tested a Nikon 200-400mm F4

Discussion in 'Adapted Lenses' started by walter_j, May 12, 2014.

  1. walter_j

    walter_j Mu-43 Veteran

    364
    Sep 10, 2013
    Hagwilget, B.C., Canada
    Walter
    I tested my brothers Nikon 200-400mm F4 Lens. It's awesome. My OM-D E-M5 looks ridiculous on this monster. I used a Fotodiox adapter, which makes the lens completely manual. A tripod was a must for this beast. I also included a shot taken with my Konica 135mm F3.2 for comparison.

    I can't justify this lens at $6,700, although the Olympus 4/3 300mm must be incredible too, at about the same price range.

    On a side note, Fotodiox made a mistake when I ordered a konica adapter, and sent a Nikon adapter instead. It took awhile to sort this out, and Fotoddiox eventually told me to keep the Nikon adapter, and sent the Konica adapter. Good service.
     

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  2. OzRay

    OzRay Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 29, 2010
    South Gippsland, Australia
    Ray, not Oz
    That becomes a very long focal length lens and you can see the loss of contrast that you get at the very long end. How much of the lens barrel did you manage to cover with the flash? :wink:
     
  3. walter_j

    walter_j Mu-43 Veteran

    364
    Sep 10, 2013
    Hagwilget, B.C., Canada
    Walter
    I never tested the flash. The loss of contrast was noticeable, but the image was pretty sharp I think. I picked up a vivitar 135mm f2.8 for $27.00 last week, and sold my konica 135 that I used on the wide shot. The 135mm lenses are a nice length: contrast seems to drop off quick above this length. I have a konica 200 F3.5, and I'm not that happy with it. The Konica 200 isn't very sharp, has lots of CA, and contrast is not great. I'm looking for something better. I seen some nice images from a Canon 200mm here I think
     
  4. OzRay

    OzRay Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 29, 2010
    South Gippsland, Australia
    Ray, not Oz
    One of the issues with very long focal length lenses and shooting distant objects is atmospheric effects. You lose a lot of contrast, sometimes detail, because the atmosphere will act like a poor filter over your lens. There's not a lot that you can do about it and it's questionable whether even UV filters would help to any great degree.
     
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