travelbug

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I have always been fascinated by the cosmos and astrophotography even as a young kid. So when I learned about star trackers that were compact enough, and precise enough to use without an auto guider, I decided to get one myself.
My first consideration was the Ioptron SkyGuider Pro. It produced consistently good results and afforded the ability to upgrade to a more sophisticated (and expensive!) setup in the future. However, I knew Id want to take my tracker to trips and travels and so I felt that the Ioptron was still too big for a portable, tavel setup.
I then found out about the move shoot move mini rotator. Size-wise it was perfect. I ordered one with the laser, the guide scope and the equatorial mount.
The mount itself was not great, and I hope they refine its design in the future. The other parts and accessories looked fine.
I had the opportunity to test the setup for the first time with polar alignment. The issue with where I live is, polaris is so low that you need to be in a hill or mountain to get any type of polar alignment.
I climbed a mountain last Jan 6-8 and spent 2 nights trying the setup. The first night was a complete failure as I attached the laser scope the wrong way. I reviewed the directions, and got it correct for the second night. I didnt have the polar scope with me so this was a rough laser alignment, which was my first time to do it.
I used my Olympus em5ii and Panasonic 100-300ii together with a sturdy Leofoto 324c and an extra generic ballhead.
I did a number of different shutter speeds, from 20 to 40 secs, and different iso's from 1000-3200. In the end, I settled on my iso 3200, 40 secs f5.6 set. Out of the 20 images I took, I stacked the 12 best, as the rest had some significant streaking. I processed the images through Sequator and then photoshop.
I think, all in all, Im satisfied with the output, and hope to get better results with more practice and when I get a tripod collar for the 100-300ii.

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3dpan

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I did a number of different shutter speeds, from 20 to 40 secs, and different iso's from 1000-3200. In the end, I settled on my iso 3200, 40 secs f5.6 set. Out of the 20 images I took, I stacked the 12 best, as the rest had some significant streaking. I processed the images through Sequator and then photoshop.
I think, all in all, Im satisfied with the output, and hope to get better results with more practice and when I get a tripod collar for the 100-300ii.

View attachment 797610
That's very impressive, especially for a first (?) attempt.
The secret for the Orion Nebula, if you have the time and patience, is to do about three sets of exposures, one at maybe 2 seconds (exposing for the bright core), then another at maybe 30 seconds (exposing for mid brightness) and then the third set at 2 or 3 minutes (exposing for the faint nebulocity.
Stack those 3 sets of images separately to give 3 semi-final images.
Then merge those three images in an HDR program. That final image should show detail in the core, surrounding areas, and the faint nebulocity.

Just for encouragement, and not trying to hijack your thread, here is my attempt using the HDR method from a few years ago,

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Cheers,
 
Last edited:

travelbug

Mu-43 Veteran
Joined
Oct 20, 2014
Messages
405
Location
New York
That's very impressive, especially for a first (?) attempt.
The secret for the Orion Nebula, if you have the time and patience, is to do about three sets of exposures, one at maybe 2 seconds (exposing for the bright core), then another at maybe 30 seconds (exposing for mid brightness) and then the third set at 2 or 3 minutes (exposing for the faint nebulocity.
Stack those 3 sets of images separately to give 3 semi-final images.
Then merge those three images in an HDR program. That final image should show detail in the core, surrounding areas, and the faint nebulocity.

Just for encouragement, and not trying to hijack your thread, here is my attempt using the HDR method from a few years ago,

View attachment 797612

Cheers,
No worries at all, and yes Im glad to get more info and tips on astro as it isnt really my field of expertise. i do know about hdr stacking and lrgb usage in deep space astro, but I wanted to stick to the very basics first, as this was my first attempt. Ill have to try again with my polar scope; and then try to do all the fancy post process stuff after.
 

AllanG

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M42 from the Southern Hemisphere.....note the invertion/rotation compared to the Northern hemisphere
Nice images using m43 cameras but it's a delicate object that needs a lot of data at different exposures to blend seamlessly together to give o coherent image in my opinion.
 

travelbug

Mu-43 Veteran
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Oct 20, 2014
Messages
405
Location
New York
View attachment 797641

M42 from the Southern Hemisphere.....note the invertion/rotation compared to the Northern hemisphere
Nice images using m43 cameras but it's a delicate object that needs a lot of data at different exposures to blend seamlessly together to give o coherent image in my opinion.
amazing capture, what equipment did you use for this.
 

AllanG

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125mm refractor with a QSI5 camera on a EQ6 mount.
About one hour each using R,G and B filers and the same using a luminance filter.
 

travelbug

Mu-43 Veteran
Joined
Oct 20, 2014
Messages
405
Location
New York
125mm refractor with a QSI5 camera on a EQ6 mount.
About one hour each using R,G and B filers and the same using a luminance filter.
that seems like a hefty rig. At the moment, I want to stick to something more portable. If I really get into it, and if I find that I can do deep space from my rural residence, then I might invest in an ioptron skyguider pro, an auto guider, and maybe a zwo astro dedicated camera and a williams space cat. But thats a big IF, since this is more a complement to my main genre which is landscapes.
 
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