'Take Control: Sharpening In Photoshop'

Discussion in 'Image Processing' started by RT_Panther, Nov 25, 2012.

  1. RT_Panther

    RT_Panther Mu-43 Legend

    May 4, 2011
    Texas
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  2. savvy

    savvy Mu-43 Top Veteran

    714
    Sep 28, 2012
    SE Essex, UK
    Les
    Thanks RTP, another good find, and another one bookmarked !! :biggrin: :thumbup:
     
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  3. Crdome

    Crdome Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Sep 11, 2011
    West Central Indiana
    Chrome
    Thanks for posting this useful procedure. -Chrome
     
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  4. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    Yes, this is the standard method of post-process sharpening we use in the design industry. I have it as an Action in Photoshop, with 50% opacity on the high-pass layer because I don't like to overdue it.

    *EDIT: Actually, reading the article through more I see that it deviates a bit from the standard methodology. Normally this is done with the "Soft Light" blending option but this article uses "Overlay". I don't know how much difference that would make. Perhaps one day I'll try testing and comparing those two layer options. They do mention the opacity adjustment, however.

    I don't know any professional Photoshop user (ie, designer, retoucher, etc.) who would use Unsharp Mask to sharpen an image. Most all will use a method like described above.

    Another thing many may not know is how to "properly" (I use quotes because I'm not trying to suggest that the "industry standard" is the only correct way of doing things) convert to B/W. We don't just convert to Greyscale, we use the Channel Mixer to convert to Monochrome (with the checkbox) then go from there to mix each color channel into your new greyscale image the way you want.
     
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  5. speedandstyle

    speedandstyle Mu-43 Hall of Famer