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Stupid battery question

Discussion in 'Accessories' started by gardengirl13, Jul 31, 2014.

  1. gardengirl13

    gardengirl13 Mu-43 Veteran

    200
    Jun 26, 2012
    US
    OK I got my OMD in July 2012, instead of waiting for the OEM batteries, since everyone was on back order, I got the 2 pack Wasabi batteries and they worked great until 2 months ago when they won't hold a charge. I'm waiting to get my replacements from Blue Nook since it's only been 2 years. But I'm worried about them having issues in the future, so as another option I bought an OEM battery as a third backup, just in case.

    I just opened the box this morning and it has a date code of 2012-11. This battery is almost as old as my original. Now I know it'll probably work ok. But given battery life and how much I use it/charge it etc... Should I return it and ask for a newer one? Buying something from one of the big retailers and having it be this old (especially when at that time of year in 2012 they were VERY hard to find OEM batteries) it makes me worry slightly that this was a return or sitting on some shelf somewhere and might not have as good of a life as a 2014 battery would. I wasn't going to buy it, but I am not wanting to stress about the Wasabis as much. They'll be fine but if they do have issues I want an extra backup.

    So should I exchange this and ask for one with a new date, or return it and just deal with the Wasabis and maybe get another 2 pack just to be safe? For the price I could buy 4 of them.
     
  2. scott2hot

    scott2hot Mu-43 Veteran

    318
    Aug 27, 2012
    west yorkshire
    scott
    I wouldnt worry too much by date on battery...in my company we have 12v batteries that on constant trickle charge that have run since mid nineties and still hold good charge /output ampage...you must really be be charging and using your OEM batts to wear them out ...use the two OEM batteries and keep the wasabi as third option.Like everything nowadays ...date mearly there for point of reference.
     
  3. gardengirl13

    gardengirl13 Mu-43 Veteran

    200
    Jun 26, 2012
    US
    The original OEM battery is fine. It doesn't hold a charge like it used to, but it still works very well, it's only very slightly noticeablely shorter time. It's the Wasabi that are now toast. I plan on using the replacements they send me, if they'll ever call back, as my third backups.

    It's more so I thought I heard a rumor, yeah I know I know don't listen to rumors, that these batteries are only good for 3-4 years. That's why I was concerned. Heck I had a battery for my old Canon A1 last me 20+ years!!! And I really used that camera a lot! Of course that was not a rechargeable.
     
  4. Replytoken

    Replytoken Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    May 7, 2012
    Puget Sound
    Ken
    My refurbished cameras often came from Olympus with slightly older batteries and I have not had any issues with them to date. Most have been from 2011 and 2012.

    --Ken
     
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  5. gardengirl13

    gardengirl13 Mu-43 Veteran

    200
    Jun 26, 2012
    US
    great! I guess I'll just keep it.
     
  6. Lawrence A.

    Lawrence A. Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 14, 2012
    New Mexico
    Larry
    Stupid battery!!
     
  7. gardengirl13

    gardengirl13 Mu-43 Veteran

    200
    Jun 26, 2012
    US
    not stupid battery stupid question
     
  8. Ricoh

    Ricoh Mu-43 Top Veteran

    906
    Nov 2, 2013
    UK
    Steve
    Not a stupid question at all, a question many of us have asked without a satisfactory answer.

    From the net:
    Do not leave the battery dormant for long periods of time. The article recommends using the battery at least once every two to three weeks. If a battery has not been used for a long period of time, perform the new battery break in procedure described as follows:

    New batteries come in a discharged condition and must be fully charged before use. It is recommended that you fully charge and discharge the new battery two to four times to allow it to reach its maximum rated capacity.

    Another question I have, is it best to fully charge a battery each time, or perform a partial charge following a partial discharge. I've read that cycling between 40 and 80% is the best strategy. Continued charging from say 5% to 100% will provide something like 1000 cycles before 'death' but the partial charge / discharge will reward with a greater number of cycles, 5x or 10x.
    Need answers from a battery scientist, anyone?
     
  9. gardengirl13

    gardengirl13 Mu-43 Veteran

    200
    Jun 26, 2012
    US
    I always fully charge batteries. The hard part is if you have say 4 of them and can't rotate and use them within 2-3 weeks would it be better to not charge one of the new wasabis coming and just keep three of them in rotation for now? I do mark them with a sharpie so I know what's been used or not. Basically just number them and use in order. Unless I know i need it for something the next day and can charge it a head of time I always use a battery until the camera reads it's dead. Then charge it to 100% again. If i need it for a day long thing I charge everyone the night before.

    Now here is one question for people...

    Is it better to store (say for a month or so) a fully charged battery, or keep it "dead" and then charge it when you need it the next day or something? Will it hurt it's life one way or another???
     
  10. Ricoh

    Ricoh Mu-43 Top Veteran

    906
    Nov 2, 2013
    UK
    Steve
    I always run the battery down and replace when the battery symbol showing in the display goes red.
    I don't think its practical to run 40 to 80% as suggested.
    If storing, it's best to do so with approx 60% charge, I'm told, not 100%, but why I'm not sure. It's chemistry.
    Really nice flower photies by the way!
     
    • Like Like x 1
  11. Lawrence A.

    Lawrence A. Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 14, 2012
    New Mexico
    Larry
    I know. I couldn't pass up a chance to play with the linguistic ambiguity.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  12. Replytoken

    Replytoken Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    May 7, 2012
    Puget Sound
    Ken
    I am not sure of the optimal level, but IIRC, it is not advisable to store lithium batteries "dead".

    --Ken
     
  13. beameup

    beameup Mu-43 Regular

    104
    Oct 23, 2013
    I got a pair of generic batteries before I even received my E-M1. I got them off ebay for less than $20
    and they've worked as good as the OEM for 9 months now. They work just great in the OEM battery
    charger. I do have to frequently switch batteries with this camera.
     
  14. Bif

    Bif Mu-43 Veteran

    380
    May 28, 2012
    San Angelo TX
    Bruce Foreman
    I've had very poor luck with Wasabi batteries. Ordered a pair with charger for my Olympus Pen and didn't get 4 charge/use cycles out of either one of them. One swelled up inside the camera battery compartment and took over two hours to pry out, lucky the camera didn't get damaged. The other simply "died" never to take a charge again. I immediately ordered a spare genuine Olympus battery and that and the original are still working 2 years later.

    At the same time I also ordered a pair and charger for my GH2s. While they gave no real problems I never did get more than a fraction of the runtime of genuine Lumix batteries. I finally sent them to a guy who needed spares so I wouldn't accidentally count on them for an important "take".

    Recently, against my better judgement I ordered a pair of batteries with charger for my GX7 from an amazon vendor. Everybody was out of the "real thing". The batteries turned out to be Power2000 but the charger was some name I'd never heard of and happened to be for a totally different battery. I could have sent the whole setup back for a refund but I was in bind and needed the batteries, the vendor would not even answer queries about replacing the charger with the correct one.

    Amazon couldn't help but eventually gave me a $10 credit on amazon.

    So the only way I'll consider 3rd party batteries anymore will be those sold through B&H, usually Watson.

    But for the most part I'll order genuine OEM.
     
  15. scott2hot

    scott2hot Mu-43 Veteran

    318
    Aug 27, 2012
    west yorkshire
    scott
    Put into context...if they say regardless of what % you top up or discharge a battery...1000 life cycles = 3 years or there about charging every day!...i would worry about shutter life first than £20 battery.Should one need so many recharges per week!
    My dewalt hammer drill gets recharged daily and run out daily...between the original and spare used 200? days a year (mon-fri) x 5 years...pretty good going if you ask me i got my monies worth!
     
  16. barry13

    barry13 Super Moderator; Photon Wrangler

    Mar 7, 2014
    Southern California
    Barry
    I'd ask for a new one... If it was stored completely discharged or at high temps it'll have lower capacity.
    You could test it first though.

    Barry


    Sent from my iPad using Mu-43
     
  17. stargate

    stargate Mu-43 Regular

    131
    Aug 14, 2013
    Greece
    OK, I am an engineer but not the electronics engineer type. However I work at a major electronics company here in Greece and I consulted our power supplies design expert. The correct battery charging and discharging depends on the type of battery. Since we are talking about cameras, here is the correct way for lithium batteries.
    The lithium batteries have the property of drawing high charging current when they are near the 0-20% and strangely also when they are almost full 90-100%. High current means higher temperatures and high temperatures hurt the battery more. So his rule for charging a lithium battery is to charge it when about 30% and not charge it above 90%. This would be the optimum. Now charging it at about 30% is reasonable, but removing it from the charger at 90% would either require very sophisticated chargers or a lot of removing and testing. So on my question he said that it would not matter too much if it reached 100% but he was very firm on the 30% limit.
    Another thing is that slow charging (with low current available from the charger) should be prefered when one has time to spare. For overnight charging, a weak slow charger is better than a fast one.
    For storing, he said that lithium battery chemistry is such that for long term storage (more than a month) the battery should be between 40 and 60% full. He also said that that is why newly bought batteries are already half charged. Another thing he told me is that lithium batteries also deteriorate slightly with time even if never used, so he did not recommend stocking up on batteries for the future.
    So, this is lithium battery wisdom "right out of the horse's mouth" as the saying goes.
     
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