Tilt & Shift

Discussion in 'Adapted Lenses' started by icy_se7en, Apr 22, 2012.

  1. icy_se7en

    icy_se7en Mu-43 Regular

    70
    Apr 17, 2011
    I dont know if this is the correct place to post this but im looking for cheapish/medium priced tilt & shift adapter or lens or maybe even a tutorial on how to make one, does anyone know how to or where I can buy a cheap adapter or lens? Ive also seen tutorials on the net but they dont really explain much on how to make one.
     
  2. icy_se7en

    icy_se7en Mu-43 Regular

    70
    Apr 17, 2011
    Anyone?
     
  3. RDM

    RDM Mu-43 All-Pro

    I know of many adapters that adapt a legacy lens to µ4/3cameras that are shift adapters and others that are tilt adapters. I have not yet seen any that are Both tilt and shift.
    I have seen a tilt shift lens tho, here, although i think it is not wide enough. I still do not understand why someone cant make an adapter that is both tilt and shift for lets say a Nikon or M42 screw mount if register distance is the problem, but then again maybe even those register distances are still not long enough to incorporate both adjustments in one adapter..
     
  4. icy_se7en

    icy_se7en Mu-43 Regular

    70
    Apr 17, 2011
    Hmm I dont have that kinda money lol what adapters do you know of? Any links aswell? Thanks
     
  5. mauve

    mauve Mu-43 Top Veteran

    892
    Mar 9, 2010
    Paris, France
    May we know why you are so interested in those adapters / lenses ?

    Just to frame the discussion : there are no native tilt-shift lenses for :43: yet.

    There are adapters that do either tilt or shift.

    And finally, there are 35mm film lenses that can either do tilt-shift or shift alone (the latter being called Perspective Correction lenses, shortened PC).

    In 'ye olden times of lore', tilt was less desirable in a lens than shift.

    So, you can find today a PC lens (shift) and a tilt adapter to have both movements.

    But even 'simple' PC lenses like the famed OM 24mm and 35mm will fetch high prices and they will be big, heavy, and cumbersome to use.

    Software post-processing with such tools as the olympus 'diaporama' filter or the perspective correction tool can emulate tilt-shift to a certain extent, and they are free. Do you really need to go all the way and use a physical, specialty, lens to achieve your pictures ?
     
  6. dhazeghi

    dhazeghi Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 6, 2010
    San Jose, CA
    Dara
    Don't know what you consider cheap, but there are a wide variety of tilt adapters from m4/3 to other legacy mounts in the $60-120 range. Search eBay 'micro tilt adapter'. I've read some good reviews of the Kipon ones (one example).

    Shift adapters tend to be more expensive and also more demanding of lenses. One thing to keep in mind is that some adapters are too long and cannot focus properly at infinity. Fotodiox, Kipon and others make them.

    DH
     
  7. icy_se7en

    icy_se7en Mu-43 Regular

    70
    Apr 17, 2011
    I am interested because id like to take pics with the tilt/shift effect without having to edit my pics on the pc all the time. I found a Kipon adapter but its £78 I was looking for something abit cheaper :\
     
  8. mauve

    mauve Mu-43 Top Veteran

    892
    Mar 9, 2010
    Paris, France
    What you're looking for is just the tilt effect, really. The shift is only useful to frame a high building while keeping the camera level, thus keeping perspective in order. The so-called "shift-tilt effect" is the result of tilt only.

    Now, we're speaking about niche market and precision engineered devices, and neither of them pairs very well with cheapness, so both of them united... explains a lot. But £78 is very cheap compared to the price of a dedicated shift-tilt lens.

    Just sayin'.

    Now, if you don't care too much about silly things like infinity focus, sharpness etc., I've seen someone wedging a lens into a slice of rubber hose a couple of centimeters long, and distorting that contraption in front of the lens-less camera. It sort of works, for some values of work at least.

    Cheers,
     
  9. inkista

    inkista Mu-43 Veteran

    332
    Jan 13, 2012
    San Diego, CA
    There are m4/3 tilt-shift lenses on eBay, which look to be the successors of the old Hartblei super-rotator type lenses. Instead of cheap medium format lenses on t/s adpaters for SLRs, we now have cheap SLR lenses on t/s adapters for m4/3. So, don't expect to find a wide angle one.

    Google up Photex, Arax, or Arsat. There's a $350 50mm f/2 that's pretty easy to find. The glass isn't particularly good, though.
     
  10. dhazeghi

    dhazeghi Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 6, 2010
    San Jose, CA
    Dara
    For that reason, I'd suggest going for a tilt or shift adapter and an SLR lens. For $150 you can get a significantly better legacy lens and an adapter. I had the Photex 35/2.8 tilt-shift for Nikon and the only nice thing I can say is that it was well built. The optics were disappointing, and that was on a sensor far less demanding than the m4/3 ones.

    DH
     
  11. Sawfish

    Sawfish Mu-43 Regular

    70
    Nov 11, 2011
    Denmark
    I didn´t know that Hartblei have made cheap lenses. There new offerings seems quite expensive, with the 40 mm as their cheapest option a 2295 €.

    But even at that price, they should offer good value. :tongue:

    Sf
     
  12. icy_se7en

    icy_se7en Mu-43 Regular

    70
    Apr 17, 2011
    I was looking for something around £20-50 lol. Ive seen the hose thing your talking a about but it dont really explain how to make it
     
  13. inkista

    inkista Mu-43 Veteran

    332
    Jan 13, 2012
    San Diego, CA
    Yeah. The new ones have Zeiss glass. The old ones had Arsat glass. They were also super-fugly.

    384867444_7379c38c66_z.

    But did the trick.

    1400489427_218adbe76c_z.

    Today, the Arax/Arsat ones aren't nearly as bad-looking. :D And value is in the eye of the beholder.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  14. icy_se7en

    icy_se7en Mu-43 Regular

    70
    Apr 17, 2011
    How much would one of these cost?
     
  15. inkista

    inkista Mu-43 Veteran

    332
    Jan 13, 2012
    San Diego, CA
    Well, the Hartbleis mostly don't exist any more. Hartblei stopped making them and now sells Zeiss versions of the lenses, which are considerably more expensive (as noted above).

    The Arsat/Arax SLR tilt-shifts are still around on eBay. The going price on the 35/2.8 seems to be around $700, and the 80/2.8 for around $400 (which is what I paid for my Hartblei SR 80/2.8). Samyang/Rokinon also announced they're coming out with a 24mm T/S sometime this year.

    Their mechanism is a little odd compared to the OEM tilt-shifts, since you can adjust the angle of tilt all the way around, so you're not just able to tilt or swing, but you can also do a diagonal tilt at whatever angle you choose (hence the "super-rotator" name Hartblei used).

    The m4/3 50mm/2 is about $350, as I said in my first post. You can also find some of them on Amazon. Just search for "Photex tilt shift."
     
    • Like Like x 1
  16. icy_se7en

    icy_se7en Mu-43 Regular

    70
    Apr 17, 2011
    Lol I wont have that kinda money until I find another job but thanks for the info. Back to DIY it is! :p
     
  17. dhazeghi

    dhazeghi Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 6, 2010
    San Jose, CA
    Dara
    Don't be too disappointed. I had the Photex 35/2.8 T/S. The optics were pretty bad. I seriously doubt a DIY solution could be worse.

    DH
     
  18. icy_se7en

    icy_se7en Mu-43 Regular

    70
    Apr 17, 2011
    Well thats the thing atleast with a DIY option you can choose what lens you wanna use. I saw a video on youtube someone made a T/S lens with a Helios 44mm I think, I cant remember the focal length but he got some pretty good results!
     
  19. inkista

    inkista Mu-43 Veteran

    332
    Jan 13, 2012
    San Diego, CA
    Maybe just go freelensing.

    The only difference between having a T/S lens and DIY-type solutions is the precision of control you have over the movements. If you just want to thin the DoF, you don't need particularly fine control, like you do when you extend the DoF, or are using shift to do perspective correction / remove keystoning.
     
  20. dhazeghi

    dhazeghi Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 6, 2010
    San Jose, CA
    Dara
    A 50/1.4 or 50/1.8 is generally a safe bet. The link I posted upthread was from a guy using the Nikon 50/1.8 and the shots he got look quite decent.

    DH