Tasmanian Native Orchids

nickthetasmaniac

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This will hopefully be a long-running thread documenting my (rather ambitious) project to find and photograph all of Tasmania's native orchid species*.

Tassie is home to about 200 individual species and a number of hybrids, although the total varies as new species are discovered and old species are consolidated. For the time being, lets say there's 217. About one third of these are endemic to the State.

They're found across most parts of the state, from coastal scrub to grasslands to cool-temperate rainforest to montane areas, and there are species in flower during every month of the year (with a distinct peak in Oct-Dec). Some are prolific (such as the Mayfly below) while some are very elusive, and only flower under very specific environmental conditions (such as the bushfire dependent Fire Orchid).

For anyone used to the big tropical hybrids you find in commercial florists, Tasmanian orchids range from small to very small (the smallest having flowers only a few mm's across).

I mainly use a Pen F and m.ZD 60mm Macro for my orchid photos, although some of the earlier ones were shot with an EM5 or Ricoh GRII.

*Quite possible the internet won't exist by the time I finish :biggrin:

I'm also sharing this project on IG @_orchidism

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Thelymitra simulata (Collared Sun Orchid) | Tasman National Park (Pen F + 60mm Macro)

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Prasophyllum apoxychillum
(Tapered Leek Orchid) | Tasman National Park (GRII)

Endemic to Tasmania and listed as 'endangered'.

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Acianthus caudatus
(Mayfly Orchid) | Tasman National Park (GRII)
 
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nickthetasmaniac

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These are two of the three Tasmanian members of the Pterostylis longifolia complex. Visually the only reliable way to tell the difference is the amount of dark colouring on the labellum, or 'tongue'.

The third member of this group is the endemic Pterostylis stenochila (Green-lip Greenhood), whose labellum is all-green with no colouring at all. I have found P. stenochila, but I'm yet to get a good image...

When an insect lands on the labellum it snaps shut, holding the insect inside long enough for pollination to occur before slowly releasing (same process as a trigger plant).

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Pterostylis melagramma (Black-stripe Greenhood) | Tasman National Park (Pen F and m.ZD 60mm Macro)

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Pterostylis willliamsonii
(Brown-lip Greenhood) | Tasman National Park (Pen F and m.ZD 60mm Macro)

Endemic to Tasmania.
 

nickthetasmaniac

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Thelymitra cyanea (Veined Sun Orchid) | Tasman National Park (EM5 and Super-Macro-Takumar 50/f4)

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Thelymitra rubra (Pink Sun Orchid) | Tasman National Park (Pen F and m.ZD 60mm Macro)
 
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