1. Welcome to Mu-43.com—a friendly Micro 4/3 camera & photography discussion forum!

    If you are thinking of buying a camera or need help with your photos, you will find our forum members full of advice! Click here to join for free!

The Moment of Impact

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by jhawk1000, Aug 9, 2018.

  1. jhawk1000

    jhawk1000 Mu-43 Regular

    38
    Jun 30, 2013
    Kansas
    Mel
    I bought a gently used Olympus OM-D EM-10 and have been trying it out before carrying it and a bunch of lenses to Ireland in a couple of weeks. I own Nikons (D800, D750, D700, D2x, and lots of film Nikons) but the weight has caused me to try out M43. I started with an Olympus EPL-1, then got a Panasonic G5, and now the OM-D. I own the Olympus 14-42 kit lens, the Olympus 40-150, a Panasonic 25mm 1.7 and a Sigma 60mm 2.8. My wife is a professional photographer and she also teaches sports photography. The class members were able to go to the National Baseball Congress world series on Monday and had free roam of the stadium. I tagged along with the OM-D EM-10 with the venerable Olympus 40-150mm lens. I got this picture of the hitter actually making contact with the ball and the bat is even bent from the impact. I was impressed. 38732737_10157838367428747_8969921421102809088_o.
     
    • Like Like x 20
    • Winner Winner x 5
  2. drd1135

    drd1135 Zen Snapshooter

    Mar 17, 2011
    Southwest Virginia
    Steve
    Nice "catch". :biggrin:
     
    • Like Like x 2
  3. ToxicTabasco

    ToxicTabasco Mu-43 Veteran

    269
    Jul 2, 2018
    South West USA
    Excellent timing. Looks like he missed the sweet spot of the bat. That must have hurt.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. Dogman

    Dogman Mu-43 Veteran

    233
    Dec 23, 2012
    Maryland
    Maybe the bent bat is a result of the rolling shutter effect rather than impact.
     
    • Agree Agree x 5
  5. jhawk1000

    jhawk1000 Mu-43 Regular

    38
    Jun 30, 2013
    Kansas
    Mel
    Not really. If you look at very slow motion video of bats hitting the ball, the bat will distort as will the baseball. I have seen videos of wooden bats bending much more than this picture and the ball actually looking squashed. This is not rolling shutter. I photograph a lot of baseball from a inner city league, high school baseball, college baseball and even affiliated baseball and have seen this often from video and photos of our sports photographers.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • Informative Informative x 1
  6. They might all be suffering rolling shutter... at high enough speed even mechanical shutters have slight rolling shutter effect. Any video from confirmed global shutters?
     
  7. jhawk1000

    jhawk1000 Mu-43 Regular

    38
    Jun 30, 2013
    Kansas
    Mel
    I do not have video from a confirmed global shutter. I rely on what I have seen from slow-motion video on sports channels and on the expertise of the photographers for our large daily newspaper. That and a former player of a large Big 12 team who also coaches baseball. Do I have any hard evidence? No, but I do trust my sources. I might be wrong but ..........
     
  8. jhawk1000

    jhawk1000 Mu-43 Regular

    38
    Jun 30, 2013
    Kansas
    Mel
    Here is another shot of a batter swinging away with no contact and no distortion.
    P8060067.
    E-M10    OLYMPUS M.40-150mm F4.0-5.6 R    150mm    f/8.0    1/1250s    ISO 400
     
    • Like Like x 1
  9. How’s this for bat bend - just as you captured when the ball hit out of the sweet spot:

     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2018
    • Like Like x 2
  10. jhawk1000

    jhawk1000 Mu-43 Regular

    38
    Jun 30, 2013
    Kansas
    Mel
    Thanks for that video.
     
  11. ToxicTabasco

    ToxicTabasco Mu-43 Veteran

    269
    Jul 2, 2018
    South West USA
    I don't think so. Usually in rolling shutter the fastest moving part of the object in the shot gets left behind. Like in pics of propeller aircraft the faster part of the blade is traling in a bent blade. In this case it's the opposite where the bat's fastest moving part is ahead.

    And in cases where everything is panned at the same speed, the bottom of the pic gets left behind because in most digital cameras the shutter or electronic scan works from top down.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Informative Informative x 1
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.