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Switching to Lightroom CC from Aperture, need help

Discussion in 'Image Processing' started by rmcnelly, Oct 14, 2015.

  1. rmcnelly

    rmcnelly Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 21, 2015
    Portsmouth, VA
    I'm trying out Lightroom CC (switching from Aperture), and am a little lost about how things are organized. In Aperture, everything was in the same place, and I would import pics to a Project file.

    Lightroom keeps the pics in a different file system, using Catalogs, Folders where the actual pics are kept (I think), and Collections. I've imported my Aperture pics which show up as Projects in Collections, but the actual photos are stored in a different location within Folders.

    I usually take morning pics and add them to an Aperture Project named Morning. I thought I had selected the Morning Project/Collection when importing some pics from the SD card, but they didn't appear there and I had to drag them in from the Previous Import Catalog.

    I've figured out how to install the Nik Plugins which I love to use.

    Can you guys refer me to a good online tutorial to help me wrap my head around the file system/workflow?

    I'm hoping using Lightroom CC could save me some space on my SSD, sharing directly to Flickr and Facebook, where in Aperture I had to export pics and then upload them (potentially doubling disk space used).
     
  2. manju69

    manju69 Mu-43 Veteran

    493
    Jul 1, 2011
    Stroud, UK
    Pete
    Hi. I made the same move about 6 months ago maybe. I can't answer exactly your questions but I can say I really researched the topic before. In the end I used a bit of software called "aperture exporter" It worked very well. My aperture library was not referenced -i.e. I imported all my images into its integrated system (this is called a managed library) so this software exports all my aperture projects as actual folders with the same name on my hard drive. When I open up Lightroom, it found the folders and hey presto-the same structure was there. Lightroom only works as a reference library so you may need to get used to that way of working.

    I read a lot of sites saying don't use the Lightroom import feature as it creates loads of folders if you use a managed library on aperture. This is because aperture stores imported images in a new folder for every day or something like that = loads of folders!

    The other thing to realize is that any edits made on aperture will not easily migrate to Lightroom - even simple crops. Unless you either export them individually or this software I mentioned can help you by exporting them as a folder -but this uses up more disc space. This is a pain.

    Overall it was a bit of a steep learning curve to do the migration but it was worth taking my time with back ups at every stage. I miss the simplicity of aperture but Lightroom is fine once you get to know it.

    There are many sites that explain this switch but I don't have the links saved anymore. Sorry.

    I hope that helps!
     
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  3. tradesmith45

    tradesmith45 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Dec 13, 2012
    Oregon
    Making the same transition - like you painfully. Not sure which is worse Apple abandoning Aperture or Adobe's unstable updates???? A surprising amount of Lightroom commands are hidden unless you know they are there like right clicking the Folders Panel to get "add folder" instead of being under the File menu. PS is like this too. There's logic here but takes a bit to catch on.

    I bought the lightroomqueen.com's book (electronic or physical). Its pretty good for me. And there's a ton of stuff on YouTube.

    Make sure you can't do what you want in Photos 'cause its a pretty good light duty cataloguer & image editor w/ more to come.

     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. rmcnelly

    rmcnelly Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 21, 2015
    Portsmouth, VA
    Thanks Peter, especially about aperture exporter.
     
  5. rmcnelly

    rmcnelly Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 21, 2015
    Portsmouth, VA
    Thanks tradesmith45, I've downloaded the free eBook from Lightroomqueen, and will research youtube.
     
  6. David A

    David A Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 30, 2011
    Brisbane, Australia
    Aperture gave you the option of a managed database or a referenced files option. The difference is this:

    - the managed database stored your actual image data along with all of the editing information for each image in the database structure. If you went searching your hard drive you would never find a folder holding your original image files.

    - the referenced files option placed your image files in a normal folder in a location you specified and kept a link ( the "reference") to each image file along with the editing information for each image in the Aperture database structure.

    As far as processing your images and exporting copies of processed images went, there was no obvious difference between the two approaches.


    So, Lightroom uses a referenced database approach. Your image files are stored in a normal folder structure on your hard drive and the Lightroom Catalogue is Lightroom's equivalent of the Aperture database. The catalogue file is where Lightroom stores all your editing data. Collections are like a "virtual folder". When you add a file to a collection, the image file doesn't move and no copy is created. All that happens is that the Lightroom Catalogue stores data about the existence of the collection and the files that you add to the collection so when you open the collection in the Library module, Lightroom just assembles thumbnails for all of the images you've added to the collection from the list relating to the collection which it stores in your Lightroom Catalogue. There is no managed database option with Lightroom.

    Basically you choose where to store image files on import when you import files from your camera's SD card. Since you're used to importing into projects in Aperture, you can regard the folder structure your images are stored in as being equivalent to your project structure in Aperture and collections in Lightroom as being something like albums in Aperture.

    Once you get used to the way Lightroom manages your files you'll be fine but I found it a little confusing when I moved from Aperture to Lightroom around 3 years ago. At that stage there were no options in Lightroom for importing an Aperture photo library into Lightroom so if you were using Aperture's managed database option as I was, first you had to move your files out of the Aperture database into a folder structure and have Aperture create the references to that structure so that you could still access your edited images in Aperture, and then you had to tell Lightroom to import the images in that folder structure into the Lightroom library/catalogue. Doing that was a lot messier and more hands on than it is now since Adobe created an Aperture library import utility which essentially automates that whole process.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  7. rmcnelly

    rmcnelly Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 21, 2015
    Portsmouth, VA
    Thanks David A.,

    Everyone's input has been helpful.
     
  8. rmcnelly

    rmcnelly Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 21, 2015
    Portsmouth, VA
    I deleted my previous import and used Aperture Exporter. My first attempt didn't work well as I didn't pay attention to the star rating settings, so I did it over and got wonderful results! It converted my Aperture edits to separate jpgs, kept the original RAW files, and kept my Project folders the same.

    Thank you again, this really worked great!

    Now I just need to import pics from the SD card to the correct place, and I should be good to go.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  9. manju69

    manju69 Mu-43 Veteran

    493
    Jul 1, 2011
    Stroud, UK
    Pete
    I am glad it helped. It's a nifty piece of software and really made the whole move easy. Still learning how to use Lightroom though...!
     
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  10. mcasan

    mcasan Mu-43 All-Pro

    Feb 26, 2014
    Atlanta
    • Appreciate Appreciate x 1
  11. rmcnelly

    rmcnelly Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 21, 2015
    Portsmouth, VA