Telephoto conversion lens?

Discussion in 'Accessories' started by redock, Jul 27, 2014.

  1. redock

    redock New to Mu-43

    Jul 27, 2014
    I have an Olympus 40-150 for my EM-5. On rare occasion I want to go beyond the 150mm range. While one option is the digital teleconverter in the camera, I am exploring purchasing a telephoto conversion lens as another option.

    There are three models I have seen discussion about:
    - Olympus TCON-17 (1.7x)
    - Raynox DCR-1540Pro (1.54x)
    - Raynox DCR-2025Pro (2.2x)

    All provide the magnification I am after. What I want to make sure of is that the image quality holds. In that regard, the TCON-17 seems to get the best reviews.

    One downside on the TCON - its back thread size is 55mm, whereas the front thread on the 40-150 is 58mm, so I will need to use a step-down ring.

    Downside aside, any thoughts on using the TCON-17 with an EM-5 and/or the 40-150 lens?
  2. dougjgreen

    dougjgreen Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 5, 2013
    San Diego
    Real Name:
    Doug Green
    As a general rule, these add-on converters are a bit of a crapshoot, unless they were designed for the specific lens that they are being used on. And there is none that has been designed for use on the 40-150mm lens. That being said, whichever one you get might work very well. It also might deliver garbage results.

    My point in saying this is, be sure you don't spend too much on this sort of a solution, because there's a more than slight chance the end results will not live up to your expectations, and you might end up selling whatever you buy - hopefully not at a big loss.

    I actually just did an experiment with add-on wide converters to be added to a Nikon 1 10mm lens (and possibly also the Panasonic 14mm lens here in this system - I'm waiting for a 46-43 step down ring to arrive to know if it works on this lens as well). I bought a half dozen of these converters, but I only spent between $7 and $25 for each of them - as these sort of add-on converters often sell for very little on ebay. The net result was that one converter was quite good, two were marginally useable, and 3 were not really useable at all. In this case, the experiment worked, because I found 1 converter that provided quite good results on the specific lens I was looking to widen the field on. But if none of them were any good, I'd have spent about $70 for naught - which wouldn't have been a disaster because I kept the costs for each one to a minimum. And in fact, I've subsequently sold two of the converters that go for the highest prices - but which did not give me useable results on the specific lens I was trying to adapt, for about $75 total, thus recouping my initial investment.

    Here's a link to my experiment that I reported on the companion site

    The two converters that I subsequently sold to recoup the costs of the exercise were the Sony VCL-MHG07 0.7x and the Raynox DCR-6600 0.66x HD