Technological dead end

Discussion in 'Street, Documentary, and Portrait' started by mauve, Apr 5, 2011.

  1. mauve

    mauve Mu-43 Top Veteran

    Mar 9, 2010
    Paris, France
    A couple of weeks ago, all TV broadcast switched from analog to DVB in Paris region, and ultimately by the end of this year, all the country will be covered by digital broadcasting.

    This made almost all tube-based TV redundant one night at the flick of a switch, and although some cheap DVB adapters are available, many people seized the occasion to dump their old TV in favor of a new flat panel LCD one (and of course, DVB compatible). So overnight, the streets were littered with old TV sets, and this 'gift' was immediately harvested by homeless seeking the huge amount of copper wires inside. Amazingly, since switch day, the dumping has been continuous and seems endless. The scene is almost reminiscent of a mini guerilla war, with hundreds of TV shells ripped opened and broken tubes.

    <table style="width:auto;"><tr><td><a href="">[​IMG]"603" width="800" /></a></td></tr><tr><td style="font-family:arial,sans-serif; font-size:11px; text-align:right">De <a href="">OLYMPUS E-P1</a></td></tr></table>

    Do you have pictures of others once 'en vogue' technology now made redundant and scrapped ?

    • Like Like x 4
  2. mauve

    mauve Mu-43 Top Veteran

    Mar 9, 2010
    Paris, France
    More of the same

    <table style="width:auto;"><tr><td><a href="">[​IMG]"602" width="800" /></a></td></tr><tr><td style="font-family:arial,sans-serif; font-size:11px; text-align:right">De <a href="">OLYMPUS E-P1</a></td></tr></table>
    • Like Like x 3
  3. Amin Sabet

    Amin Sabet Administrator

    Apr 10, 2009
    Boston, MA (USA)
    That is striking. We had a similar switch day, but I think it was pretty uneventful. I remember the government giving out some sort of adapter to make the old TVs work with the new broadcasting. Maybe that made the difference?
  4. mauve

    mauve Mu-43 Top Veteran

    Mar 9, 2010
    Paris, France
    I don't think so. As I mentioned, inexpensive adapters were available. Not free, but real cheap. I think it's more a cultural question. We french, statistically, are quite conservatives. We are seldom early adopters of unproven technologies. We were for instance at the bottom of the european union in term of broadband Internet access until year 2K, and while most germans already enjoyed ISDN connectivity, we were mostly still on dialup.

    And the tendency reversed in less than a year, and today you'd be hard pressed to find even "slow" ADSL anywhere, while others were stagnating into older technologies like ISDN. When we switch, well, it's a group thing... and almost instant. But we wait until the new fangled tech has become mature and mainstream.

  5. Amin Sabet

    Amin Sabet Administrator

    Apr 10, 2009
    Boston, MA (USA)
    Very interesting. I was also surprised that there was enough copper wire in there to make it worth the trouble of getting it out.
  6. Iconindustries

    Iconindustries Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Amin, there's actually a fair bit of copper wire in the induction coils that sit around the cone at the rear of the CRT. These are the coils that direct the electrons to where they are supposed to be on the front screen.
  7. GaryAyala

    GaryAyala Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 2, 2011
    I do remember our switch ... no streets lined with non-digital Tvs, as I remember. Le fran├žais est si ... fran├žais.
    • Like Like x 1
  8. Kade.Sirin

    Kade.Sirin Mu-43 Regular

    Sep 23, 2010
    Las Vegas
    I believe that when you're down to pretty much nothing, anything to earn a bit of cash is worth the trouble.
  9. lenshoarder

    lenshoarder Mu-43 All-Pro

    Nov 7, 2010
    As Amin said, in the US the government gave away the adapters. Even today, you don't need an adapter since cable TV is still analog. So old CRT TVs still have a market, when I cruise thrift stores for cameras/lens, I see that they still do a decent business in CRT TVs. Not that they are worth a lot. I have a old 36" CRT HDTV from 10 years ago. It was a $2000 TV. 4 years I tried to sell it for $200. No takers. Now it's rotting in storage.

    About 5 years ago, I was picking up Macs on the street. Mainly G4s. They worked perfectly fine but people would leave them out on trash day. Which is quite illegal in California due to the toxic waste disposal laws. I would only take the ones that looked like they would work. The neighborhood kids would strip them of the RAM and HDs then meet up at the local comic bookstore to trade.
  10. Trigeek

    Trigeek Mu-43 Regular

    Actually, we should be glad that this is happening. It's green, there is a fair bit of nasty stuff in monitors and TV's that if put in a landfill will leach out into the ground. A lot of the material in a TV is very recyclable.
  11. Luckypenguin

    Luckypenguin .

    Oct 9, 2010
    Brisbane, Australia
    Real Name:
    Mauve, great images. That would be surreal to have all those old TVs lying about.