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The future of sensors?

Discussion in 'Open Discussion' started by chonbhoy, Jan 12, 2014.

  1. chonbhoy

    chonbhoy Mu-43 Veteran

    430
    Apr 23, 2013
    Scottish Highlands
    Myself and a guy i know called dad:tongue: was chatting about the possibilities of the m43 system based on the restriction of the sensor size, a lot of blah blah blah was spoken and not a curse or a a swear word was said:smile:. Overall the conversation was very positive around the limitations in it's present format but yet again we were getting into blah blah blah territory:wink:, then an idea was mentioned that made me wonder if it was possibly a way forward for not but m43 sensors but all sensors. We talked about the idea that through the technological advancement of curved LCD TV screens surely it would be possible to make a curved/partly spherical wafer that the sensor is made from, making it a lot more accurate at capturing the light instead of using processing corrections and therefore freeing up more resolving power to the chip.
    Anybody on here have a degree in optics or photonics that can shed some light lol on this idea for better sensors.
    Here's a wiki link to the nature of light in 3dimensions http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Light_cone

    I do wonder if the sensor would require each pixel to be spherical or not? I have no idea at present.
     
  2. HappyFish

    HappyFish Mu-43 Top Veteran

    983
    Sep 8, 2012
    Chad
    I hear future is organic sensors ?
    dude on one of the fuji forums did a nice write up on those :)
     
  3. chonbhoy

    chonbhoy Mu-43 Veteran

    430
    Apr 23, 2013
    Scottish Highlands
    http://www.whatdigitalcamera.com/ne...future-technology-for-the-compact-camera.html
    This is a step forward at 1.2x more performance from what i gather which is great, but what we envisioned is a game changer purely because what you capture in light is more precise from a physics perspective therefore making lens design simpler. The knock on effect would be that the present processors have more available power to be better at other things instead of corrections as well.
     
  4. mattia

    mattia Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    May 3, 2012
    The Netherlands
    While a curved sensor may make lens design easier, it might make centering and alignment even more challenging (instead of just projecting onto a flat plane, you need to get pitch, yaw and roll spot on). Honestly, we've already hit the point where for most people, in most situations, current sensor tech is already more than 'good enough'. Per pixel noise performance has improved over the past few years, but not in a hugely significant way. All this has resulted in, in my opinion, is that we're getting higher MP fullframe sensors with equivalent per pixel performance (and thus better performance at any given display size), and allowed smaller sensor cameras (i.e. MFT) to become good enough - I was never impressed with the 12MP sensors, and the 16 MP sensors are still outclassed by their FF bretheren, the tech is good enough to make MFT a sweet spot in a lot of ways. I'm sure the sensors will get better, and I'd love 20 MP from my MFT cameras, though I'm not sure whether all of the glass will be up to the challenge.

    Current sensor tech has pretty much stalled, and we've got at least three technologies that all deliver great results (X-trans and regular Bayer sensors for good low and high ISO, Sigma's Foveon tech for pretty stunning low ISO shots; wish they could design bodies as well as they do lenses and sensors) that in real-world prints and for all web use are indistinguishable from each other, and haven't significantly moved along in 4 or 5 years - e.g. differences in quality between the 6 year-old Canon 5DII and the 5DIII are marginal, and the sensor from Nikon's D800(E), almost 2 years old now, hasn't been improved on (test results from Sony's A7R indicate the two are identical).
     
  5. wjiang

    wjiang Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    We still haven't really seen what BSI-CMOS/Stacked CMOS on larger sensor cameras can do yet. BSI-CMOS is how the newer cell phones (e.g. iPhone, Nexus) and cameras like the RX100 II have so much less noise than previous generations of compacts.
     
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  6. mattia

    mattia Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    May 3, 2012
    The Netherlands
    Consensus on the RX100 vs RX100 II was that while there is some difference, it's not huge. That's what I got from reviews and looking at samples, anyway.