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The Brenizer Method: Medium Format DoF with M4/3! (Or any cam =P)

Discussion in 'Native Lenses' started by napilopez, Jan 5, 2013.

  1. napilopez

    napilopez Contributing Editor

    826
    Feb 21, 2012
    NYC Area
    Napier Lopez
    So since I haven't seen it mentioned on this forum before, I thought I'd point out a technique commonly known as the Brenizer method for those who aren't aware of it. Basically, it's panorama stitching with a shallow DoF and/or telephoto lens. A "bokeh panorma", if you will.

    Although it can be quite time consuming, it really does produce some wonderful results if you have static subjects and background or have control over their movements. Or your subjects don't even have to be static if you can get them entirely in the first shot. It can basically make your photos look like wide angle super fast FF or medium format photos(besides being mega high resolution)

    Obviously this isn't super convenient, but if you ever have a shot you really want to do with shallow DoF at a wide angle of view and know you can't achieve that with M4/3, this is a great technique to try. I'd love to see someone try this with the 75mm f1.8. It's a great way to combine the intimacy of wide angle with the isolation of telephoto.

    Details here:

    The Brenizer Method Explained With Directions | San Francisco Bay Area Editorial Story-telling Wedding Photography

    Here is one shot I found with the E-M5 and 45mm f1.8:


    Olympus OM-D & Brenizer Method by jmcs36, on Flickr

    And here is one awesomely shot by the "creator" himself(make sure to read the story behind it on 500px):

    <table cellpadding="2"><tr><td style="border-bottom: 0px solid #fff;"><a href="http://500px.com/photo/2285428"> 4. "800" height="540" alt="Lemonade Out of Lemons by Ryan Brenizer (RyanBrenizer)) on 500px.com" border="0" style="margin: 0 0 5px 0;"></a><br/><font style="font-size: 120%;"><a href="http://500px.com/photo/2285428">Lemonade Out of Lemons</a> by <a href="http://500px.com/RyanBrenizer">Ryan Brenizer</a></font></td></tr></table>

    I haven't tried it yet, I had forgotten about it for a while but I definitely will be soon!
     
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  2. fluberman

    fluberman Mu-43 Top Veteran

    502
    Sep 19, 2012
    Indonesia
    Alex
    Thanks for reminding me about the Brenizer method. I haven't used this method for m4/3 cameras, but last year I shot with 4/3 camera (Oly E-620) and ZD 50mm. Considering that 4/3 and m4/3 have the same sensor size, you might expect a similar perspective then for m4/3.

    Below is some examples of the images I have. I don't remember how many images were stitched to create those.

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/flubie/6882473877/" title="Alone in the middle of a frozen lake by Flubie, on Flickr"> 6882473877_c487c7b263_b. "1024" height="438" alt="Alone in the middle of a frozen lake"></a>

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/flubie/6882471253/" title="Let's enjoy the snow by Flubie, on Flickr"> 6882471253_11ac4a9c29_z. "549" height="640" alt="Let's enjoy the snow"></a>
     
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  3. NJH

    NJH Mu-43 Regular

    164
    Mar 8, 2012
    South West England
    Wow thanks for posting about this certainly given me lots of new ideas.
     
  4. daimos

    daimos Mu-43 Veteran

    288
    Jun 23, 2010
    Ottawa,Ontario,Canada
    richard
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  5. napilopez

    napilopez Contributing Editor

    826
    Feb 21, 2012
    NYC Area
    Napier Lopez
  6. NJH

    NJH Mu-43 Regular

    164
    Mar 8, 2012
    South West England
    Forgive me but I think its easy to misinterpret the point of this method. It isn't to overcome DoF limitations and make a camera look like a different larger sensor camera, its to create something which is impossible otherwise, a perspective like a wide angle lens but with the DoF and compression from a short telephoto. Certainly interesting stuff but it seems crazy to me to stitch 20 or 30 images just to get more bokeh from m4/3. Couldn't one do that by just taking some OOF images and layering in photoshop?
     
  7. jloden

    jloden Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    May 15, 2012
    Hunterdon County, NJ
    Jay
    Well, that's what you'd get with a wide angle lens on a medium format or large format camera with shallower depth of field. So in a sense, it *is* about creating images that mimic the look of other formats. Ryan Brenizer in the B&H video on this topic even mentions using this with an APS-C camera to reproduce a FF camera look. It's also a way to create results to emulate lenses that don't exist on your system, or simply ones you can't afford (wide angle super-fast primes).

    Stitching the images versus layering (focus stacking the OOF areas) is to create a wider field of view from a long, fast lens used up close. Layering OOF areas wouldn't change your field of view, and it might or might not be possible to create the same effect from focus stacking depending on the exact lens, aperture, and distance to subject.
     
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  8. Crdome

    Crdome Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Sep 11, 2011
    West Central Indiana
    Chrome
    Napier -Thanks for starting the thread. I was unaware of the Brenizer Method. Love that shot of his.
     
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  9. Crdome

    Crdome Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Sep 11, 2011
    West Central Indiana
    Chrome
    Fluberman -Thanks for your examples
     
  10. RevBob

    RevBob Super Moderator

    Jun 4, 2011
    NorthWestern PA
    Bob
    I had forgotten about this, good to have a reminder. Thanks!