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The Dreams of Bees

Discussion in 'Nature' started by MarkB1, Jun 8, 2011.

  1. MarkB1

    MarkB1 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    546
    Oct 30, 2010
    Australia
    As the still bright sun goes down behind the clouds over the woods on a cold and windy day, a Blue Banded Bee gets ready for the long dark night through which he cannot fly away. For a while he comes and he goes but eventually to keep, he locks his jaws on the stem and that way goes to sleep.

    And on the way he dreams of the things, of bees. While stretching his wings and kicking his legs he turns this way and that to indicate, he sees. The blue of a flower in bloom, a little nectar or pollen, a mate of his kind. Zooming in and out between the grasses and among the trees. God knows he will find.

    Dreaming in imagery a thinker could never know, the things a bee is and does. Making his home near enough to his kind, making it on the go.

    And all the while, he keeps his big eyes open for danger and, marvelously, knows no foe ...

    I have taken hundreds of shots of these Blue Banded Bees and only the once did he open his wings, to show. p1000815_markberkery.

    And did he find a mate? Or is it just a friend. Whichever, 'tis not the end. p1000847_markberkery.
     
    • Like Like x 22
  2. SMaturin

    SMaturin Mu-43 Veteran

    243
    Apr 30, 2011
    New York's Backyard
    Beautiful images, beautiful imagery in words!

    Fascinating creature. We have nothing like it over here. How big is it?

    Thanks.
    -Steve
     
    • Like Like x 1
  3. MarkB1

    MarkB1 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    546
    Oct 30, 2010
    Australia
    Thanks Steve. The adult is about 1/2 inch long. I think you have similar in the US, check here : https://attra.ncat.org/attra-pub/nativebee.html

     
  4. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    Those photos are great, Mark! That bee looks somehow beautiful in that first photo!
     
  5. sprinke

    sprinke Mu-43 All-Pro

    Apr 5, 2011
    Pasadena, CA
    Debi
    Is it normal for bees to sleep like that? I always thought they went back to a hive at night ...
     
  6. GaryAyala

    GaryAyala Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 2, 2011
    SoCal
    A photo is worth a thousand words ... but your words bring life to your images ...
    G
     
    • Like Like x 1
  7. KVG

    KVG Banned User

    May 10, 2011
    yyc(Calgary, AB)
    Kelly Gibbons
    fantastic photos, very impressive :^)
     
  8. m43_user

    m43_user Mu-43 Regular

    143
    Aug 4, 2010
    Which lens was that? I see on the first image the EXIF data says 35mm, but which lens specifically was it? Great photos :) Love 'em.

    Date Time Original 2011:05:05 16:38:52
    Exposure Time 1/160
    F Number 14
    Exposure Program Manual
    ISO Speed Ratings 100
    Metering Mode CenterWeightedAverage
    Flash Flash fired, compulsory flash mode
    Focal Length 35
    White Balance Auto white balance
    Make Panasonic
    Model DMC-G1
     
  9. dapipoy

    dapipoy Mu-43 Regular

    76
    Mar 31, 2011
    midlands, uk
    interesting! looks like a native lens if that exif (see f number) was untouched.
     
  10. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    My guess is the Zuiko 35mm macro, with Four-Thirds adapter. :) Am I right, Mark?
     
  11. KVG

    KVG Banned User

    May 10, 2011
    yyc(Calgary, AB)
    Kelly Gibbons
    This thread is the bees knees:tongue:
     
    • Like Like x 1
  12. MarkB1

    MarkB1 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    546
    Oct 30, 2010
    Australia
    Thanks Ned, he sure is ...

     
  13. MarkB1

    MarkB1 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    546
    Oct 30, 2010
    Australia
    It's normal for some bee to sleep like this. The Aussie stingless bee has a hive to go back to but most of the other 1,500 or so species are solitary or nomad/semi social and many of them roost rather than nest. Also varies between males and females.

     
  14. m43_user

    m43_user Mu-43 Regular

    143
    Aug 4, 2010
    Hmmm....no response to the question but he replied to other people about other things. I guess it's a secret ;-)
     
  15. MarkB1

    MarkB1 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    546
    Oct 30, 2010
    Australia
    Thanks KVG.

     
  16. MarkB1

    MarkB1 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    546
    Oct 30, 2010
    Australia
    Thanks m43. It's the Oly 35/3.5 digital. Would another register what FL it was? I don't know.

     
  17. MarkB1

    MarkB1 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    546
    Oct 30, 2010
    Australia
    Right you are Ned. Real close working distance. I prefer the 50/f2 now, with a Raynox on it, much sharper IMO.

     
  18. MarkB1

    MarkB1 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    546
    Oct 30, 2010
    Australia
    Hmmmm Hmmmmm.... (:)

    No secrets mate, just don't always have a decent connection to be able to get much done in one sitting before connection drops out.

    I use the Oly 4/3's 35/f3.5 and the 50/f2+achromat, mostly latter now. Sold the Panny 45/f2.8, no advantage for the money.

     
  19. AZK9lover

    AZK9lover Mu-43 Regular

    70
    Dec 25, 2010
    AZ, USA
    Stan
    Mark, I just stumbled onto this thread and saw your incredible photos and beautiful description of those bees. Then it dawned on me that you were describing this mysterious group of bees I saw in my yard last year... I couldn't figure out what they were doing- they were all huddled together in the breeze and seemingly frozen around dusk. It was such a strange sight that I haven't seen before so I went and snapped a couple of shots (these are nowhere near the amazing quality of your shots, but a decent representation of what I saw that evening). The next morning of course, they were gone and off to their routines.

    Thanks for finally shedding the light on what I saw that evening and on the life of these amazing creatures!

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Oly E-P1
     
  20. m43_user

    m43_user Mu-43 Regular

    143
    Aug 4, 2010
    LOL......ok. Thanks :) I was just wondering it it was a real 35mm or what the EXIF data thinks is the 35mm equivalent in the micro 4/3 lenses. The detail in the photos is rather impressive. I've never seen that type of bee so maybe it's not native to where I am.