The best thing with Olympus

ac12

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Just want to mention that, um, remember the year 2000 problem? Any numbering scheme that uses the year really should have all 4 characters. Corporate America spent billions fixing that problem between about 1995 to 1999. Many uninformed people think it was a problem that didn't happen, but actually it was a real problem that was fixed in time because most mainframe programmers (like me) dropped everything and worked on that for 4 or 5 years. Not what I would call productivity!
I beat you.
I dealt with an inventory system that had a SINGLE digit for the year.
As a user if you saw 4, you did not know if it was 1974, 1984, 1994 :confused:

Background:
The system was designed WAY BACK when memory and storage were EXPENSIVE.
It was also designed back in the era when the industry expected to replace programs every 5-10 years. So a single digit year was not expected to be a problem, as they expected the system to be replaced before 10 years.
NO ONE expected that system would still be running 30+ years later.
 

ac12

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Just want to mention that, um, remember the year 2000 problem? Any numbering scheme that uses the year really should have all 4 characters. Corporate America spent billions fixing that problem between about 1995 to 1999. Many uninformed people think it was a problem that didn't happen, but actually it was a real problem that was fixed in time because most mainframe programmers (like me) dropped everything and worked on that for 4 or 5 years. Not what I would call productivity!
For industry you are absolutely correct.
We do not have the cost constraint for memory and storage, of the people that came before us.

But for individuals, how many of us will be alive and still taking pics in the year 2100?
Being still early in the century, we have many years to go before we hit Y2100.
The closer you get to the century point, the more of an issue it becomes.
 

RAH

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Being still early in the century, we have many years to go before we hit Y2100.
The closer you get to the century point, the more of an issue it becomes.
Yes, I agree, but if you have any feeling that immediate ancestors (sons and daughters) might be looking at you images, dates have a way of sneaking up on you. When I started programming in early 1970s, NO ONE worried about the year 2000, as @ac12 says - it was 30 years away; everything will change by then. Well, here we are 20 years after 2000 and I'll bet that a lot of the computer programs I worked on in the 70s and 80s are still running, doing mundane crap like sending out pay statements, sending taxes to the govt, etc, running every cycle, untouched by human hands. It's just prudent to prepare, IMHO.
 

ac12

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Yes, I agree, but if you have any feeling that immediate ancestors (sons and daughters) might be looking at you images, dates have a way of sneaking up on you. When I started programming in early 1970s, NO ONE worried about the year 2000, as @ac12 says - it was 30 years away; everything will change by then. Well, here we are 20 years after 2000 and I'll bet that a lot of the computer programs I worked on in the 70s and 80s are still running, doing mundane crap like sending out pay statements, sending taxes to the govt, etc, running every cycle, untouched by human hands. It's just prudent to prepare, IMHO.
This hits on another subject from a different angle.
How many of out image files will still be readable in 50+ years?
In 50 years, will they still be able to read JPG or brand specific RAW files?

I wonder if anyone has a program that will read the old Wordstar or VisiCalc files?
 

Bob in Pittsburgh

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To Rich's point, when the states were getting swamped with claims for unemployment compensation early in the pandemic, I saw several articles about how some of the programs were written in COBOL and that there aren't a lot of people still working who are fluent in COBOL.
 

ac12

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To Rich's point, when the states were getting swamped with claims for unemployment compensation early in the pandemic, I saw several articles about how some of the programs were written in COBOL and that there aren't a lot of people still working who are fluent in COBOL.
How many of the kids coming out of college even know any COBOL ?

Unfortunately, to the current generation, the older languages are "obsolete," and won't help them get a job, so they don't bother with them.

About 13 years ago, I recall dealing with a young IT guy who talked very disparigently about COBOL and all of the older procedure oriented languages. He said that SQL style languages are the future, and procedure languages were DEAD.
But when I gave him a file manipulation problem, he had no idea how to solve the problem with a database language, and made the excuse that he was "too busy" to help, and escaped.
It was very easy to solve with COBOL or even BASIC.
If he wasn't so short sighted and KNEW the database language, he could probably solve it with his database language.
 
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Replytoken

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Adobe Bridge and Lightroom both do renaming on import....I use Lightroom and YYYYMMDD-HHMMSS-XXX where 'XXX' is an incrementing number so if I shoot a series at 10 frames per second it will uniquely name them still. Have used that for ten years +.
Some cameras support subseconds, and some renaming programs will allow the subseconds to be used as renaming data: YYYYMMDD-HHMMSSss. I believe that Bridge may support subseconds, but I do not believe that LR's renaming does. Downloader Pro from Breeze Systems has a unique token system for subseconds similar to what you use.

--Ken
 

Replytoken

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I don't think any of the Olympus models do, at least not up to my E-M1.1?
I shoot with a number of bodies, including the E-M1 Mk I & II, but have not yet checked which generate subseconds. I was hoping that all of my camera bodies would as I often shoot bursts when shooting BIF or concerts and am in the process of changing my naming file template and wanted to incorporate the subseconds in the name. Instead, I am probably going to use the unique token that Downloader Pro offers since it can work with or without subseconds data.

--Ken
 
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Was he wearing a hat?
No, she wasn't ...

All Olympus cameras, at least for the last 20 years or so, have always used the ":ss" part, so not sure why you left it off, unless I am missing what you meant.
I was talking about the in-camera display. The E-M1 MkII displays the seconds, the E-M1 MkI does not.
 

PakkyT

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I was talking about the in-camera display. The E-M1 MkII displays the seconds, the E-M1 MkI does not.
Oh well that doesn't matter. That is just the display. For what we are talking about, the automatic renaming of files based on date and time from the exif data, is what does the EXIF include. So again, to the best of my knowledge, up to and including the E-M1.1, Olympus has never included sub-seconds in the file's exif.
 

c0ldc0ne

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YYMMDD would be as much as I would use. But that uses up 6 of the 8 characters in the file name, leaving only 2 characters for frame sequence. So that would not work on a camera that creates an 8.3 file name.
I think the working assumption was that you use a bare bones numbering system in camera, and supplement it during the copy/import process using the EXIF data and the far more lenient file naming restrictions of modern file systems and OS’s. This would yield uniquely named files, even if you keep them all in one directory (which of course would be ill-advised).
 

PhotoCal

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Darn, I thought this thread would be about Live Composite, the IBIS or many of the other Olympus features.

But if you enjoy the file numbering system go right ahead ...
 

c0ldc0ne

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The best part of Olympus is all their cameras taste like peppermint. You haven't licked your camera yet?
That reminded me of a classic Glasbergen cartoon.

Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)
 

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