Telephoto or long lens for EM1 2

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Really a crap situation. Sorry to hear about this.

I've actually found that sometimes with the 5.2 I'll turn on the camera but the lens isn't latched all the way. This was due to the way I hold the body and hit the lens release button. Thankfully I haven't experienced this with the 1.2, yet. Although I do echo that I think the 1.2 buttons are much more squishy than the 5.2 buttons; I do miss the tactile response of the 5.2.

Is 300mm to 400mm really that big of a difference? It's too bad that I see that you don't want the 300/4 + tc1.4. I think that would be the logical step for you. Better reach and (expectedly) better iq at 300mm AND 400mm.
I priced the 300 this morning $4400. $2200 when I bought the Panasonic late last year!

End of financial year sales imminent. Not sure what that means.

AC12 I'd thought same as you re a cover.
But I've also devised (in mind) a strap linking the two mounting screws for tripod base plate. Doesn't worry me they're another thing to undo if I need to change the lens. That doesn't happen unless I drop the lot 😩
 

Ross the fiddler

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Why not go with the 300mm pro, with your 1.4 TC you'd be at 420, a bit faster and I'd think maybe a bit sharper that the Panny at 400. Plus you would have dual IS with your EM-1.2 which works very well. I have both lenses and think the Olympus focuses a little faster too.

I have also had lenses fall off my em-1 mk2, both the 300 and the 40-150 pro. All but once they were in my hands. The one time I was out with the 40-150 and went to take a pic and the lens came apart from the body. I put it back on and made sure that it had clicked in and would not come off and about 20 min. later it fell off on a gravel path. Luckily it landed on the hood and nothing broke, just a few small scratches. I wonder too if I'm hitting the lens release button as I'm walking

Neil
It must have something to do with your bag arrangement & the release button getting pressed in the bag. I would investigate doing something different with your bag so there is no chance of the button getting pressed in at all. I've never had a lens come loose, only the lens hood on the 12-40 f2.8 lens. I cut the release knob on the hood back with that problem gone since (I have to press it in now to release it).
 

Neil_jo

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My main issue is the way I carry my gear. If a lens has a tripod foot that's where the camera strap is attached and I walk with my right hand cradling the lens barrel close to the camera. I think I'm inadvertently hitting the lens release button and with the jostling of walking the lens is coming loose. But I do think that the release button on my EM-1.2 is way too easy to push and I don't even need to push it in all the way to release the lens.

Neil
 

Hendrik

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My main issue is the way I carry my gear. If a lens has a tripod foot that's where the camera strap is attached and I walk with my right hand cradling the lens barrel close to the camera. I think I'm inadvertently hitting the lens release button and with the jostling of walking the lens is coming loose. But I do think that the release button on my EM-1.2 is way too easy to push and I don't even need to push it in all the way to release the lens.

Neil
My guess is that Olympus would argue that this is a feature, not a bug. The design seems to be constant through the E-M1 line. It's certainly something that one might need to learn to live with. My own experience has been that it is indeed possible for the human to accommodate the camera when the reverse is not likely. ;)
 

ac12

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The lens release button is a problem with two sides, and neither will please the other.
  • To make changing lens easy and fast, the cost is to give up some security.
    • If you want to make the lens easy and fast to remove, the button is above the collar, so that it can be pressed with the same hand that is removing the lens.
  • To make it hard to accidentally remove the lens, you have to make the lens harder (more deliberate) to remove.
    • If you want to make the lens hard to accidentally remove, then you lower the button so that it is below the collar. You need to then press the button in with your left hand as you turn the lens with your right.
    • Or you use a different mechanism that requires the use of two hands to unlock and remove the lens.
I'll take the first option.
IMHO, done right and used right, after 40+ years of using a Nikon F, it works just fine.

To market into the pro world, the camera mfg has to make the camera easy and fast to use.
A 2-handed operation is not easy and fast to use.

Maybe the solution is an optional collar that can be attached to the front of the camera, around the lens release button.
  • Don't use the collar, and you can remove the lens with one hand.
  • Use the collar, and you have to use the left hand to press the lens release button, as you turn the lens with your right.
 

ac12

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My guess is that Olympus would argue that this is a feature, not a bug. The design seems to be constant through the E-M1 line. It's certainly something that one might need to learn to live with. My own experience has been that it is indeed possible for the human to accommodate the camera when the reverse is not likely. ;)
The Olympus design is also consistent with both Nikon and Canon SLRs, dSLRs, and mirrorless.
 

Hendrik

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The Olympus design is also consistent with both Nikon and Canon SLRs, dSLRs, and mirrorless.
Indeed. It matches my experience of my Nikons (D300, D600, D7100) with this difference: the larger cameras have more real estate between the corner of the camera and the button. The compactness of the m43 bodies and the resulting movement of the lens mount further from the center toward the left (to render the right-hand grip more secure and comfortable) makes it more necessary for the user to be careful to avoid the lens release button. Compactness cuts both ways.
 

ac12

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Indeed. It matches my experience of my Nikons (D300, D600, D7100) with this difference: the larger cameras have more real estate between the corner of the camera and the button. The compactness of the m43 bodies and the resulting movement of the lens mount further from the center toward the left (to render the right-hand grip more secure and comfortable) makes it more necessary for the user to be careful to avoid the lens release button. Compactness cuts both ways.
I think same is happening on the FF mirrorless.
But in that case, I think the grip + larger lens mount and minimized camera size is pushing the location of the lens release button further to the side.
These two pics of the Nikon Z7 and Canon R5 show the lens release buttons located as far to right edge of the camera (viewed from the front) as it can possibly be.

This pic of a Z7 shows the lens release button practically on the right edge of the camera.
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And this pic of the Canon R shows the lens release button similarly on the right edge of the camera.
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I found this interesting pic of a Canon R5.
It appears to me that Canon put the lens release button into a slight depression. hmmm
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On a pro camera, Canon must have tested that design, for ease of use.
 

hoggdoc

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Huh, that's odd. I have never had a lens fall off any of my Olympus cameras both with 4/3rds and m43rds systems over several models and mabe 12 years. But it is interesting you both had it happen and both of you use the E-M1.2. Could the mark2 have a flaw or weakness not present in other bodies?
Good question, was thinking the same thing.
 

ac12

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I'm curious how you can change a lens one handed?
How do you hold the lens, depress the button and detach /attach a lens and hold the camera all one handed?
Go to post 20, I describe it there.
Right hand removes the lens, puts it into the case, pulls out the next lens, and puts it on.
I push the camera back against my body, so I do not need the left hand to hold the camera.

Having said that, it requires a LOT of practice, to do it easily and safely.
I've done it 40+ years on a Nikon, so I hardly even think about changing a Nikon lens. And that carried over to the Olympus.

As I mentioned, it also depends on the specific camera. Examples:
I can one-hand the Olympus EM1 and EM10, Nikon SLR and dSLR, a Canon T5, T7, and 90D.​
I am pretty sure that I cannot one-hand a Minolta SRT-101, definitely not a Pentax thread mount, and very probably not a Hasselblad 500c/m. The old Canon breech lock is a maybe, it's been too long.​
 
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Yes I'd seen that thanks. But missed your hold to body!

My suggestion with a ring or lip around the button means you can poke in there to release then do what's required.
It's a direct jab into the button which is natural IMO with regards to holding lens.

Whilst user error is always an inherent problem I don't hold to that theory and not consider improvements.
It's how we've got to where we are today. Advances would stagnate if "user error" was given for reasons as opposed to how things can be improved, made safer etc.

I'd suggest this could be overcome and still give quick and easy one handed if that's industry requirement.
 
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Update. Lens a write-off. I purchased a new one on a very good price.
Put back on my EM1 2 along with a connecting strap that gives me peace of mind.
Made of harness leather, tough as nails.
I have no desire to change lenses, but easy to do with a coin or other flat ended object.
Has added attribute of "softening" the grip.
I use the tripod bracket to carry the device by, with the camera strap wrapped around my wrist.
 

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