different brands of lenses have characteristics in the way they display the out of focus areas and they can range from soft swirls to more dominant or distracting blur.

    I'm probably fairly safe to say that you can think of bokeh spelt (boh-kay) as a fancy word for blur.

    In this picture I took with a Tokina 24mm on my GF1 you can clearly see the Bokeh

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/50527022@N02/6141542187/" title="More Nature with the Tokina 24 2.8 by iconindustries, on Flickr"> 6141542187_d5c68b6608_b. "1024" height="768" alt="More Nature with the Tokina 24 2.8"></a>
     
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  15. pxpaulx

    pxpaulx Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 19, 2010
    Midwest
    Paul
    Yep, a fancy word for blur, or more specifically how a specific lens renders the out-of-focus areas of an image. It is an inherently subjective discussion, all lenses have their own particular looks and you're free to like or dislike the bokeh of a particular lens as you wish!

    Things that affect the out of focus area of a photo within the lens itself include the aperture setting, number of aperture blades, types of glass used in a lens, focal length and probably other factors is well, which add up to make each lens unique (though it will be, or should be...the same within copies of the same lens).
     
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  16. Farcanalman

    Farcanalman  

    144
    Feb 12, 2012
    By the way, sorry to the thread starter for the inadvertant hi-jack!

    I am glad that now I understand, whereas before I was ignorant of bokeh!

    I can almost hear old master shang saying; " to attain true bokeh mastery, you must become one with the lens!"

    A 'grasshopper' moment if ever there was one.

    :rofl:

    Andreas the enlightened
     
  17. flash

    flash Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Apr 29, 2010
    1 hour from Sydney Australia.
    Gordon
    Bokeh is an anglosised version of the Japanese work "boke" which means blur. The "h" was added by Mike Johnson, then editor of popular photography to aid in pronunciation. Bokeh refers to the qualities of the blurred areas in a photograph. In reality there isn't good or bad bokeh. Smooth, jittery and caffeinated are words used to describe bokeh. Good or bad bokeh are only in the eye of the beholder.

    Tilt lenses make use of the Schleimflug principal.

    schlemphlug principal - Google Search

    Basically there is only one true plane of sharp focus in an image, which is at the distanced you focused at. Then there is an area of acceptable sharpness in front and behind called the depth of field. A tilt lens lets you tilt the plane of focus to increase or decrease the zone that is actually in focus without needing to rely on DOF, by moving the plane of focus closer or further away from being parallel to the subjects plane. Tilting a lens toward the plane of the subject (ie parallel to it)will render more in focus and away will render less. For example when shooting a landscape, if you can rotate the front element downwards so it is closer to being parallel to the earth then you will get more in focus without having to increase the aperture and therefore DOF. It can also be used creatively to deliberately move the plane of focus away from a subject. This gives a shot with a narrower area in focus. If you used the lens baby adaptor with a Nikon lens you would get this effect. The advantage of using tilt lenses is that you can actually get more IN focus. DOF is subjective and affected by other factors like print size. If something is actually at the focus point it will always appear sharp regardless of viewing size.

    The composer lens is different again. It is sharp in only a portion of the lens (determined by the size and shape of the aperture discs used. Then the mount allows you to place that "sweet spot" any where in the fram you want.

    If nothing else you get to impress your friends working the word Schleimflug into a conversation.

    Gordon
     
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  18. Farcanalman

    Farcanalman  

    144
    Feb 12, 2012
    Oh dear...

    And my eyes nearly glazed over with the attention of a wholly new technical concept!

    :eek:

    It is more of an interpetative thing, for use by those far more artisticly endowed or adventurous than I, although you never know when I might find a place in time to apply this principle. Very interesting indeed!

    So it is a Japanese based word/phrase; so strike Shang and replace with Miyamoto Musashi... I'll get my coat! :redface:

    I left photography in any formal sense in the early 80's and only now am I back in touch with the one truly artistic thing I ever tried, I hope to share some of my attempts at this noble, contemporary art soon.

    Thanks so much for the education; just shows that if you do not ask, you might stumble around in the dark for far too long!

    :2thumbs: :43:

    Andreas
     
  19. speedandstyle

    speedandstyle Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    "Boke" is the shortened form of the original Japanese term , the full term is "boke-aji" which would translate to blur quality.
     
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  20. speedandstyle

    speedandstyle Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Never heard back , how does it work with the macro set?